Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Snell, Terry"). Showing records 1 – 12 of 12 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Georgia Tech

1. Johnston, Rachel Kelsey. Moderately lower temperatures greatly extend the lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera): thermodynamics or gene regulation?.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2015, Georgia Tech

 Environmental temperature greatly affects lifespan in a wide variety of animals, but the exact mechanisms underlying this effect are still largely unknown. A moderate temperature… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Rotifera; Lifespan; Aging; Temperature; TRP; RNAi

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Johnston, R. K. (2015). Moderately lower temperatures greatly extend the lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera): thermodynamics or gene regulation?. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/56215

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnston, Rachel Kelsey. “Moderately lower temperatures greatly extend the lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera): thermodynamics or gene regulation?.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/56215.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnston, Rachel Kelsey. “Moderately lower temperatures greatly extend the lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera): thermodynamics or gene regulation?.” 2015. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Johnston RK. Moderately lower temperatures greatly extend the lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera): thermodynamics or gene regulation?. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/56215.

Council of Science Editors:

Johnston RK. Moderately lower temperatures greatly extend the lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera): thermodynamics or gene regulation?. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/56215


Georgia Tech

2. Walker, Christopher L. Green fluorescent protein inspired chromophore as estrogen receptor agonist-synthesis, biological evaluations and cellular application.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2019, Georgia Tech

 Nuclear receptors are ligand activated transcription factors that are widely distributed throughout the mammalians. There are 48 known human nuclear receptors within the body located… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Estrogen receptor

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Walker, C. L. (2019). Green fluorescent protein inspired chromophore as estrogen receptor agonist-synthesis, biological evaluations and cellular application. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/61211

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Walker, Christopher L. “Green fluorescent protein inspired chromophore as estrogen receptor agonist-synthesis, biological evaluations and cellular application.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/61211.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Walker, Christopher L. “Green fluorescent protein inspired chromophore as estrogen receptor agonist-synthesis, biological evaluations and cellular application.” 2019. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Walker CL. Green fluorescent protein inspired chromophore as estrogen receptor agonist-synthesis, biological evaluations and cellular application. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2019. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/61211.

Council of Science Editors:

Walker CL. Green fluorescent protein inspired chromophore as estrogen receptor agonist-synthesis, biological evaluations and cellular application. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/61211

3. Stout, Elizabeth Paige. Discovery and synthesis of bioactive natural product probes from marine systems.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2010, Georgia Tech

 Flora and fauna from terrestrial and marine environments provide libraries of natural compounds for drug discovery. The last four decades have seen major advances in… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Confocal microscopy; Fluorescent probes; Antibacterial; Antimalarial; Macroalgae; Natural products; Molecular probes; Marine natural products

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stout, E. P. (2010). Discovery and synthesis of bioactive natural product probes from marine systems. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/37301

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stout, Elizabeth Paige. “Discovery and synthesis of bioactive natural product probes from marine systems.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/37301.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stout, Elizabeth Paige. “Discovery and synthesis of bioactive natural product probes from marine systems.” 2010. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Stout EP. Discovery and synthesis of bioactive natural product probes from marine systems. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2010. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/37301.

Council of Science Editors:

Stout EP. Discovery and synthesis of bioactive natural product probes from marine systems. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/37301

4. Stern, Joshua Gallant. STORI: selectable taxon ortholog retrieval iteratively.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2013, Georgia Tech

 Speciation and gene duplication are fundamental evolutionary processes that enable biological innovation. For over a decade, biologists have endeavored to distinguish orthology (homology caused by… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Ortholog prediction; Protein sequence retrieval; Modeling bacterial evolution; Fusobacteria; Molecular sequence data management; Bayesian inference phylogenomics

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stern, J. G. (2013). STORI: selectable taxon ortholog retrieval iteratively. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53377

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stern, Joshua Gallant. “STORI: selectable taxon ortholog retrieval iteratively.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53377.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stern, Joshua Gallant. “STORI: selectable taxon ortholog retrieval iteratively.” 2013. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Stern JG. STORI: selectable taxon ortholog retrieval iteratively. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53377.

