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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Long, Jr., Robert"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Goh, Fernie. The use of perfluorocarbons in encapsulated cell systems: their effect on cell viability and function and their use in noninvasively monitoring the cellular microenvironment.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2011, Georgia Tech

Implantation of tissue engineered pancreatic constructs can provide for a physiologic regulation of blood glucose levels. A major concern in designing such constructs is ensuring sufficient oxygenation of the cells, as oxygen is usually the limiting nutrient affecting cell viability and function. Furthermore, in vivo factors influencing construct oxygenation often lead to implant failure, and are detected primarily on end physiologic effects. The ability of perfluorocarbons (PFCs) to dissolve large amounts of oxygen and their high fluorine content makes these compounds a potentially valuable oxygen delivery tool and good 19F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) markers for dissolved oxygen concentration (DO). Experimental studies and simulations showed that although the addition of 10 vol% PFC increased construct oxygenation, this improvement was minimal and had limited benefits on the growth and function of encapsulated bTC-tet cells under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. A dual PFC method that utilizes 19F NMR spectroscopy was developed to noninvasively monitor DO within a tissue construct and in its surroundings. In vitro studies using an NMR-compatible bioreactor demonstrated the feasibility of this method to monitor the DO within alginate beads containing metabolically active bTC-tet cells, relative to the DO in the culture medium, under perfusion and static conditions. In vivo, the method was capable of acquiring real-time DO measurements in murine models. Measured DO can be correlated with the physiological state of the implant examined post-explantation and was compatible with the therapeutic function of the implant. Advisors/Committee Members: Sambanis, Athanassios (Committee Chair), Long, Jr, Robert (Committee Member), Lu, Hang (Committee Member), Safley, Susan (Committee Member), Simpson, Nicholas (Committee Member), Taite, Lakeshia (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Nuclear magnetic resonance; Tissue engineered constructs; Oxygen; Perfluorocarbon; Tissue engineering; Oxygenators; Alginates; Fluorocarbons

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Goh, F. (2011). The use of perfluorocarbons in encapsulated cell systems: their effect on cell viability and function and their use in noninvasively monitoring the cellular microenvironment. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39560

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Goh, Fernie. “The use of perfluorocarbons in encapsulated cell systems: their effect on cell viability and function and their use in noninvasively monitoring the cellular microenvironment.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed February 25, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39560.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Goh, Fernie. “The use of perfluorocarbons in encapsulated cell systems: their effect on cell viability and function and their use in noninvasively monitoring the cellular microenvironment.” 2011. Web. 25 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Goh F. The use of perfluorocarbons in encapsulated cell systems: their effect on cell viability and function and their use in noninvasively monitoring the cellular microenvironment. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. [cited 2021 Feb 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39560.

Council of Science Editors:

Goh F. The use of perfluorocarbons in encapsulated cell systems: their effect on cell viability and function and their use in noninvasively monitoring the cellular microenvironment. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39560


Georgia Tech

2. Mukherjee, Indra Neil. A rational design approach for the cryopreservation of natural and engineered tissues.

Degree: PhD, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 2008, Georgia Tech

Key to the success of natural and engineered tissues becoming clinically available until needed is their long-term storage at low temperatures. This can be implemented by means of freezing or vitrification. To this end, vitrification offers an attractive approach for tissue banking by forming an amorphous glass both intra- and extracellularly and thereby avoiding the harmful effects of ice formation. Generally, high concentrations of cryoprotectants (CPAs) are used in conjunction with high cooling and warming rates to achieve this. However, hurdles associated with applying this technique include the ability to adequately deliver and remove CPAs due to cellular osmotic and cytotoxic effects as well as achieving adequate cooling and warming rates throughout the tissue to avoid ice formation. The aim of this work was to account for these factors in designing cryopreservation protocols for native and engineered tissues that had intrinsically different characteristics, including tissue size and extracellular matrix properties. The tissues investigated were two types of three-dimensional, cell encapsulated systems consisting of murine insulinomas and murine embryonic stem cells, and native articular cartilage. A mathematical 3-D CPA transport model was developed to predict cell volume excursions and intracellular CPA equilibration and applied to cryopreserve an engineered tissue. This thesis established a systematic methodology to design cryopreservation protocols using experimental measurements and a mathematical model for tissues. Advisors/Committee Members: Sambanis, Athanassios (Committee Chair), Long, Jr., Robert C. (Committee Member), Ludovice, Peter J. (Committee Member), Prausnitz, Mark R. (Committee Member), Song, Ying C. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Cryoprotectant; Cartilage; Pancreatic substitute; Tissue engineering; Cryopreservation; Cryopreservation of organs, tissues, etc

