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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Wallace, Sally"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. King, Christian. Explaining the relationship between paternal incarceration and family well-being: a mediating model using food insecurity.

Degree: PhD, Public Policy, 2015, Georgia Tech

This dissertation explores whether families of incarcerated fathers are more likely to experience food insecurity as a result of the conviction of the father. More specifically, I test whether food insecurity explains some of the devastating consequences of paternal incarceration on mothers and children. Because children of incarcerated fathers are at higher risk of following their fathers’ footsteps, this cycle of incarceration can be self-perpetuating. I try to determine how policy can be used to break this cycle. This dissertation examines the role of food insecurity in explaining the negative impact of paternal incarceration on the well-being of mothers and children. The United States has experienced a huge prison boom over the last 40 years. A growing proportion of the incarcerated population are parents. Children growing up with one or both parents missing tend to have long-lasting disadvantages. Previous studies have attempted to suggest a few mechanisms through which paternal incarceration has negative consequences for families but has not considered the role of food insecurity. I propose a theoretical framework to show that paternal incarceration negatively affects mothers and children through food insecurity. Using a longitudinal study of fragile families, I find that food insecurity explains some of the negative consequences of paternal incarceration on maternal depression. On the other hand, food insecurity plays no role in the effect of paternal incarceration on child behavior problems. The findings also cast doubt on whether paternal incarceration affects child well-being. The implications for policy are two-fold. First, reducing food insecurity would mitigate the negative effects of paternal incarceration on maternal depression. More research is needed in order to understand whether the negative effects of paternal incarceration on maternal well-being can be further mitigated. Second, prison reform would do little to reduce the behavior problems experienced by children of incarcerated fathers. Rather than incarceration, other factors contributing to social disadvantages could explain why children of incarcerated fathers have more behavior problems than other children. Advisors/Committee Members: Lewis, Gregory B. (advisor), Drev, Matej (committee member), Pridemore, William Alex (committee member), Wallace, Sally (committee member), Minyard, Karen J. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Incarceration; Maternal well-being; Child well-being; Food insecurity; Hardship; Family well-being

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APA (6th Edition):

King, C. (2015). Explaining the relationship between paternal incarceration and family well-being: a mediating model using food insecurity. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53929

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

King, Christian. “Explaining the relationship between paternal incarceration and family well-being: a mediating model using food insecurity.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed February 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53929.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

King, Christian. “Explaining the relationship between paternal incarceration and family well-being: a mediating model using food insecurity.” 2015. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

King C. Explaining the relationship between paternal incarceration and family well-being: a mediating model using food insecurity. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2015. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53929.

Council of Science Editors:

King C. Explaining the relationship between paternal incarceration and family well-being: a mediating model using food insecurity. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53929


Georgia Tech

2. Khieu, Samphors. Essays on the impact of aid and institutions on income inequality and human welfare.

Degree: PhD, Public Policy, 2013, Georgia Tech

Billions of dollars in development aid are sent to developing countries every year. Weak institutions in recipient countries are the main impediments often discussed to prevent aid from reaching the intended targets. At the same time, they also hinder aid effectiveness in improving the lives of the people. This dissertation argues that the impact of aid on income distribution and human welfare in recipient countries differs by their institutional quality. Institutions encompass many different dimensions. This dissertation focuses on: corruption in government, quality of bureaucracy, and the rule of law. This study explores the impact in two essays. The first essay investigates the role of institutions in aid distribution. In particular, we examine the interplay between aid and institutions on income shares of different population groups (measured by income quintiles), and on the gap between the rich and the poor (measured by the Gini coefficient). The study uses Principal Component Analysis to construct an institutional index from the three components: corruption, bureaucratic quality, and the rule of law. Employing Two-Stage Least Squares (2SLS) methodology on a panel data of 85 countries from 1960 to 2004, this study finds that an increase in aid as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) decreases the income shares of the poor (quintile 1 and quintile 2), but increases that of the rich (quintile 5), thereby widening the gap between the rich and the poor (Gini coefficient). Contrary to our main hypothesis, though, recipient countries’ institutions do not play any role in aid distribution. Similarly, the second essay also focuses on the importance of recipient institutions, but it assesses aid effectiveness in improving human welfare. The study considers five human development indicators: the Human Development Index (HDI), the health index, the infant mortality rate, the education index, and the average years of schooling. The study empirically tests the hypothesis by utilizing the same methodology as in the first essay, but on a panel of 80 countries from 1980 to 2004. The findings suggest that human welfare in recipient countries improves as aid increases. The improvement appears to be driven more by the health than the education sector. Furthermore, aid is more effective in countries with poorer institutional quality, which is contrary to the hypothesis. However, the results are not consistent when taking into account government’s pro-poor public expenditure. Advisors/Committee Members: Rioja, Felix K. (advisor), Cozzens, Susan E. (committee member), Lewis, Gregory B. (committee member), Rider, Mark W. (committee member), Wallace, Sally (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Foreign aid; Institutions; Income inequality; Income distribution; Human welfare