Council of Science Editors:

Stern JG. STORI: selectable taxon ortholog retrieval iteratively. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53377

5. Penczykowski, Rachel M. Interactions between ecosystems and disease in the plankton of freshwater lakes.

Degree: PhD, Biology, 2013, Georgia Tech

 I investigated effects of environmental change on disease, and effects of disease on ecosystems, using a freshwater zooplankton host and its fungal parasite. This research… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Daphnia; Epidemiology; Eutrophication; Foraging behavior; Fungal pathogen; Habitat structure; Host-parasite; Nutrient enrichment; Zooplankton; Epidemiology Research; Marine ecosystem health; Marine ecology; Plankton; Freshwater plankton

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Penczykowski, R. M. (2013). Interactions between ecosystems and disease in the plankton of freshwater lakes. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/50368

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Penczykowski, Rachel M. “Interactions between ecosystems and disease in the plankton of freshwater lakes.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/50368.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Penczykowski, Rachel M. “Interactions between ecosystems and disease in the plankton of freshwater lakes.” 2013. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Penczykowski RM. Interactions between ecosystems and disease in the plankton of freshwater lakes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/50368.

Council of Science Editors:

Penczykowski RM. Interactions between ecosystems and disease in the plankton of freshwater lakes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/50368

6. Smith, Hilary April. Evolution of Reproduction and Stress Tolerance in Brachionid Rotifers.

Degree: PhD, Biology, 2012, Georgia Tech

 Stress can be a driving force for new evolutionary changes leading to local adaptation, or may be responded to with pre-existing, ancestral tolerance mechanisms. Using… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cyclical parthenogenesis; Ephemeral; Diapause; Senescence; Cost of sex; Sex frequency; Heat shock proteins (HSP)

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Smith, H. A. (2012). Evolution of Reproduction and Stress Tolerance in Brachionid Rotifers. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/52145

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smith, Hilary April. “Evolution of Reproduction and Stress Tolerance in Brachionid Rotifers.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/52145.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smith, Hilary April. “Evolution of Reproduction and Stress Tolerance in Brachionid Rotifers.” 2012. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Smith HA. Evolution of Reproduction and Stress Tolerance in Brachionid Rotifers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2012. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/52145.

Council of Science Editors:

Smith HA. Evolution of Reproduction and Stress Tolerance in Brachionid Rotifers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/52145


Georgia Tech

7. Drexel, Jan Peter. Contribution of Nitrogen Fixation to Planktonic Food Webs North of Australia.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2007, Georgia Tech

 Nitrogen fixation is no longer considered to be a minor factor of the nitrogen cycle in oceanic ecosystems. Recent geochemical and biological efforts have led… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Nitrogen fixation; Diazotrophy; Trichodesmium; New nitrogen; Food web; D15N; D13C; Nitrogen – Fixation; Ecosystem management; Australia

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Drexel, J. P. (2007). Contribution of Nitrogen Fixation to Planktonic Food Webs North of Australia. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19733

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Drexel, Jan Peter. “Contribution of Nitrogen Fixation to Planktonic Food Webs North of Australia.” 2007. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19733.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Drexel, Jan Peter. “Contribution of Nitrogen Fixation to Planktonic Food Webs North of Australia.” 2007. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Drexel JP. Contribution of Nitrogen Fixation to Planktonic Food Webs North of Australia. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2007. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19733.

Council of Science Editors:

Drexel JP. Contribution of Nitrogen Fixation to Planktonic Food Webs North of Australia. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19733


Georgia Tech

8. Prince, Emily Katherine. Chemically-mediated interactions in the plankton: defenses against grazing and competitors by a red tide dinoflagellate.

Degree: PhD, Biology, 2008, Georgia Tech

 The species composition of planktonic communities is determined not only by abiotic factors, such as nutrient availability, temperature, and water column stratification but also by… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Brevetoxin; Competition; Predation; Chemical ecology; Harmful algal bloom; Karenia brevis; Dinoflagellate blooms; Competition (Biology); Red tide; Polyketides; Allelopathy

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Prince, E. K. (2008). Chemically-mediated interactions in the plankton: defenses against grazing and competitors by a red tide dinoflagellate. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/22701

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Prince, Emily Katherine. “Chemically-mediated interactions in the plankton: defenses against grazing and competitors by a red tide dinoflagellate.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/22701.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Prince, Emily Katherine. “Chemically-mediated interactions in the plankton: defenses against grazing and competitors by a red tide dinoflagellate.” 2008. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Prince EK. Chemically-mediated interactions in the plankton: defenses against grazing and competitors by a red tide dinoflagellate. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/22701.

