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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Marion Sewer"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Urs, Aarti N. Reciprocal binding of sphingosine and phosphatidic acid to steroidogenic factor 1 regulates the transcription of CYP17.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2005, Georgia Tech

Steroidogenic factor (SF1) is an orphan nuclear receptor that is essential for steroid hormone-biosynthesis and endocrine development. Recent studies have demonstrated that phospholipids are ligands for SF1. In the present study our aim was to identify endogenous ligands for SF1 and characterize their functional significance in mediating cAMP-dependent transcription of human CYP17. Using mass spectrometry we show that in H295R adrenocortical cells SF1 is bound to sphingosine (SPH) under basal conditions and that cAMP stimulation decreases the amount of SPH bound to the receptor. We also show that silencing both acid and neutral ceramidases using siRNA induces CYP17 mRNA expression, suggesting that SPH acts as an inhibitory ligand. In vitro analysis of ligand binding using scintillation proximity assays show that several sphingolipids and phospholipids, including phosphatidic acid (PA), can compete with [3H]SPH for binding to SF1, suggesting that SF1 may have more than one ligand and binding specificity may change with the changes in intracellular fluxes of phospholipids. Further, phosphatidic acid (PA) induces SF1-dependent transcription of CYP17 reporter constructs. Inhibition of diacyglycerol kinase (DAGK) activity using R59949 and silencing DAGK- expression attenuates SF1-dependent CYP17 transcriptional. We propose that PA is an activating ligand for SF1 and that cAMP-stimulated activation of SF1 takes place by displacement of SPH. Advisors/Committee Members: Marion Sewer (Committee Chair), Alfred Merrill (Committee Member), Donald Doyle (Committee Member), Harish Radhakrishna (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: CYP17; Sphingosine; Phosphatidic acids; Steroidogenic factor 1; Transcription factors; Steroid hormones Synthesis; Sphingosine; Pregnenolone; Phospholipids; Ligands

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APA (6th Edition):

Urs, A. N. (2005). Reciprocal binding of sphingosine and phosphatidic acid to steroidogenic factor 1 regulates the transcription of CYP17. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7638

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Urs, Aarti N. “Reciprocal binding of sphingosine and phosphatidic acid to steroidogenic factor 1 regulates the transcription of CYP17.” 2005. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7638.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Urs, Aarti N. “Reciprocal binding of sphingosine and phosphatidic acid to steroidogenic factor 1 regulates the transcription of CYP17.” 2005. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Urs AN. Reciprocal binding of sphingosine and phosphatidic acid to steroidogenic factor 1 regulates the transcription of CYP17. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7638.

Council of Science Editors:

Urs AN. Reciprocal binding of sphingosine and phosphatidic acid to steroidogenic factor 1 regulates the transcription of CYP17. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7638


Georgia Tech

2. Hurley, Nicole Elizabeth. Modulating the Functional Contributions of c-Myc to the Human Endothelial Cell Cyclic Strain Response.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2007, Georgia Tech

With each heartbeat, major arteries experience circumferential expansion due to internal pressure changes. This pulsatile force is called cyclic strain and has been implicated in playing a pivotal role in the genetic regulation of vascular physiology and pathology. This dissertation investigates the hypothesis that in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), pathological levels of cyclic strain activate the c-Myc promoter, leading to c-Myc transcription and downstream gene induction. To determine expression and time-dependency of c-Myc in HUVEC, mRNA and protein expression of c-Myc under physiological (6-10% cyclic strain) and pathological conditions (20% cyclic strain) were studied. Both c-Myc mRNA and protein expression increased more than three-fold in HUVEC (P4-P5) cyclically-strained at 20%. This expression occurred in a time-dependent manner, peaking in the 1.5-2 hour range and falling to basal levels by 3 hours. Subsequently, the mechanism of c-Myc transcription was investigated by using specific inhibitors to modulate c-Myc transcriptional activation. These compounds, obtained from the University of Arizona Cancer Center, attenuated cyclic-strain-induced c-Myc transcription by about 50%. Having established this reduction in expression, it was investigated how these effects modulate downstream genes that are regulated by c-Myc. The results indicate that direct targeting of the c-Myc promoter may decrease stretch-induced gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and heat shock protein 60 (HSP60). These findings may help in the development of a novel therapeutic opportunity in vascular diseases. Advisors/Committee Members: Larry McIntire (Committee Chair), Marion Sewer (Committee Member), Ray Vito (Committee Member), Suzanne Eskin (Committee Member), Todd McDevitt (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Drug-eluting stent; Atherosclerosis; Stretching; Blood-vessels Diseases; Cardiovascular system Diseases; Strains and stresses; Myc oncogenes

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hurley, N. E. (2007). Modulating the Functional Contributions of c-Myc to the Human Endothelial Cell Cyclic Strain Response. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19822

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hurley, Nicole Elizabeth. “Modulating the Functional Contributions of c-Myc to the Human Endothelial Cell Cyclic Strain Response.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19822.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hurley, Nicole Elizabeth. “Modulating the Functional Contributions of c-Myc to the Human Endothelial Cell Cyclic Strain Response.” 2007. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Hurley NE. Modulating the Functional Contributions of c-Myc to the Human Endothelial Cell Cyclic Strain Response. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19822.

Council of Science Editors:

Hurley NE. Modulating the Functional Contributions of c-Myc to the Human Endothelial Cell Cyclic Strain Response. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19822


Georgia Tech

3. Kollmeyer, Jessica Elaine. Regulation of Galactosylceramide Biosynthesis.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2006, Georgia Tech

An important branchpoint of mammalian sphingolipid metabolism occurs at the step where ceramides are glycosylated to glucosylceramide (GlcCer) versus galactosylceramide (GalCer), which are precursors of all mammalian glycosphingolipids. Relatively few studies have focused on this branchpoint because these monohexosylceramides are somewhat difficult to resolve chromatographically and because molecular biology tools have only recently become available to follow expression of these genes. The goal of this thesis is to better understand the mechanisms of cell regulation determining galactosylceramide synthesis. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Alfred Merrill Jr. (Committee Chair), Dr. M. Cameron Sullards (Committee Member), Dr. Marion Sewer (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Galacotsylceramide; Glycosphingolipids; Sphingolipids

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kollmeyer, J. E. (2006). Regulation of Galactosylceramide Biosynthesis. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11630

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kollmeyer, Jessica Elaine. “Regulation of Galactosylceramide Biosynthesis.” 2006. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11630.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kollmeyer, Jessica Elaine. “Regulation of Galactosylceramide Biosynthesis.” 2006. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Kollmeyer JE. Regulation of Galactosylceramide Biosynthesis. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2006. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11630.

Council of Science Editors:

Kollmeyer JE. Regulation of Galactosylceramide Biosynthesis. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11630

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