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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Katherine Willoughby"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Gomez Reino, Juan Luis. Essays on optimal jurisdictional size for local service delivery.

Degree: PhD, Public Policy, 2010, Georgia Tech

This dissertation contributes to the definition of an analytical framework for the study of optimal jurisdictional size for local service delivery. We argue that the standard economics framework for the analysis of optimal jurisdictional size importantly neglects individual preferences for political accountability. Our theoretical model shows that once we take into account such preferences, the optimal jurisdictional size for the provision of local public goods is smaller than in the standard model. We obtain empirical evidence to support our hypothesis from a sample of 197 countries. Our results show that, in fact, demand for political accountability leads to higher jurisdictional fragmentation both in terms of greater number of jurisdictions and smaller average population per jurisdiction. In addition, a meta-analysis of the empirical contributions to the study of economies of scale in the provision of local services shows that the economies of scale expected from service provision to larger jurisdictional sizes may not be present except for a handful of local services, and limited to relatively small population sizes. The results of the meta-analysis signal moderately increasing to constant returns to scale in the provision of traditional local services. In light of these results, we argue that forced jurisdictional consolidation programs across the world justified by perceptions of excessive jurisdictional fragmentation, or by the expectation of large expenditure savings due to economies of scale may have been, thus, erroneously designed. From a policy perspective, multi-layered institutional frameworks for service delivery (including cooperation and privatization among other options) may allow targeting available efficiency gains more efficiently than consolidation. Advisors/Committee Members: Jorge L. Martinez-Vazquez (Committee Chair), Francois Vaillancourt (Committee Member), James Alm (Committee Member), Jenny Ligthart (Committee Member), Juan Rogers (Committee Member), Katherine Willoughby (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Territorial fragmentation; Economies of scale; Jurisdictional reform; Fiscal decentralization; Local government; Administrative and political divisions; Decentralization in government

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gomez Reino, J. L. (2010). Essays on optimal jurisdictional size for local service delivery. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/34656

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gomez Reino, Juan Luis. “Essays on optimal jurisdictional size for local service delivery.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/34656.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gomez Reino, Juan Luis. “Essays on optimal jurisdictional size for local service delivery.” 2010. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Gomez Reino JL. Essays on optimal jurisdictional size for local service delivery. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2010. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/34656.

Council of Science Editors:

Gomez Reino JL. Essays on optimal jurisdictional size for local service delivery. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/34656


Georgia Tech

2. Kim, Jungbu. Do Different Expenditure Mechanisms Invite Different Influences? Evidence from Research Expenditures of the National Institutes of Health.

Degree: PhD, Public Policy, 2007, Georgia Tech

This study examines 1) whether the different expenditure mechanisms used by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) invite different sources of influences on the budget process and thus on the expenditure outcomes and 2) whether the frequent use of omnibus appropriations bills since 1996 has changed budget levels of the institutes under the NIH. The NIH uses two major expenditure mechanisms with very different beneficiary groups: the principal investigator-initiated Research Project Grants and Intramural Research. Drawing on theories of motivations of public officials and of political clout of agency heads and considering empirical studies of the effect of omnibus legislation, this study reveals the following: 1) directors with more public service experience are more successful in securing a higher budget for their institutes; 2) while the directors are found to be driven by public service motivation, when it comes to expenditure allocation between two different mechanisms, they behave in a self-interested manner, representing the interests of the institutional sectors where they have developed close relationships; 3) with ever-increasing budgets between 1983 and 2005, the institute directors have chosen to seek higher budgets rather than merely avoid the risk of budget cuts; 4) although the advisory boards are purportedly used to seek private input for the priority setting, they tend to increase intramural more than external research project grant expenditures; 5) the practice of omnibus appropriations bills significantly benefits the institutes under the NIH such that with omnibus legislation the institutes¡¯ total expenditures have more than doubled controlling the other factors; and 6) there are significant differences in the effects of the director¡¯s public experience and the number of advisory boards and their membership both (i) between disease-focused institutes and nondisease institutes and (ii) with and without omnibus legislation. The effects of the director¡¯s public service experience and the advisory boards have more budgetary impact in the general science-focused institutes than in their disease-focused counterparts. The influence of the advisory board and of the institute director¡¯s public service experience on the individual institute¡¯s expenditure level is significantly diminished by the frequent use of omnibus appropriations bills. Advisors/Committee Members: Robert J. Eger, III (Committee Chair), Gregory B. Lewis (Committee Member), John Clayton Thomas (Committee Member), Juan Rogers (Committee Member), Katherine Willoughby (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Omnibus legislation; Public service motivation; National Institutes of Health; Bureaucratic maximization; R&D; Expenditure mechanisms

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kim, J. (2007). Do Different Expenditure Mechanisms Invite Different Influences? Evidence from Research Expenditures of the National Institutes of Health. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16235

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kim, Jungbu. “Do Different Expenditure Mechanisms Invite Different Influences? Evidence from Research Expenditures of the National Institutes of Health.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16235.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kim, Jungbu. “Do Different Expenditure Mechanisms Invite Different Influences? Evidence from Research Expenditures of the National Institutes of Health.” 2007. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Kim J. Do Different Expenditure Mechanisms Invite Different Influences? Evidence from Research Expenditures of the National Institutes of Health. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16235.

Council of Science Editors:

Kim J. Do Different Expenditure Mechanisms Invite Different Influences? Evidence from Research Expenditures of the National Institutes of Health. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16235

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