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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Nael A. McCarty"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Munir, Farasat. A fast, scalable acoustic resonator-based biosensor array system for simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers.

Degree: PhD, Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2012, Georgia Tech

This thesis is about the design of a biosensor system for detection of multiple cancer biomarkers. Accurate diagnosis and prognosis of cancer requires early detection. Equally important, though, is the measurement of biomarker-velocity and detection of multiple biomarkers. Early detection requires highly sensitive biosensors capable of detection at very low concentrations of target molecules. Biomarker-velocity can be measured by monitoring concentration of target molecule over a period of time. This requires a system which is very easy to use, fast, flexible, inexpensive and portable, thus enabling its ubiquitous presence at the point of care. For detection of multiplexed biomarkers, biosensors which easily lend to array configuration are required. Conventional techniques do not fulfill either all or some aspects of the requirements listed above. In this work, we present the design of a biosensor system, keeping in view the desired features described above, to achieve the ultimate goal of enabling ubiquitous presence of biosensor at the point of care. We focus on acoustic transducer based biosensors. The two fundamental components of design in an acoustic biosensor are the design of an acoustic transducer and the design of a novel electrical interface for the transducer. For transducer design, we introduce and present the design of a single structure, GHz range, multi-mode acoustic resonator. We present this as a suitable transducer for liquid phase biosensors, which is the preferred medium for sensing of cancer biomarkers. We explore the underlying physics and do experimental and theoretical characterization of this device. The transducer needs to be functionalized with a chemically sensitive layer which performs the molecular recognition of cancer biomarkers. We present the experimental exploration of a reversible and oriented immobilization based Histidine-Ni(2+) interaction which used NTA as the chelator for anchoring onto the device. Then we discuss the microfluidic design to enable liquid phase operation. We used SU-8 polymer barriers for liquid containment and addressed the challenges of making it compatible with ZnO based devices. An electrical interface is needed to excite and extract the sensor response. We have presented here a novel method to measure and track a resonator's response and extract its characteristic parameters. This method measures the wideband frequency response of the resonator with a much simpler setup as compared to conventional methods. We have proposed and demonstrated the use of a white noise signal as a viable signal for broadband excitation of resonator-based sensing platforms. We have also established, shown through simulation and prototype measurements, the feasibility of the proposed method. The accuracy and speed of the system can be further greatly improved by FFT-based digital implementation of the spectral analysis system. We have presented an example hardware implementation of FFT-based signal analyzer, and have discussed the hardware resources required for actual… Advisors/Committee Members: William D. Hunt (Committee Chair), Bruno Frazier (Committee Member), James Stevenson Kenney (Committee Member), Mary Ann Ingram (Committee Member), Nael A McCarty (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Solidly mounted resonator; Hybrid-mode; Su-8; Noise excitation; Resonator interface; Mulit-mode; Biosensors; Acoustic resonator; BAW; Biosensors; Biochemical markers; Tumor markers

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APA (6th Edition):

Munir, F. (2012). A fast, scalable acoustic resonator-based biosensor array system for simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47712

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Munir, Farasat. “A fast, scalable acoustic resonator-based biosensor array system for simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47712.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Munir, Farasat. “A fast, scalable acoustic resonator-based biosensor array system for simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers.” 2012. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Munir F. A fast, scalable acoustic resonator-based biosensor array system for simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2012. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47712.

Council of Science Editors:

Munir F. A fast, scalable acoustic resonator-based biosensor array system for simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47712


Georgia Tech

2. McRae, Reagan. Investigating metal homeostasis in mammalian cells using high resolution imaging techniques.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2010, Georgia Tech

The primary aim of the work presented in this thesis is to elucidate novel information regarding the uptake, storage, distributions, and functions of both copper and zinc in mammalian cells by predominantly using a combination of the high resolution imaging modalities, synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence microscopy (SXRF) and standard fluorescence imaging. Results from studies using cell permeable, metal ion selective fluorescent probes suggested the presence of labile pools of copper and zinc localized within the mitochondria and Golgi apparatus. Furthermore, SXRF imaging of a cell line defective in the copper transporter, Atox1, revealed intriguing differences in the Cu distribution of Atox1-/- cells compared to the corresponding wild-type cells. Finally, spatially well-resolved SXRF elemental maps of single, adherent mouse cells revealed remarkable changes in the distributions of both zinc and copper as the cells progressed through the cell cycle. Taken together, findings suggested major roles for copper and zinc within a native biological setting. Advisors/Committee Members: Christoph J. Fahrni (Committee Chair), Donald Doyle (Committee Member), Jake Soper (Committee Member), Nael A. McCarty (Committee Member), Uwe Bunz (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Microscopy; Imaging; Synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence; Copper; Zinc; Synchrotron radiation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McRae, R. (2010). Investigating metal homeostasis in mammalian cells using high resolution imaging techniques. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/41197