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mukherjee, I. N. (2008). A rational design approach for the cryopreservation of natural and engineered tissues. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/22579

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mukherjee, Indra Neil. “A rational design approach for the cryopreservation of natural and engineered tissues.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed February 25, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/22579.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mukherjee, Indra Neil. “A rational design approach for the cryopreservation of natural and engineered tissues.” 2008. Web. 25 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Mukherjee IN. A rational design approach for the cryopreservation of natural and engineered tissues. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. [cited 2021 Feb 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/22579.

Council of Science Editors:

Mukherjee IN. A rational design approach for the cryopreservation of natural and engineered tissues. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/22579


Georgia Tech

3. Gross, Jeffrey David. Non-invasive Monitoring of Oxygen Concentrations and Metabolic Function in Pancreatic Substitutes.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2007, Georgia Tech

Design and characterization of tissue engineered substitutes rely on robust monitoring techniques that provide information regarding viability and function when exposed to various environmental conditions. In vitro studies permit the direct monitoring of cellular and construct changes because these substitutes remain accessible. However, upon in vivo implantation, changes in cell viability and function are often detected using indirect or invasive methods that make assessing temporal changes challenging. . Thus, the development of non-invasive monitoring modalities may facilitate improved tissue substitute design and, ultimately, clinical outcome. The overall objective of this thesis was to establish a method to monitor and track cells and the cellular environment within a tissue engineered substitute in vitro and in vivo. This was accomplished via 31P NMR spectroscopy and through the incorporation of perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions for the monitoring of DO concentration by 19F NMR spectroscopy. The first aim of this thesis was to develop a method that tracked the state of cells and of the cellular environment within alginate constructs during perfusion studies in which the perfusing medium DO concentrations were changed over time or cells were exposed to a cytotoxic antibiotic. Due to challenges in acquiring DO concentration gradient information within beads, a second aim was to develop a mathematical model that would calculate gradients from experimentally acquired volume averaged DO concentrations; thus, significantly enhancing the robustness of tracking the alginate beads. Lastly, since the PFC emulsions used in the study may affect cell viability and function, a third aim was to characterize, experimentally and via modeling, the effect of several PFC emulsion concentrations on the encapsulated and946;TC-tet cells. Advisors/Committee Members: Sambanis, Athanassios (Committee Chair), Chaikof, Elliot (Committee Member), Constantinidis, Ioannis (Committee Member), Edmondson, Dale (Committee Member), Long, Jr., Robert (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: 19F NMR; Perfluorocarbon; Pancreatic substitute; Oxygen

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gross, J. D. (2007). Non-invasive Monitoring of Oxygen Concentrations and Metabolic Function in Pancreatic Substitutes. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14499

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gross, Jeffrey David. “Non-invasive Monitoring of Oxygen Concentrations and Metabolic Function in Pancreatic Substitutes.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed February 25, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14499.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gross, Jeffrey David. “Non-invasive Monitoring of Oxygen Concentrations and Metabolic Function in Pancreatic Substitutes.” 2007. Web. 25 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Gross JD. Non-invasive Monitoring of Oxygen Concentrations and Metabolic Function in Pancreatic Substitutes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. [cited 2021 Feb 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14499.

Council of Science Editors:

Gross JD. Non-invasive Monitoring of Oxygen Concentrations and Metabolic Function in Pancreatic Substitutes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14499

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