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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Lecy, Jesse"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Van Holm, Eric Joseph. Minor league metropolis: Urban redevelopment surrounding minor league baseball stadiums.

Degree: PhD, Public Policy, 2017, Georgia Tech

Special Activity Generators have been a redevelopment tool utilized by governments in order to revitalize lethargic downtowns. For small and mid-sized cities, minor league baseball stadiums have become a popular anchor development as a type of Special Activity Generator; while sports facilities are well studied, minor league stadiums have not been the focus of significant research. My dissertation uses a sequential explanatory mixed methodology to answer whether minor league baseball stadiums are successful as Special Activity Generators. I first use a quantitative analysis of sixteen stadiums built around the year 2000 that shows a large effect for the areas around the stadium compared to the rest of the city. However, that growth is created by concentrating redevelopment, not creating new activity. Two case studies clarify that the stadiums were critical to the observed redevelopment efforts, but also highly the need for thorough planning and collocated amenities prior to construction in order to maximize the results from the public investment. Advisors/Committee Members: Liu, Cathy (advisor), Lecy, Jesse (committee member), Esnard, Ann-Margaret (committee member), Rogers, Juan (committee member), Hacker, Joseph (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Sports stadiums; Urban redevelopment; Special activity generator

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APA (6th Edition):

Van Holm, E. J. (2017). Minor league metropolis: Urban redevelopment surrounding minor league baseball stadiums. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59805

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Van Holm, Eric Joseph. “Minor league metropolis: Urban redevelopment surrounding minor league baseball stadiums.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed March 07, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59805.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Van Holm, Eric Joseph. “Minor league metropolis: Urban redevelopment surrounding minor league baseball stadiums.” 2017. Web. 07 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Van Holm EJ. Minor league metropolis: Urban redevelopment surrounding minor league baseball stadiums. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 07]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59805.

Council of Science Editors:

Van Holm EJ. Minor league metropolis: Urban redevelopment surrounding minor league baseball stadiums. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59805


Georgia Tech

2. Henderson, Michael Joseph. The locational patterns and socioeconomic effects of the new markets tax credit and low income housing tax credit in distressed metropolitan census tracts.

Degree: PhD, Public Policy, 2018, Georgia Tech

This dissertation investigates the role of two federal place-based programs, the New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) and Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC), as tools for revitalizing distressed communities. The first empirical chapter organizes low-income, high-poverty metropolitan census tracts into a typology based on their demographic, class status, built environment, and location characteristics in 2000. Principal components analysis uncovered three prominent neighborhood dimensions: class status, urbanization, and black socioeconomic isolation. These dimensions were entered into a cluster analysis, which identified ten distinct types of poor metropolitan neighborhoods. NMTC investment, LIHTC investment, and socioeconomic ascent were highly correlated across neighborhood types. This finding supports an assumption made in previous studies that developers, who play an important role in determining where subsidized projects are located, are motivated to seek out areas primed to undergo socioeconomic ascent. The neighborhood dimension describing the degree of urbanization was only baseline variable consistently related to both sources of place-based investment and future socioeconomic ascent, suggesting that developer preferences are informed by observable urbanization-related factors. These findings were then applied to the development of a model for estimating the effects of place-based investment on a neighborhood’s socioeconomic trajectory. I use a variation of propensity score matching allowing for multiple treatment conditions to compare 2000 to 2010 changes in income, poverty, unemployment, and home values between census tracts that received different combinations of investment through (a) both NMTC and LIHTC, (b) NMTC alone, (c) LIHTC alone, and (d) neither program. Findings revealed that the addition of NMTC had a positive impact on socioeconomic trajectories, while adding LIHTC-subsidized housing into a census tract could have a positive, negligible, or negative impact, depending on the comparison condition. Overall, this dissertation contributes to a better understanding of why certain types of poor places may be more likely to benefit from these types of market-driven place-based initiatives than others, and introduces a more integrated and nuanced approach for evaluating programs that operate within shared geographic space to address different facets of neighborhood poverty. Advisors/Committee Members: Liu, Cathy Y. (advisor), Lecy, Jesse D. (committee member), Oakley, Deirdre A. (committee member), Esnard, Ann-Margaret (committee member), Isett, Kimberley R. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Place-based policy; Economic development; Concentrated poverty; Affordable housing; Neighborhood change; Neighborhood typology; Neighborhood revitalization

