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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Robert C Long, Jr"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Stabler, Cheryl Lynn. Development of Noninvasive Methods for Monitoring Tissue Engineered Constructs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2004, Georgia Tech

Implanted tissue engineered substitutes constitute dynamic systems, with remodeling mediated by both the implanted cells and the host. Thus, there exists a significant need for methods to monitor the function and morphology of tissue engineered constructs. Noninvasive monitoring using 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging can prove to be the solution to this problem. Spectroscopy allows for assessment of cellular function through the monitoring of inherent metabolic markers, such as total-choline, while high resolution imaging enables the evaluation of construct morphology and interfacial remodeling. We applied these 1H NMR methods to monitor betaTC3 mouse insulinoma cells within hydrogel-based materials as a model pancreatic tissue substitute. In vitro research established a strong correlation between total-choline, measured by 1H NMR spectroscopy, and viable betaTC3 cell number, measured by MTT. Extending these methods to in vivo monitoring, however, was met with additional challenges. First, the implanted cells needed to be contained within a planar construct above a threshold density to allow for adequate quantification of the total-choline peak. Secondly, cell-free buffer zones between the implanted cells and the host tissue needed to be incorporated to prevent host tissue signal contamination. Finally, quantitative techniques needed to be developed to accurately account for contaminating signal from diffusing molecules. To overcome these challenges, a disk-shaped agarose construct, initially containing a minimum of 4 million betaTC3 cells and coated with an outer layer of pure agarose, was fabricated. Mathematical simulations aided the implant design by characterizing diffusive transport of nutrients and metabolites into and out of the construct. In vivo 1H NMR studies of these constructs implanted in mice established a strong correlation between total-choline, measured noninvasively using 1H NMR spectroscopy, and viable cell number, measured invasively using MTT. This study establishes total-choline as a reliable marker for noninvasively quantifying dynamic changes in viable betaTC3 cell number in vivo. 1H NMR imaging was used to monitor the implants structural integrity over time, while also assessing the hosts fibrotic response. We expect these studies to establish quantitative criteria for the capabilities and limitations of NMR methodologies for monitoring encapsulated insulinomas, as well as other tissue implants. Advisors/Committee Members: Athanassios Sambanis (Committee Chair), Elliot Chaikof (Committee Member), Ioannis Constantinidis (Committee Member), Robert C Long, Jr (Committee Member), Stephen Hanson (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Agarose; NMR; Bioartificial pancreas; Alginate; Spectrum analysis; Pancreas Imaging; Nuclear magnetic resonance; Magnetic resonance imaging; Diagnostic imaging; Alginates

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APA (6th Edition):

Stabler, C. L. (2004). Development of Noninvasive Methods for Monitoring Tissue Engineered Constructs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5239

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stabler, Cheryl Lynn. “Development of Noninvasive Methods for Monitoring Tissue Engineered Constructs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5239.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stabler, Cheryl Lynn. “Development of Noninvasive Methods for Monitoring Tissue Engineered Constructs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.” 2004. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Stabler CL. Development of Noninvasive Methods for Monitoring Tissue Engineered Constructs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5239.

Council of Science Editors:

Stabler CL. Development of Noninvasive Methods for Monitoring Tissue Engineered Constructs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5239


Georgia Tech

2. Sun, Binjian. Multicontrast MRI of Atherosclerotic Plaques: Acquisition, Characterization and Reconstruction.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2007, Georgia Tech

Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) continues to be the leading cause of death in western countries according to the statistics update by the American Heart Association. Atherosclerosis is estimated to be responsible for a large portion of CVD and affects 60 million people in the United States. Accurate diagnosis is crucial for proper treatment planning. Currently, the clinical standard screening technique for diagnosing atherosclerosis is x-ray angiography, which reveals the residual lumen size. X-ray angiographic images possess good resolution and contrast, however, lumen size is not always a proper criterion given the positive remodeling nature of atherosclerotic plaques. In the past decade, it has been shown that most plaques responsible for a fatal or nonfatal myocardial infarction are less than 70% stenosed. Clinical data support the idea that plaques producing non-flow-limiting stenoses account for more cases of plaque rupture and thrombosis than plaques producing a more severe stenosis. Due to this fact, plaque itself must be imaged in order to assess its vulnerability. A wealth of literature suggests that multicontrast MRI has the potential of characterizing plaque constituents, and thus is a promising technique for plaque imaging. Because of the technical difficulties associated with in-vivo plaque imaging and the fact that our research was aimed at developing new methodologies, our approaches was to image excised coronary arteries under simulated in-vivo conditions in a tissue culture chamber. It is shown by this research that automatic plaque characterization techniques developed under ex-vivo conditions still apply for in-vivo studies. Based on this finding, an automatic plaque characterization technique using multicontrast MRI was developed. Furthermore, "shared k-space" reconstruction techniques were interrogated to assess their feasibility in accelerating multicontrast MRI acquisition. Results show that these techniques are promising in accelerating multicontrast MRI acquisitions. Advisors/Committee Members: Don P. Giddens (Committee Chair), John N. Oshinski (Committee Co-Chair), Raymond P. Vito (Committee Member), Robert C. Long, Jr. (Committee Member), W. Robert Taylor (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Atherosclerosis; MRI; Plaque characterization; Atherosclerotic plaque Magnetic resonance imaging

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sun, B. (2007). Multicontrast MRI of Atherosclerotic Plaques: Acquisition, Characterization and Reconstruction. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16291

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sun, Binjian. “Multicontrast MRI of Atherosclerotic Plaques: Acquisition, Characterization and Reconstruction.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16291.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sun, Binjian. “Multicontrast MRI of Atherosclerotic Plaques: Acquisition, Characterization and Reconstruction.” 2007. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Sun B. Multicontrast MRI of Atherosclerotic Plaques: Acquisition, Characterization and Reconstruction. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16291.

Council of Science Editors:

Sun B. Multicontrast MRI of Atherosclerotic Plaques: Acquisition, Characterization and Reconstruction. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16291

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