Council of Science Editors:

Prince EK. Chemically-mediated interactions in the plankton: defenses against grazing and competitors by a red tide dinoflagellate. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/22701


Georgia Tech

9. Kovacs, Jennifer L. Queen-specific selective pressures and caste dimorphism in the social wasp Vespula maculifrons.

Degree: PhD, Biology, 2009, Georgia Tech

 Within social insect colonies, sterile workers are responsible for brood care, while queens are the primary egg-layers. These reproductive caste differences are often accompanied by… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Overwintering; Mating success; Hymenoptera; Morphology; Allometry; Social insects; Caste dimorphism; Quantitative genetics; Insects; Wasps; Altruistic behavior in animals; Altruism

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kovacs, J. L. (2009). Queen-specific selective pressures and caste dimorphism in the social wasp Vespula maculifrons. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/37100

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kovacs, Jennifer L. “Queen-specific selective pressures and caste dimorphism in the social wasp Vespula maculifrons.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/37100.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kovacs, Jennifer L. “Queen-specific selective pressures and caste dimorphism in the social wasp Vespula maculifrons.” 2009. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Kovacs JL. Queen-specific selective pressures and caste dimorphism in the social wasp Vespula maculifrons. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/37100.

Council of Science Editors:

Kovacs JL. Queen-specific selective pressures and caste dimorphism in the social wasp Vespula maculifrons. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/37100


Georgia Tech

10. Edge, Sara Elizabeth. Using Microarrays to Quantify Stress Responses in Natural Populations of Coral.

Degree: PhD, Biology, 2007, Georgia Tech

 Coral reefs are one of the world s most valuable ecosystems but are declining at an accelerating rate. Common stressors impacting coral health include elevated… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Coral; Gene expression; Microarray; Stress

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Edge, S. E. (2007). Using Microarrays to Quantify Stress Responses in Natural Populations of Coral. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16165

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Edge, Sara Elizabeth. “Using Microarrays to Quantify Stress Responses in Natural Populations of Coral.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16165.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Edge, Sara Elizabeth. “Using Microarrays to Quantify Stress Responses in Natural Populations of Coral.” 2007. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Edge SE. Using Microarrays to Quantify Stress Responses in Natural Populations of Coral. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16165.

Council of Science Editors:

Edge SE. Using Microarrays to Quantify Stress Responses in Natural Populations of Coral. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16165


Georgia Tech

11. Wilson, Alan Elliott. Cyanobacteria-Grazer Interactions: Consequences of toxicity, morphology, and genetic diversity.

Degree: PhD, Biology, 2006, Georgia Tech

 Interactions between cyanobacteria and herbivorous grazers play an important role in mediating the responses of freshwater phytoplankton assemblages to nutrient enrichment and top-down manipulation. Negative… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Meta-analysis; Fitness; Review; Population growth; Morphology; Rotifer; Meta-analysis; Nutrient pollution of water; Cyanobacteria; Herbivores

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wilson, A. E. (2006). Cyanobacteria-Grazer Interactions: Consequences of toxicity, morphology, and genetic diversity. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10542

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wilson, Alan Elliott. “Cyanobacteria-Grazer Interactions: Consequences of toxicity, morphology, and genetic diversity.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10542.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wilson, Alan Elliott. “Cyanobacteria-Grazer Interactions: Consequences of toxicity, morphology, and genetic diversity.” 2006. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Wilson AE. Cyanobacteria-Grazer Interactions: Consequences of toxicity, morphology, and genetic diversity. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10542.

Council of Science Editors:

Wilson AE. Cyanobacteria-Grazer Interactions: Consequences of toxicity, morphology, and genetic diversity. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10542


Georgia Tech

12. Hollebone, Amanda L. An Invasive Crab in the South Atlantic Bight: Friend or Foe?.

Degree: PhD, Biology, 2006, Georgia Tech

 The green porcelain crab, Petrolisthes armatus, has recently invaded oyster reefs of the South Atlantic Bight at mean densities of up to several thousand individuals… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biotic resistance; South Atlantic Bight; Oyster reefs

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hollebone, A. L. (2006). An Invasive Crab in the South Atlantic Bight: Friend or Foe?. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10537

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hollebone, Amanda L. “An Invasive Crab in the South Atlantic Bight: Friend or Foe?.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10537.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hollebone, Amanda L. “An Invasive Crab in the South Atlantic Bight: Friend or Foe?.” 2006. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Hollebone AL. An Invasive Crab in the South Atlantic Bight: Friend or Foe?. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10537.

Council of Science Editors:

Hollebone AL. An Invasive Crab in the South Atlantic Bight: Friend or Foe?. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10537

.