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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Robert J. Eger, III"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Brien, Spencer T. Three essays on the formation and finance of local governments.

Degree: PhD, Public Policy, 2011, Georgia Tech

This dissertation follows a three-essay format. Each essay evaluates a different fiscal institution from a public administration perspective. In the first essay I examine whether state-funded property tax exemptions are effective in reducing the property taxes. This class of exemption is characterized by a grant from state to local governments that is intended to replace property tax revenue and lower property tax payments. Two separate theories of local fiscal behavior predict that that price effects and fiscal illusion will reduce the effectiveness of this type of tax relief. I test these predictions using panel regression analysis on county-level data from Georgia. I find that only two thirds of the revenue allocated to this program is actually used for tax relief. In the second essay I test a model of the property tax in which the levy is set to balance the difference between budgeted expenditures and expected receipts from all other revenue sources. This model demonstrates how the property tax can be used to offset unexpected changes to other revenues given a change in personal income. This model is contrasted with an alternative model in which expenditures are budgeted after expected total revenues have been determined. I will estimate both models for local governments in Georgia and test which more accurately describes local fiscal performance. I will also use both to predict changes to the property tax over a period of time and measure which model generated the more accurate forecast. Unlike the first two papers, which are quantitative analyses of fiscal data, this chapter is a case study of the contract city model of governance as implemented in the newly incorporated city of Sandy Springs, Georgia. I investigate whether the scope of outsourcing in contract cities creates additional challenges for city officials that manage contractor performance. I evaluate the incentive structures in the contract agreements that influence the principal-agent relationship using a textual analysis research method. I find that certain combinations of municipal functions in a single public-private partnership creates the potential for negative synergies to arise which would increase the difficulty of monitoring and managing the private partner. Advisors/Committee Members: David Sjoquist (Committee Member), Douglas Noonan (Committee Member), Greg Lewis (Committee Member), Jon Rork (Committee Member), Robert J. Eger III (Committee Member), W. Bartley Hildreth (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Property tax; Contract cities; Local government; Property tax; Tax relief; Government outsourcing; Local government; Local finance Accounting; Tax exemption; Property tax; Municipal services Contracting out

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APA (6th Edition):

Brien, S. T. (2011). Three essays on the formation and finance of local governments. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42890

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brien, Spencer T. “Three essays on the formation and finance of local governments.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42890.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brien, Spencer T. “Three essays on the formation and finance of local governments.” 2011. Web. 27 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Brien ST. Three essays on the formation and finance of local governments. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. [cited 2020 Jan 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42890.

Council of Science Editors:

Brien ST. Three essays on the formation and finance of local governments. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42890


Georgia Tech

2. Kim, Jungbu. Do Different Expenditure Mechanisms Invite Different Influences? Evidence from Research Expenditures of the National Institutes of Health.

Degree: PhD, Public Policy, 2007, Georgia Tech

This study examines 1) whether the different expenditure mechanisms used by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) invite different sources of influences on the budget process and thus on the expenditure outcomes and 2) whether the frequent use of omnibus appropriations bills since 1996 has changed budget levels of the institutes under the NIH. The NIH uses two major expenditure mechanisms with very different beneficiary groups: the principal investigator-initiated Research Project Grants and Intramural Research. Drawing on theories of motivations of public officials and of political clout of agency heads and considering empirical studies of the effect of omnibus legislation, this study reveals the following: 1) directors with more public service experience are more successful in securing a higher budget for their institutes; 2) while the directors are found to be driven by public service motivation, when it comes to expenditure allocation between two different mechanisms, they behave in a self-interested manner, representing the interests of the institutional sectors where they have developed close relationships; 3) with ever-increasing budgets between 1983 and 2005, the institute directors have chosen to seek higher budgets rather than merely avoid the risk of budget cuts; 4) although the advisory boards are purportedly used to seek private input for the priority setting, they tend to increase intramural more than external research project grant expenditures; 5) the practice of omnibus appropriations bills significantly benefits the institutes under the NIH such that with omnibus legislation the institutes¡¯ total expenditures have more than doubled controlling the other factors; and 6) there are significant differences in the effects of the director¡¯s public experience and the number of advisory boards and their membership both (i) between disease-focused institutes and nondisease institutes and (ii) with and without omnibus legislation. The effects of the director¡¯s public service experience and the advisory boards have more budgetary impact in the general science-focused institutes than in their disease-focused counterparts. The influence of the advisory board and of the institute director¡¯s public service experience on the individual institute¡¯s expenditure level is significantly diminished by the frequent use of omnibus appropriations bills. Advisors/Committee Members: Robert J. Eger, III (Committee Chair), Gregory B. Lewis (Committee Member), John Clayton Thomas (Committee Member), Juan Rogers (Committee Member), Katherine Willoughby (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Omnibus legislation; Public service motivation; National Institutes of Health; Bureaucratic maximization; R&D; Expenditure mechanisms

