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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Wineman, Jean"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Jiang, Peng. Dense urbanism at the old edge: conflict and reconciliation of streets and buildings.

Degree: PhD, Architecture, 2009, Georgia Tech

In the last few decades, new centers have emerged at the edges of traditional cities and pre-World War II suburbs. As these evolve, do they converge towards the urban forms of traditional cities? This question is explored based on a study of urban areas in the Atlanta Metropolitan Region. Atlanta Downtown, Decatur and Marietta, are compared to the new centers in Buckhead, Cumberland and Perimeter. The evolution of the street network of Buckhead is examined in detail. The morphological history of a particular urban block in Buckheadâ "the Tower Place blockâ "is documented. Morphological analysis, focusing on street patterns, block shapes and sizes, property boundaries and building footprints, is complemented by Space Syntax, focusing on the structure of street networks and connectivity. It is shown that new urban centers tend to grow on very large blocks accessed through major transportation infrastructure, but situated in otherwise sparse and fragmentary street environments. As these centers grow and as the density of land use increases, a secondary private road system is created, to take advantage of development potential and provide access to major building investments. The effective fragmentation of the large blocks suggests a pattern of metric convergence towards an optimum block size. In traditional cities, however, the street network is stable over time and acts as the framework for changes in architecture and land use. In the new centers, the secondary road system serves to access particular private investments without regard to the creation of a public framework of connections. From a syntactic point of view, the new centers are spatially unintelligible, thus substantially diverging from traditional cities, even as they accommodate dense mixed use developments. The thesis points to the need of developing and using subdivision regulations and zoning classifications in order to better regulate the spatial structure of new urban centers in the future. Advisors/Committee Members: Peponis, John (Committee Chair), Allen, Douglas (Committee Member), Bafna, Sonit (Committee Member), Dobbins, Michael (Committee Member), Wineman, Jean (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Urban morphology; Space syntax; Edge City; Atlanta; Buckhead; Tower Place Block; Cities and towns; Morphogenesis; Cities and towns Growth; Urban cores

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APA (6th Edition):

Jiang, P. (2009). Dense urbanism at the old edge: conflict and reconciliation of streets and buildings. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/29699

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jiang, Peng. “Dense urbanism at the old edge: conflict and reconciliation of streets and buildings.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed August 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/29699.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jiang, Peng. “Dense urbanism at the old edge: conflict and reconciliation of streets and buildings.” 2009. Web. 18 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Jiang P. Dense urbanism at the old edge: conflict and reconciliation of streets and buildings. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. [cited 2019 Aug 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/29699.

Council of Science Editors:

Jiang P. Dense urbanism at the old edge: conflict and reconciliation of streets and buildings. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/29699


Georgia Tech

2. Dahabreh, Saleem Mokbel. The Formulation of Design: The Case of the Islip Courthouse by Richard Meier.

Degree: PhD, Architecture, 2006, Georgia Tech

The thesis asks whether the constrains imposed by complex functional programs and associated design guidance limit the ability to deploy design languages with entail their own precise compositional requirements. The Islip Federal Courthouse designed by Richard Meier under the General Services Administrations Design Excellence Program is chosen as a case study for two reasons: First, the functional constraints are explicitly documented, and their effects can be studied through a comparative analysis of recent Courthouses also built under the same GSA program; Second, Meiers language has received much scholarly attention, is well understood, and can be described with rigor. Both the functional requirements or constraints and the compositional principles associated with the design language are described as formal structures. The thesis shows that, in this instance, all functional constraints can be satisfied without compromising the elaboration of the language. Thus, the thesis contributes to our understanding of design logic and supports the idea that design intentions as well as design considerations can be reconstructed through a systematic study of the designed object Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Peponis, John (Committee Chair), Dr. Bafna, Sonit (Committee Member), Dr. Economou, Thanos (Committee Member), Dr. Wineman, Jean (Committee Member), Dr. Zimring, Craig (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Richard Meier design language; Design formulation; Design logic

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dahabreh, S. M. (2006). The Formulation of Design: The Case of the Islip Courthouse by Richard Meier. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10543

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dahabreh, Saleem Mokbel. “The Formulation of Design: The Case of the Islip Courthouse by Richard Meier.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed August 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10543.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dahabreh, Saleem Mokbel. “The Formulation of Design: The Case of the Islip Courthouse by Richard Meier.” 2006. Web. 18 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Dahabreh SM. The Formulation of Design: The Case of the Islip Courthouse by Richard Meier. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. [cited 2019 Aug 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10543.

Council of Science Editors:

Dahabreh SM. The Formulation of Design: The Case of the Islip Courthouse by Richard Meier. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10543

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