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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Steve Harvey"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. West, Ryan Matthew. Work function fluctuation analysis of polyaniline films.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2013, Georgia Tech

In this thesis, the development of a novel experimental technique for measuring the spontaneous, stochastic work function (WF) fluctuations of conducting polymer films, at equilibrium, is discussed. Polyaniline (PANI) is studied as a representative conducting polymer. This technique utilizes an insulated-gate field-effect transistor (IGFET) with PANI gate electrode (PANI-IGFET). The fluctuations of PANI WF are transduced into measurable drain current fluctuations of the device. By analyzing these fluctuations while systematically controlling the temperature, electric field and doping level, a model of WF fluctuations in PANI films is developed. These experiments suggest that the source of WF fluctuations is the hopping of charge carriers, or trapping/detrapping of charge carriers, around the Fermi level of the PANI film at the PANI-insulator interface. This process is thermally activated with a field and doping dependent activation energy in the range of 0.1 to 0.5 eV. Thus, this new technique provides detailed information about charge-carrier dynamics in the space-charge region of the PANI film, at equilibrium. These results have important implications for organic electronics and furthering fundamental understanding of the relationship between doping, disorder and work function in organic semiconductors. Advisors/Committee Members: Jiri Janata (Committee Chair), christine payne (Committee Member), Larry Bottomley (Committee Member), mira josowicz (Committee Member), steve harvey (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Noise; Field-effect transistor; Statistical mechanics; Polyaniline; Conducting polymer; Conducting polymers; Organic conductors; Electrons Emission

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APA (6th Edition):

West, R. M. (2013). Work function fluctuation analysis of polyaniline films. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47586

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

West, Ryan Matthew. “Work function fluctuation analysis of polyaniline films.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47586.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

West, Ryan Matthew. “Work function fluctuation analysis of polyaniline films.” 2013. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

West RM. Work function fluctuation analysis of polyaniline films. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47586.

Council of Science Editors:

West RM. Work function fluctuation analysis of polyaniline films. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47586


Georgia Tech

2. Korir, Cindy Chepngeno. Biochemical and molecular characterization of streptococcus pneumoniae strains resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics.

Degree: PhD, Biology, 2004, Georgia Tech

Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major pathogen that causes Otitis Media infections and bacterial meningitis in children as well as community acquired pneumonia in adults. Clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae exhibiting resistance to Beta-lactam antibiotics are being isolated with increased frequency in many countries. Streptococcus pneumoniae strains resistant to Beta-lactam drugs have modified forms of penicillin-binding proteins that exhibit reduced affinity for binding to chemotherapeutic Beta-lactams. Penicillin binding proteins are membrane-bound enzymes that catalyze the terminal step in cell wall synthesis, and are targets for Beta-lactam drugs. Seventeen clinical isolates and six vaccine strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae were characterized using conventional phenotypic methods, susceptibility to antimicrobial agents, capsular serotyping, and by different biochemical and genotyping methods. One strain, Sp D2, was resistant to penicillin and other Beta-lactams used in the study, to erythromycin, and to Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole. Sp D2 exhibited a unique protein profile in 1D SDS-PAGE gels of whole-cell proteins. Cells of Sp D2 were fractionated, and the cytoplasmic membrane fraction was obtained by ultracentrifugation and analyzed using a 1D SDS-PAGE gel. A protein band with a mass of ~50 kDa was excised and subjected to Trypsin In-Gel Digestion, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and database searching. The resulting MALDI-TOF-MS data (peptide mass fingerprints) did not produce any significant matches with proteins in any of the published S. pneumoniae genome databases. The 50 kDa protein was further subjected to N-terminal and internal sequence analysis and database searching, and the protein could not be identified by significant matches. Sp D2 did not react with any anti-pneumococcal polysaccharide capsular antibodies, and is designated as a non-typeable strain. Sp D2 exhibited a positive reaction in the Bile Solubility Test, the Optochin Test, and also positive reactions in PCR assays for the presence of the pneumococcal surface protein gene (PsaA), the autolysin gene (LytA), and the pneumolysin gene (Ply); which confirms that Sp D2 is a strain of S. pneumoniae. Advisors/Committee Members: Paul Edmonds (Committee Chair), Igor Zhulin (Committee Member), Mostafa El-Sayed (Committee Member), Steve Harvey (Committee Member), Yury Chernoff (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Beta-lactam; Antibiotic resistance; MALDI; Streptococcus pneumoniae