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kim, J. (2007). Do Different Expenditure Mechanisms Invite Different Influences? Evidence from Research Expenditures of the National Institutes of Health. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16235

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kim, Jungbu. “Do Different Expenditure Mechanisms Invite Different Influences? Evidence from Research Expenditures of the National Institutes of Health.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16235.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kim, Jungbu. “Do Different Expenditure Mechanisms Invite Different Influences? Evidence from Research Expenditures of the National Institutes of Health.” 2007. Web. 27 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Kim J. Do Different Expenditure Mechanisms Invite Different Influences? Evidence from Research Expenditures of the National Institutes of Health. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. [cited 2020 Jan 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16235.

Council of Science Editors:

Kim J. Do Different Expenditure Mechanisms Invite Different Influences? Evidence from Research Expenditures of the National Institutes of Health. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16235


Georgia Tech

3. Slade, Catherine Putnam. Does Patient-Centered Care Affect Racial Disparities in Health?.

Degree: PhD, Public Policy, 2008, Georgia Tech

This thesis presents a challenge to policy initiatives that presume that patient-centered care will reduce racial disparities in health. Data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey were used to test patient assessment of provider behavior defined as patient-centered care according to the National Health Disparities Report of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality of the Department of Health and Human Services. Results indicated patient-centered care improves self-rated health status, but blacks still report worse health status than whites experiencing comparable patient-centered care. Further, black-white differences in patient-centered care had no affect on health status. Rival theories of black-white differences in health, including social class and health literacy, provided better explanations of disparities than assessment of provider behaviors. These findings suggest that policies designed to financially incentivize patient-centered care practices by providers should be considered with caution. While patient-centered care is better quality care, financial incentives could have a negative effect on minority health if providers are deterred from practices that serve disproportionate numbers of poor and less literate patients and their families. Measurement of the concept of patient-centered care in future health disparities research was also discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Robert J. Eger III, Ph.D. (Committee Chair), Christopher M. Weible, Ph.D. (Committee Member), Gregory B. Lewis, Ph.D. (Committee Member), Monica M. Gaughan, Ph.D. (Committee Member), Valerie A. Hepburn, Ph.D. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Health care delivery; Race interaction terms; Pay-for-performance; Health policy; Discrimination in medical care; Allied health personnel and patient

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Slade, C. P. (2008). Does Patient-Centered Care Affect Racial Disparities in Health?. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/22569

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Slade, Catherine Putnam. “Does Patient-Centered Care Affect Racial Disparities in Health?.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/22569.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Slade, Catherine Putnam. “Does Patient-Centered Care Affect Racial Disparities in Health?.” 2008. Web. 27 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Slade CP. Does Patient-Centered Care Affect Racial Disparities in Health?. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. [cited 2020 Jan 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/22569.

Council of Science Editors:

Slade CP. Does Patient-Centered Care Affect Racial Disparities in Health?. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/22569

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