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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Julia E. Babensee"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Zhong, Yinghui. Development and Characterization of Anti-Inflammatory Coatings for Implanted Neural Probes.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2006, Georgia Tech

Stable single-unit recordings from the nervous system using microelectrode arrays can have significant implications for the treatment of a wide variety of sensory and movement disorders. However, the long-term performance of the implanted neural electrodes is compromised by the formation of glial scar around these devices, which is a typical consequence of the inflammatory tissue reaction to implantation-induced injury in the CNS. The glial scar is inhibitory to neurons and forms a barrier between the electrode and neurons in the surrounding brain tissue. Therefore, to maintain long-term recording stability, reactive gliosis and other inflammatory processes around the electrode need to be minimized. This work has succeeded in the development of neural electrode coatings that are capable of sustained release of anti-inflammatory agents while not adversely affecting the electrical performance of the electrodes. The effects of coating methods, initial drug loadings on release kinetics were investigated to optimize the coatings. The physical properties of the coatings and the bioactivity of released anti-inflammatory agents were characterized. The effect of the coatings on the electrical property of the electrodes was tested. Two candidate anti-inflammatory agents were screened by evaluating their anti-inflammatory potency in vitro. Finally, neural electrodes coated with the anti-inflammatory coatings were implanted into rat brains to assess the anti-inflammatory potential of the coatings in vivo. This work represents a promising approach to attenuate astroglial scar around the implanted silicon neural electrodes, and may provide a promising strategy to improve the long-term recording stability of silicon neural electrodes. Advisors/Committee Members: Ravi V. Bellamkonda (Committee Chair), Julia E. Babensee (Committee Member), Michelle C. LaPlaca (Committee Member), Robert J. McKeon (Committee Member), Todd C. McDevitt (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Neural implant; Drug delivery; Coatings; Inflammation; Glial scar; Nervous system; Electrodes; Implants, Artificial; Foreign-body reaction; Wound healing; Neuroglia; Coatings; Controlled release preparations; Anti-inflammatory agents

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APA (6th Edition):

Zhong, Y. (2006). Development and Characterization of Anti-Inflammatory Coatings for Implanted Neural Probes. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19760

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhong, Yinghui. “Development and Characterization of Anti-Inflammatory Coatings for Implanted Neural Probes.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed September 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19760.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhong, Yinghui. “Development and Characterization of Anti-Inflammatory Coatings for Implanted Neural Probes.” 2006. Web. 20 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Zhong Y. Development and Characterization of Anti-Inflammatory Coatings for Implanted Neural Probes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. [cited 2020 Sep 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19760.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhong Y. Development and Characterization of Anti-Inflammatory Coatings for Implanted Neural Probes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19760


Georgia Tech

2. Wilson, John Tanner. Biomolecular strategies for cell surface engineering.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2009, Georgia Tech

Islet transplantation has emerged as a promising cell-based therapy for the treatment of diabetes, but its clinical efficacy remains limited by deleterious host responses that underlie islet destruction. In this dissertation, we describe the assembly of cell surface-supported thin films that confer molecular-level control over the composition and biophysicochemical properties of the islet surface with implications for improving islet engraftment. Specifically, the process of layer-by-layer (LbL) polymer self assembly was employed to generate nanothin films of diverse architecture with tunable properties directly on the extracellular surface of individual islets. Importantly, these studies are the first to report in vivo survival and function of nanoencapsulated cells, and have helped establish a conceptual framework for translating the diverse applications of LbL films to cellular interfaces. Additionally, through proper design of film constituents, coatings displaying ligands and bioorthogonally reactive handles may be generated, providing a modular strategy for incorporating exogenously derived regulators of host responses alongside native constituents of the islet surface. Towards this end, a strategy was developed to tether thrombomodulin to the islet surface in a site-specific manner, thereby facilitating local generation of the powerful anti-inflammatory agent, activated protein C. Collectively, this work offers novel biomolecular strategies for cell surface engineering with broad biomedical and biotechnological applications in cell-based therapeutics and beyond. Advisors/Committee Members: Elliot L. Chaikof (Committee Chair), Athanassios Sambanis (Committee Member), Clifford L. Henderson (Committee Member), Julia E. Babensee (Committee Member), Larry V. McIntire (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Cell encapsulation; Islet transplantation; Cell surface engineering; Layer-by-layer self assembly; Thrombomodulin; Conformal coating; Cell membranes; Glycoproteins; Islands of Langerhans; Islands of Langerhans Transplantation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wilson, J. T. (2009). Biomolecular strategies for cell surface engineering. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33846

