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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Kotlyar, Dan"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Pereira, Gustavo Sigwalt Horn. Applying a nodal diffusion-micro depletion sequence for high-fidelity analysis of sodium cooled fast reactors.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2018, Georgia Tech

Recent developments in the global nuclear industry have led to the need of reactor designs that are not only safe, but also address the challenges involving nuclear waste while producing clean electricity at low costs. One of the designs proposed to fill these requirements is the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), a sodium cooled, metal fuel fast reactor system that uses spent fuel from current light water reactors as part of its energy source. Due to the complex nature of nuclear reactors, extensive modeling of a system must be performed in order to demonstrate the viability of such system. This thesis combines two established reactor modeling techniques in order to efficiently model the ABR core. The computational methods used in this work are Monte Carlo (MC) and nodal diffusion. The MC method is a well-established computational approach for modeling of nuclear systems, and is considered to be very accurate and versatile. However, the MC requires extensive time and computational resources, and its applicability becomes prohibitively expensive when performing analyses of accident scenarios. Meanwhile, the nodal diffusion method requires much fewer resources to perform such analyses, but theoretically the accuracy is compromised due to the simplifications applied to the model. The main focus of the work presented in this thesis revolves around expanding the capabilities of nodal diffusion codes to calculate local isotopic concentrations, activities and decay heat quantities, which is a first-of-a-kind demonstration of the applicability of nodal diffusion codes for such calculations. Establishing this approach allows for the capability of decay heat to be calculated rapidly and efficiently, allowing for the performance of transient analyses in accident scenarios. The work presented in this thesis uses the MC code Serpent as a macroscopic and microscopic cross-section generation tool, and the nodal diffusion code DYN3D for full core analysis of the ABR core. The Serpent-DYN3D code sequence is then applied for various scenarios, including decay heat analysis, and compared to reference MC solutions. It is found that the Serpent DYN3D sequence is an adequate tool for modeling of sodium cooled, metal fuel fast reactors, providing accurate solutions while saving on time and computational resources required. Advisors/Committee Members: Kotlyar, Dan (advisor), Petrovic, Bojan (advisor), Hertel, Nolan (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Nodal diffusion; Nuclear; Fast reactors; Sodium-cooled reactors; Monte Carlo; DYN3D

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APA (6th Edition):

Pereira, G. S. H. (2018). Applying a nodal diffusion-micro depletion sequence for high-fidelity analysis of sodium cooled fast reactors. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60820

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pereira, Gustavo Sigwalt Horn. “Applying a nodal diffusion-micro depletion sequence for high-fidelity analysis of sodium cooled fast reactors.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed March 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60820.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pereira, Gustavo Sigwalt Horn. “Applying a nodal diffusion-micro depletion sequence for high-fidelity analysis of sodium cooled fast reactors.” 2018. Web. 23 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Pereira GSH. Applying a nodal diffusion-micro depletion sequence for high-fidelity analysis of sodium cooled fast reactors. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60820.

Council of Science Editors:

Pereira GSH. Applying a nodal diffusion-micro depletion sequence for high-fidelity analysis of sodium cooled fast reactors. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60820

2. Mehta, Vedant Kiritkumar. Spectral shift operated smAHTR to improve cycle length and discharge burnup simultaneously.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2018, Georgia Tech

Fluoride High Temperature Reactors (FHRs) are envisioned to be next generation reactors due to their inherent safety design characteristics and high efficiency from their use of salt-based coolants. FHRs use TRistructural-Isotropic (TRISO) fuel for its benefits of encapturing fission gases and fission products in its layers. One of the main disadvantages of using TRISO fuel is that its fabrication costs are a lot higher (in range of 5,000-30,000 per 𝑘𝑔 Uranium) compared to current pellet-based fuel (300 per 𝑘𝑔 Uranium). In this study, we propose and develop a spectral shift method to operate this type of reactors. This spectral shift method is based on varying neutron energy spectrum. As a result, both cycle length and discharge burnup are improved simultaneously while eliminating the need of burnable poison. Advisors/Committee Members: Kotlyar, Dan (advisor), Petrovic, Bojan (committee member), Deo, Chaitanya (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Spectral shift; Nuclear reactor; SmAHTR; Tri-isotropic (TRISO)

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APA (6th Edition):

Mehta, V. K. (2018). Spectral shift operated smAHTR to improve cycle length and discharge burnup simultaneously. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60832

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mehta, Vedant Kiritkumar. “Spectral shift operated smAHTR to improve cycle length and discharge burnup simultaneously.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed March 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60832.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mehta, Vedant Kiritkumar. “Spectral shift operated smAHTR to improve cycle length and discharge burnup simultaneously.” 2018. Web. 23 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Mehta VK. Spectral shift operated smAHTR to improve cycle length and discharge burnup simultaneously. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60832.