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Khieu, S. (2013). Essays on the impact of aid and institutions on income inequality and human welfare. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53393

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Khieu, Samphors. “Essays on the impact of aid and institutions on income inequality and human welfare.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed February 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53393.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Khieu, Samphors. “Essays on the impact of aid and institutions on income inequality and human welfare.” 2013. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Khieu S. Essays on the impact of aid and institutions on income inequality and human welfare. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2013. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53393.

Council of Science Editors:

Khieu S. Essays on the impact of aid and institutions on income inequality and human welfare. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53393


Georgia Tech

3. Guo, Hai. Setting discretionary fiscal policy within the limits of budgetary institutions: evidence from American state governments.

Degree: PhD, Public Policy, 2008, Georgia Tech

Unanticipated economic fluctuations exert pressure on state governments to adjust their discretionary fiscal policies to accommodate the changing fiscal situation. Even though states adjust fiscal policy as the economy fluctuates, the typical cyclical economic factors are not the sole determinant of such adjustments. State governments budgeting systems in the United States operate under a variety of budgetary institutions. The most prominent state government budgetary institutions include balanced budget rules (BBRs), tax and expenditure limits (TELs), and supermajority voting requirements for tax increases. This dissertation examines how these budgetary institutions affect state government choices of fiscal policy under different economic conditions. To better understand the effect of state level TELs, a stringency index of state level TEL is constructed considering the major structural features. The fixed-effect panel regressions are used for the analysis of impact of TEL and BBR and tax changes and the fixed-effect Tobit is adopted to test the impact of TEL and BBR on spending cuts after the budget is adopted. The result suggests that TEL plays a more important role affecting states discretionary fiscal adjustment from the tax side, while BBR plays a more important role affecting states discretionary fiscal adjustment from the expenditure side. Results of this research show that TEL exerts pressure on states that hinder state ability to deal with volatile fiscal situations, especially in the case of periods of budget crises. Advisors/Committee Members: Willoughby, Katherine (Committee Chair), Eger, Robert (Committee Member), Kingsley, Gordon (Committee Member), Sjoquist, David (Committee Member), Wallace, Sally (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Discretionary fiscal policy; Budgetary institutions; TEL; BBR; Fiscal policy; Economic policy; Taxation; Budget United States States; Budget surpluses; Budget deficits; Budgeting; State governments; Federal government; Tobits; Budget process; Tax and expenditure limitations; Government spending policy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Guo, H. (2008). Setting discretionary fiscal policy within the limits of budgetary institutions: evidence from American state governments. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24738

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Guo, Hai. “Setting discretionary fiscal policy within the limits of budgetary institutions: evidence from American state governments.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed February 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24738.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Guo, Hai. “Setting discretionary fiscal policy within the limits of budgetary institutions: evidence from American state governments.” 2008. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Guo H. Setting discretionary fiscal policy within the limits of budgetary institutions: evidence from American state governments. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24738.

Council of Science Editors:

Guo H. Setting discretionary fiscal policy within the limits of budgetary institutions: evidence from American state governments. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24738

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