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McRae, Reagan. “Investigating metal homeostasis in mammalian cells using high resolution imaging techniques.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/41197.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McRae, Reagan. “Investigating metal homeostasis in mammalian cells using high resolution imaging techniques.” 2010. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

McRae R. Investigating metal homeostasis in mammalian cells using high resolution imaging techniques. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2010. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/41197.

Council of Science Editors:

McRae R. Investigating metal homeostasis in mammalian cells using high resolution imaging techniques. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/41197


Georgia Tech

3. Jones, Kymry Thereasa. The role of beta-arrestin in regulating the muscarinic acetylcholine type II receptor.

Degree: PhD, Biology, 2007, Georgia Tech

The muscarinic acetylcholine type 2 receptor (M2 mAChR), a member of the GPCR superfamily, is found throughout the parasympathetic nervous system where it controls pulmonary, urinary, and cardiac function, and neurotransmission. The molecular mechanisms that regulate M2 mAChR availability at the cell surface are an important component in controlling these physiological events. Since beta-arrestin proteins are known to regulate the activity of other GPCRs, we sought to identify their role in regulating M2 mAChR activity, a topic that remains contentious in the field. To achieve this goal we utilized mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from beta-arrestin knockout mice lacking one or both isoforms (MEF KO1, KO2, or KO1/2 cells) in addition to exogenous expression of beta-arrestin mutants. This study demonstrates that agonist-induced internalization of M2 mAChR is beta-arrestin- and clathrin-dependent, and that the receptor stably co-localizes with beta-arrestin in early endosomal vesicles suggesting it behaves as a class B receptor. Next, we sought to identify beta-arrestin s function in regulating the post-endocytic trafficking (down-regulation) of the M2 mAChR. MEF KO1/2 cells were unable to down-regulate M2 mAChRs whereas MEF KO1 or KO2 cells retained the ability to do so. In MEFwt cells, both M2 mAChR and beta-arrestin exhibited basal ubiquitination that increased following agonist stimulation. Receptor degradation appeared to be regulated by the ubiquitination status of beta-arrestin 2, since expression of a chimeric รข-arrestin 2 form fused to ubiquitin increased both constitutive and agonist-promoted down-regulation, whereas expression of a beta-arrestin 2 mutant lacking putative ubiquitination sites, beta-arrestin 2K18R, K107R, K108R, K207R, K296R, significantly blocked degradation while internalization and stable association remained intact. Upon further analysis, the beta-arrestin 2K18R, K107R, K108R, K207R, K296R mutant blocked delivery of M2 mAChR to the late endosome/lysosome, presumably where degradation occurs. Inhibition of proteasome-dependent recycling of ubiquitin blocked receptor down-regulation without affecting internalization or the ubiquitination state of the M2 mAChR while ubiquitination of beta-arrestin 2 diminished significantly. These results support a role for ubiquitinated beta-arrestin in mediating M2 mAChR sorting and degradation in the lysosome. Collectively, these studies give us new insight on the function of beta-arrestin in regulating the activity of the M2 mAChR. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Nael A. McCarty (Committee Chair), Dr. Darrell Jackson (Committee Co-Chair), Dr. Alfred H. Merrill (Committee Member), Dr. Barbara D. Boyan (Committee Member), Dr. Harish Radhakrishna (Committee Member), Dr. Marion B. Sewer (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Muscarinic; GPCR; Receptor trafficking; Ubiquitination; Internalization; Down-regulation; Muscarinic receptors; Acetylcholine Receptors; Biological control systems

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jones, K. T. (2007). The role of beta-arrestin in regulating the muscarinic acetylcholine type II receptor. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24815

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jones, Kymry Thereasa. “The role of beta-arrestin in regulating the muscarinic acetylcholine type II receptor.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24815.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jones, Kymry Thereasa. “The role of beta-arrestin in regulating the muscarinic acetylcholine type II receptor.” 2007. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Jones KT. The role of beta-arrestin in regulating the muscarinic acetylcholine type II receptor. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24815.

Council of Science Editors:

Jones KT. The role of beta-arrestin in regulating the muscarinic acetylcholine type II receptor. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24815

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