Council of Science Editors:

Mehta VK. Spectral shift operated smAHTR to improve cycle length and discharge burnup simultaneously. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60832


Georgia Tech

3. Maronati, Giovanni. Explaining large observed variation in construction cost of nuclear power plants through correlated random variables.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2018, Georgia Tech

The high overnight capital cost (OCC), as well as the large delays and cost escalation during construction, make nuclear reactors unattractive for investors. The history of nuclear power plants construction in the US shows the necessity to properly estimate construction costs and cost uncertainty and contingency. Uncertainties during construction can be classified as “known unknowns” and “unknown unknowns”. Project managers use tools to describe “known unknowns”, while “unknown unknowns”, due to their inherent nature, are not knowable. In this work, the cost trends in the various countries with nuclear power plants are analyzed. For the US data, the costs and the construction schedule of a four-loop PWR (PWR12) are also described in detail. A deterministic methodology, called EVAL, was developed to describe the construction of a nuclear power and then applied to the Westinghouse SMR. EVAL is based on a methodological approach that can evaluate construction cost for an entire Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). EVAL was applied to assess and compare different construction strategies for the Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (WEC-SMR) nuclear island and was used to demonstrate and quantify the benefits of modularization. For this NPP design, modularization allows a 42% decrease in TCIC as compared to standard construction techniques (stick-built construction). EVAL was used to evaluate the effect of several decision variables on TCIC through sensitivity analyses. Specifically, the effect on construction costs of the discount rate, the size of the on-site assembly area, the use of different welding technologies, and testing was evaluated for the nuclear island of the WEC-SMR. A methodology to perform stochastic analyses through Iman-Conover method to account for correlation between costs and activities is also presented. A probabilistic assessment is then performed for the construction of a fully-modularized SMR and a stick-built PWR12. The results show an improved prediction capability of TCIC uncertainty as correlations between variables are taken into account. The inputs of the model are then modified to be consistent with the cost history in the US for PWR12. The trend in the US before 1979 is used to adjust the model inputs to describe a stable nuclear era. The trend after 1979 is used to quantify, a posteriori, the impact of “unknown unknowns”, representing regulatory changes during construction, resulting in cost and cost uncertainty increase. With the inputs derived from the pre-1979 data, the TCIC mean value for the PWR12-BE is 2.5 B, with a contingency of 995.5 M, which corresponds to 39.8% of the TCIC mean. Similar results were obtained for the SMR, where cost contingency is 42.0% of the TCIC expected value. Regarding the project duration, the SMR relative standard deviation is 9.5%, 10% lower than that of the PWR12-BE. If the unknown unknowns are taken into account, the PWR12-BE cost contingency is 128% of the TCIC mean derived for the pre-1979 case. For the SMR, the cost contingency relative to the TCIC mean… Advisors/Committee Members: Petrovic, Bojan (advisor), Kotlyar, Dan (advisor), Hertel, Nolan E. (committee member), White, Chelsea C. (committee member), Ferroni, Paolo (committee member), Van Wyk, Jurie J. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: NPP; Economics; NPP economics; Cost; Finance; Nuclear energy; Nuclear power plants; SMR; Contingency; Risk; Correlated variables; Cost uncertainty

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Maronati, G. (2018). Explaining large observed variation in construction cost of nuclear power plants through correlated random variables. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59904

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Maronati, Giovanni. “Explaining large observed variation in construction cost of nuclear power plants through correlated random variables.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed March 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59904.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Maronati, Giovanni. “Explaining large observed variation in construction cost of nuclear power plants through correlated random variables.” 2018. Web. 23 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Maronati G. Explaining large observed variation in construction cost of nuclear power plants through correlated random variables. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59904.

Council of Science Editors:

Maronati G. Explaining large observed variation in construction cost of nuclear power plants through correlated random variables. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59904

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