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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Loren Williams"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. He, Christine Yi. Viscous solvents as an environment for nucleic acid replication.

Degree: PhD, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 2017, Georgia Tech

Many hypotheses concerning the nature of early life assume that genetic information was once transferred through the template-directed synthesis of RNA, prior to the evolution of genetically encoded protein synthesis. However, despite more than half a century of research into the chemical origins of nucleic acids, a robust route to the abiotic synthesis of nucleic acid polymers is unclear. In particular, identifying the earliest mechanism for enzyme-free replication of nucleic acids remains an elusive goal. A biophysical problem known as strand inhibition limits copying of a nucleic acid duplex: transferring information from a template sequence in the presence of its complementary strand is inhibited by the stability of the template duplex. Strand inhibition is a major bottleneck in understanding how sustained RNA replication evolved on the early Earth. In this thesis, I describe a robust, prebiotically plausible route to enzyme-free replication of nucleic acids, driven by hot/cool cycles in viscous environments. Viscous solvents enable kinetic trapping of a nucleic acid duplex as single strands, providing a time window for the assembly and ligation of oligonucleotide substrates on the single stranded templates. I have shown that viscous solvents can be utilized to overcome strand inhibition, enabling copying of a gene-length template duplex (>300 nt), a process which is highly unfavorable in aqueous conditions. Additionally, viscosity enables copying of an RNA duplex containing a hammerhead ribozyme motif, suggesting a potential route for the selection and amplification of catalytically active RNA on the prebiotic Earth. Advisors/Committee Members: Grover, Martha (advisor), Hud, Nicholas (committee member), Styczynski, Mark (committee member), Loren Williams (committee member), Henderson, Clifford (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Viscosity; Nucleic acid replication; RNA world; Prebiotic chemistry; Chemical evolution; Origins of life

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

He, C. Y. (2017). Viscous solvents as an environment for nucleic acid replication. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59762

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

He, Christine Yi. “Viscous solvents as an environment for nucleic acid replication.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 26, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59762.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

He, Christine Yi. “Viscous solvents as an environment for nucleic acid replication.” 2017. Web. 26 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

He CY. Viscous solvents as an environment for nucleic acid replication. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59762.

Council of Science Editors:

He CY. Viscous solvents as an environment for nucleic acid replication. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59762


Georgia Tech

2. Capadona, Jeffrey R. Surface-directed assembly of fibrillar extracellular matrices.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2005, Georgia Tech

Biologically-inspired materials have emerged as promising substrates for enhanced repair in various therapeutic and regenerative medicine applications, including nervous and vascular tissues, bone, and cartilage. These strategies focus on the development of materials that integrate well-characterized domains from biomacromolecules to mimic individual functions of the extracellular matrix (ECM), including cell adhesive motifs, growth factor binding sites, and protease sensitivity. A vital property of the ECM is the fibrillar architecture arising from supramolecular assembly. For example, the fibrillar structure of fibronectin (FN) matrices modulates cell cycle progression, migration, gene expression, cell differentiation, and the assembly of other matrix proteins. Current biomaterials do not actively promote deposition and assembly of ECM. In this research, we describe the rational design and investigation of non-fouling biomimetic surfaces in which an oligopeptide sequence (FN13) from the self-assembly domain of FN is tethered to non-fouling substrates. This surface modification directs cell-mediated co-assembly of robust fibrillar FN and type I collagen (COL) matrices reminiscent of ECM, and increases in cell proliferation rates. Furthermore, the effect of this peptide is surface-directed, as addition of the soluble peptide has no effect on matrix assembly. We have also identified a critical surface density of the immobilized peptide to elicit the full activity. These results contribute to the development and design of biomimetic surface modifications that direct cell function for biomedical and biotechnology applications. Advisors/Committee Members: Andres J. Garcia (Committee Chair), David M. Collard (Committee Chair), Elliot Chaikof (Committee Member), Loren Williams (Committee Member), Marcus Weck (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Fibronectin; Biomimetics; Biomaterials; Extracellular matrices; Self-assembled monolayers

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Capadona, J. R. (2005). Surface-directed assembly of fibrillar extracellular matrices. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10575

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Capadona, Jeffrey R. “Surface-directed assembly of fibrillar extracellular matrices.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 26, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10575.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Capadona, Jeffrey R. “Surface-directed assembly of fibrillar extracellular matrices.” 2005. Web. 26 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Capadona JR. Surface-directed assembly of fibrillar extracellular matrices. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2021 Jan 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10575.

Council of Science Editors:

Capadona JR. Surface-directed assembly of fibrillar extracellular matrices. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10575

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