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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Mark T. Smith"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Chawla, Ravi. Power-efficient analog systems to perform signal-processing using floating-gate MOS device for portable applications.

Degree: PhD, Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2005, Georgia Tech

Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) have been an important component of all signal processing systems for over two decades now. Some of the obvious advantages of digital signal processing are the flexibility to make specific changes in the processing functions through hardware or software programming, faster processing speeds of the DSPs, cheaper storage, and retrieval of digital information and lower sensitivity to electrical noise. The explosive growth of wireless and signal processing applications has resulted in an increasing demand for such systems with low cost, low power consumption, and small form factors. With high – level of integration to single – chip systems, power consumption becomes a very important concern to be addressed. Intermediate – Frequency (IF) band signal processing requires the use of an array of DSPs, operating in parallel, to meet the speed requirements. This is a power intensive approach and makes use of certain communication schemes impractical in applications where power budget is limited. The front – end ADC and back – end DAC converters required in these systems become expensive when the signal is of wideband nature and a greater resolution is required. We present techniques to use floating – gate devices to implement signal processing systems in the analog domain in a power efficient and cost effective manner. Use of floating – gate devices mitigates key limitations in analog signal processing such as the lack of flexibility to specific changes in processing functions and the lack of programmability. This will impact the way a variety of signal processing systems are designed currently. It also enables array signal processing to be done in an area efficient manner. As will be shown through sample applications, this methodology promises to replace expensive wideband ADC and DAC converters with relatively easy to implement baseband data converters and an array of power intensive high speed DSPs with baseband DSPs. This approach is especially beneficial for portable systems where a lot of applications are running from a single battery. Advisors/Committee Members: Joy Laskar (Committee Chair), Dave Anderson (Committee Member), Mark T. Smith (Committee Member), Paul Hasler (Committee Member), Phil Allen (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Floating gate systems

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chawla, R. (2005). Power-efficient analog systems to perform signal-processing using floating-gate MOS device for portable applications. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6823

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chawla, Ravi. “Power-efficient analog systems to perform signal-processing using floating-gate MOS device for portable applications.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6823.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chawla, Ravi. “Power-efficient analog systems to perform signal-processing using floating-gate MOS device for portable applications.” 2005. Web. 28 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Chawla R. Power-efficient analog systems to perform signal-processing using floating-gate MOS device for portable applications. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2020 Oct 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6823.

Council of Science Editors:

Chawla R. Power-efficient analog systems to perform signal-processing using floating-gate MOS device for portable applications. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6823


Georgia Tech

2. Rosen, Gail L. Signal processing for biologically-inspired gradient source localization and DNA sequence analysis.

Degree: PhD, Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2006, Georgia Tech

Biological signal processing can help us gain knowledge about biological complexity, as well as using this knowledge to engineer better systems. Three areas are identified as critical to understanding biology: 1) understanding DNA, 2) examining the overall biological function and 3) evaluating these systems in environmental (ie: turbulent) conditions. DNA is investigated for coding structure and redundancy, and a new tandem repeat region, an indicator of a neurodegenerative disease, is discovered. The linear algebraic framework can be used for further analysis and techniques. The work illustrates how signal processing is a tool to reverse engineer biological systems, and how our better understanding of biology can improve engineering designs. Then, the way a single-cell mobilizes in response to a chemical gradient, known as chemotaxis, is examined. Inspiration from receptor clustering in chemotaxis combined with a Hebbian learning method is shown to improve a gradient-source (chemical/thermal) localization algorithm. The algorithm is implemented, and its performance is evaluated in diffusive and turbulent environments. We then show that sensor cross-correlation can be used in solving chemical localization in difficult turbulent scenarios. This leads into future techniques which can be designed for gradient source tracking. These techniques pave the way for use of biologically-inspired sensor networks in chemical localization. Advisors/Committee Members: Paul Hasler (Committee Chair), David Anderson (Committee Member), James H. McClellan (Committee Member), Mark T. Smith (Committee Member), Oliver Brand (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: DNA analysis; Ficks second law; Hebbian learning; Biased random walk; Sensor cross-correlation; Delay-and-Sum beamforming; Turbulent plumes; Electronic nose; Tandem repeats; Gradient sensing; Bacterial chemotaxis navigation; Chemotaxis; Sensor networks; Signal processing; Biologically-inspired computing; Chemotaxis; Nervous system Degeneration; Nucleotide sequence

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rosen, G. L. (2006). Signal processing for biologically-inspired gradient source localization and DNA sequence analysis. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11628

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rosen, Gail L. “Signal processing for biologically-inspired gradient source localization and DNA sequence analysis.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11628.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rosen, Gail L. “Signal processing for biologically-inspired gradient source localization and DNA sequence analysis.” 2006. Web. 28 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Rosen GL. Signal processing for biologically-inspired gradient source localization and DNA sequence analysis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. [cited 2020 Oct 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11628.

Council of Science Editors:

Rosen GL. Signal processing for biologically-inspired gradient source localization and DNA sequence analysis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11628

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