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APA (6th Edition):

Henderson, M. J. (2018). The locational patterns and socioeconomic effects of the new markets tax credit and low income housing tax credit in distressed metropolitan census tracts. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59851

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Henderson, Michael Joseph. “The locational patterns and socioeconomic effects of the new markets tax credit and low income housing tax credit in distressed metropolitan census tracts.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed March 07, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59851.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Henderson, Michael Joseph. “The locational patterns and socioeconomic effects of the new markets tax credit and low income housing tax credit in distressed metropolitan census tracts.” 2018. Web. 07 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Henderson MJ. The locational patterns and socioeconomic effects of the new markets tax credit and low income housing tax credit in distressed metropolitan census tracts. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 07]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59851.

Council of Science Editors:

Henderson MJ. The locational patterns and socioeconomic effects of the new markets tax credit and low income housing tax credit in distressed metropolitan census tracts. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59851


Georgia Tech

3. Kolenda, Richard Salvatore. Growing an industrial cluster?: Movie production incentives and state film industries.

Degree: PhD, Public Policy, 2017, Georgia Tech

After witnessing the success of Canadian strategies to attract U.S. film production in the 1990s, states and localities began offering financial incentives in an effort to lure film and video production away from their traditional hubs in California and New York (Christopherson & Rightor, 2010). This effort increased dramatically in the 2000s, both in scope and in scale. Production activity can now locate in states offering rebates of up to 40 percent of costs, even if this exceeds their actual tax bills, and all but a handful of states offer some form of tax incentives (Christopherson & Rightor, 2010; Katz & Rosenthal, 2006; National Conference of State Legislatures, 2011; Vock, 2008). While some states may be reducing incentive packages in the current climate of fiscal austerity, others are doubling down on that strategy as an effort to stimulate job growth and increased economic activity. And while most states tout many successes from these programs in both metrics, the question of whether such policies promote long-term sustainable economic development has not been fully answered. First I use theoretical literature to construct a model of sustainable industrial development. I will then test this model using a variety of methods and data sets at the national, and state and county levels. In the following two analytical chapters, I will evaluate the impacts of incentives on state-level employment and firm growth, followed by an assessment of the economic effects of incentives in one such state: Georgia. By using this variety of approaches and units of analysis, I hope to shed light on both the macro- and micro-level impacts such incentives have on the industrial economic development of states. In the first study, I use data from the County Business Patterns (CBP) over the years 2002-2013 to view changes in economic activity by state by the level of incentives offered. Using panel data for industry employment, establishment and occupational employment, I use a fixed and random effects regression models to view the relationship between the presence of incentives and the levels of employment and firms in the film industry of each state. Next, I use Georgia as a case study with which to evaluate the degree to which financial incentives for the motion picture industry can create a sustainable network of local firms and workers. I test these theories by using confidential QCEW data to analyze establishment-level activity and relative locations. The results neither completely confirm nor disprove the hypothesis that attracting mobile productions with state tax incentives can establish a nascent industry and generate long-term employment in a region. However, there is some evidence that the number of years the MPIs are in effect does have a positive impact, especially on establishments and occupations. Additionally, the states’ climate and transportation access relative to Los Angeles and other locations are important factors in building a local industry. Advisors/Committee Members: Liu, Cathy Y. (advisor), Kim, Anna J. (committee member), Lecy, Jesse D. (committee member), Seaman, Bruce A. (committee member), Thomas, John C. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: State tax incentives; Film industry; Motion picture industry; Movie production incentives

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kolenda, R. S. (2017). Growing an industrial cluster?: Movie production incentives and state film industries. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60142

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kolenda, Richard Salvatore. “Growing an industrial cluster?: Movie production incentives and state film industries.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed March 07, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60142.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kolenda, Richard Salvatore. “Growing an industrial cluster?: Movie production incentives and state film industries.” 2017. Web. 07 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Kolenda RS. Growing an industrial cluster?: Movie production incentives and state film industries. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 07]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60142.

Council of Science Editors:

Kolenda RS. Growing an industrial cluster?: Movie production incentives and state film industries. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60142

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