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Korir, C. C. (2004). Biochemical and molecular characterization of streptococcus pneumoniae strains resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5047

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Korir, Cindy Chepngeno. “Biochemical and molecular characterization of streptococcus pneumoniae strains resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5047.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Korir, Cindy Chepngeno. “Biochemical and molecular characterization of streptococcus pneumoniae strains resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics.” 2004. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Korir CC. Biochemical and molecular characterization of streptococcus pneumoniae strains resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5047.

Council of Science Editors:

Korir CC. Biochemical and molecular characterization of streptococcus pneumoniae strains resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5047


Georgia Tech

3. Horowitz, Eric D. Intercalator-mediated assembly of nucleic acids.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2009, Georgia Tech

The RNA World hypothesis suggests that RNA, or a proto-RNA, existed in an early form of life that had not yet developed the ability to synthesize protein enzymes. This hypothesis, by some interpretations, implies that nucleic acid polymers were the first polymers of life, and must have therefore spontaneously formed from simple molecular building blocks in the "prebiotic soup." Although prebiotic chemists have searched for decades for a process by which RNA can be made from plausible prebiotic reactions, numerous problems persist that stand in the way of a chemically-sound model for the spontaneous generation of an RNA World (e.g., strand-cyclization, heterogeneous backbones, non-selective ligation of activated nucleotides). The Molecular Midwife hypothesis, proposed by Hud and Anet in 2000, provides a possible solution to several problems associated with the assembly of the first nucleic acids. In this hypothesis, nucleic acid base pairs are assembled by small, planar molecules that resemble molecules which are known today to intercalate the base pairs of nucleic acid duplexes. Thus, the validity and merits of the Molecular Midwife hypothesis can be, to some extent, explored by studying the effects of intercalation on the non-covalent assembly of nucleic acids. In this thesis, I explore the role of the sugar-phosphate backbone in dictating the structure and thermodynamics of nucleic acid intercalation by using 2′,5′-linked RNA intercalation as a model system of non-natural nucleic acid intercalation. The solution structure of an intercalator-bound 2′,5′ RNA duplex reveals structural and thermodynamic aspects of intercalation that provide insight into the origin of the nearest-neighbor exclusion principle, a principle that is uniformly obeyed upon the intercalation of natural (i.e. 3′,5′-linked) RNA and DNA. I also demonstrate the ability of intercalator-mediated assembly to circumvent the strand-cyclization problem, a problem that otherwise greatly limits the polymerization of short oligonucleotides into long polymers. Together, the data presented in this thesis illustrate the important role that the nucleic acid backbone plays in governing the thermodynamics of intercalation, and provide support for the proposed role of intercalator-mediated assembly in the prebiotic formation of nucleic acids. Advisors/Committee Members: Nicholas V. Hud (Committee Chair), David Sherrill (Committee Member), Loren Williams (Committee Member), Roger Wartell (Committee Member), Steve Harvey (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: RNA; Intercalation; DNA; Nucleic acids; Origin of life; Template-directed synthesis; Life Origin; Oligonucleotides; Proteins Synthesis; Proteins

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Horowitz, E. D. (2009). Intercalator-mediated assembly of nucleic acids. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33937

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Horowitz, Eric D. “Intercalator-mediated assembly of nucleic acids.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33937.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Horowitz, Eric D. “Intercalator-mediated assembly of nucleic acids.” 2009. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Horowitz ED. Intercalator-mediated assembly of nucleic acids. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33937.

Council of Science Editors:

Horowitz ED. Intercalator-mediated assembly of nucleic acids. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33937

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