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wilson, John Tanner. “Biomolecular strategies for cell surface engineering.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed September 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33846.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wilson, John Tanner. “Biomolecular strategies for cell surface engineering.” 2009. Web. 20 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Wilson JT. Biomolecular strategies for cell surface engineering. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. [cited 2020 Sep 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33846.

Council of Science Editors:

Wilson JT. Biomolecular strategies for cell surface engineering. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33846


Georgia Tech

3. Byers, Benjamin Allen. In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of a Cell Source for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications: Primary Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Overexpressing the Osteoblast-Specific Transcriptional Activator Runx2/Cbfa1.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2004, Georgia Tech

Bone tissue engineering strategies are currently being developed as alternative mechanisms to address the clinical demand for bioactive and biomechanical graft material. To date, these efforts have been largely restricted by inadequate supply of committed osteoprogenitor cells and loss of osteoblastic phenotype expression following in vitro culture and expansion. The objective of this thesis research was to address the cell sourcing limitations of tissue-engineered bone grafts through constitutive and sustained overexpression of the osteoblast-specific transcriptional activator Runx2/Cbfa1 in osteogenic marrow-derived stromal cells using retroviral gene delivery. Runx2 overexpression enhanced expression of multiple osteoblastic genes proteins and, more importantly, significantly up-regulated matrix mineralization in both monolayer culture and following cell seeding in 3-D polymeric scaffolds. To evaluate in vivo performance, Runx2-expressing cells were seeded into 3-D constructs and implanted both subcutaneously and in a critical size craniotomy bone defect model. Notably, in vitro pre-culture of Runx2-transduced cell-seeded constructs prior to implantation significantly enhanced their capacity to form mineralized tissue in the subcutaneous space and induce new bone formation in the critical size defect model compared to control cells. The described series of analyses provided a novel combination of tissue and genetic engineering techniques toward the development of a Runx2-modified stromal cell/polymeric scaffold composite tissue-engineered bone graft substitute. Advisors/Committee Members: Andres J. Garcia (Committee Chair), Barbara D. Boyan (Committee Member), Grace K. Pavlath (Committee Member), Joseph M. LeDoux (Committee Member), Julia E. Babensee (Committee Member), Robert E. Guldberg (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Mineralization; Stromal cells; Genetic engineering; Runx2/Cbfa1; Tissue engineering; Bone

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Byers, B. A. (2004). In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of a Cell Source for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications: Primary Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Overexpressing the Osteoblast-Specific Transcriptional Activator Runx2/Cbfa1. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5260

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Byers, Benjamin Allen. “In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of a Cell Source for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications: Primary Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Overexpressing the Osteoblast-Specific Transcriptional Activator Runx2/Cbfa1.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed September 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5260.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Byers, Benjamin Allen. “In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of a Cell Source for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications: Primary Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Overexpressing the Osteoblast-Specific Transcriptional Activator Runx2/Cbfa1.” 2004. Web. 20 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Byers BA. In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of a Cell Source for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications: Primary Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Overexpressing the Osteoblast-Specific Transcriptional Activator Runx2/Cbfa1. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. [cited 2020 Sep 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5260.

Council of Science Editors:

Byers BA. In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of a Cell Source for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications: Primary Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Overexpressing the Osteoblast-Specific Transcriptional Activator Runx2/Cbfa1. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5260

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