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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("James Stevenson Kenney"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Munir, Farasat. A fast, scalable acoustic resonator-based biosensor array system for simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers.

Degree: PhD, Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2012, Georgia Tech

This thesis is about the design of a biosensor system for detection of multiple cancer biomarkers. Accurate diagnosis and prognosis of cancer requires early detection. Equally important, though, is the measurement of biomarker-velocity and detection of multiple biomarkers. Early detection requires highly sensitive biosensors capable of detection at very low concentrations of target molecules. Biomarker-velocity can be measured by monitoring concentration of target molecule over a period of time. This requires a system which is very easy to use, fast, flexible, inexpensive and portable, thus enabling its ubiquitous presence at the point of care. For detection of multiplexed biomarkers, biosensors which easily lend to array configuration are required. Conventional techniques do not fulfill either all or some aspects of the requirements listed above. In this work, we present the design of a biosensor system, keeping in view the desired features described above, to achieve the ultimate goal of enabling ubiquitous presence of biosensor at the point of care. We focus on acoustic transducer based biosensors. The two fundamental components of design in an acoustic biosensor are the design of an acoustic transducer and the design of a novel electrical interface for the transducer. For transducer design, we introduce and present the design of a single structure, GHz range, multi-mode acoustic resonator. We present this as a suitable transducer for liquid phase biosensors, which is the preferred medium for sensing of cancer biomarkers. We explore the underlying physics and do experimental and theoretical characterization of this device. The transducer needs to be functionalized with a chemically sensitive layer which performs the molecular recognition of cancer biomarkers. We present the experimental exploration of a reversible and oriented immobilization based Histidine-Ni(2+) interaction which used NTA as the chelator for anchoring onto the device. Then we discuss the microfluidic design to enable liquid phase operation. We used SU-8 polymer barriers for liquid containment and addressed the challenges of making it compatible with ZnO based devices. An electrical interface is needed to excite and extract the sensor response. We have presented here a novel method to measure and track a resonator's response and extract its characteristic parameters. This method measures the wideband frequency response of the resonator with a much simpler setup as compared to conventional methods. We have proposed and demonstrated the use of a white noise signal as a viable signal for broadband excitation of resonator-based sensing platforms. We have also established, shown through simulation and prototype measurements, the feasibility of the proposed method. The accuracy and speed of the system can be further greatly improved by FFT-based digital implementation of the spectral analysis system. We have presented an example hardware implementation of FFT-based signal analyzer, and have discussed the hardware resources required for actual… Advisors/Committee Members: William D. Hunt (Committee Chair), Bruno Frazier (Committee Member), James Stevenson Kenney (Committee Member), Mary Ann Ingram (Committee Member), Nael A McCarty (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Solidly mounted resonator; Hybrid-mode; Su-8; Noise excitation; Resonator interface; Mulit-mode; Biosensors; Acoustic resonator; BAW; Biosensors; Biochemical markers; Tumor markers

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APA (6th Edition):

Munir, F. (2012). A fast, scalable acoustic resonator-based biosensor array system for simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47712

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Munir, Farasat. “A fast, scalable acoustic resonator-based biosensor array system for simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 21, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47712.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Munir, Farasat. “A fast, scalable acoustic resonator-based biosensor array system for simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers.” 2012. Web. 21 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Munir F. A fast, scalable acoustic resonator-based biosensor array system for simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2012. [cited 2020 Jan 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47712.

Council of Science Editors:

Munir F. A fast, scalable acoustic resonator-based biosensor array system for simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47712


Georgia Tech

2. McKinley, Michael Dean. Improved frequency domain measurement techniques for characterizing power amplifier and multipath environments.

Degree: PhD, Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2008, Georgia Tech

This work focuses on fixing measurement inaccuracies to which models and figures of merit are susceptible in two wireless communication environments: power amplifier and multipath. To emulate or rate the performance of these environments, models and figures of merit, respectively, are often used. The usefulness of a model depends on how accurately and efficiently it emulates its real-world counterpart. The usefulness of a figure of merit depends on how accurately it represents system behavior. Most discussions on the challenges and trade-offs faced in modeling nearly always focus on the complexity of the device or channel of interest and the resultant difficulty in describing it. Similarly, figures of merit are meant only to summarize the performance of the device or channel. At some point, either in generation or verification of a model or figure of merit, there is a dependence on measured data. Though the complexity and performance of the device or channel are challenges by themselves, there are other significant sources of distortion that must be minimized to avoid errors in the measured data. For this work, the unique distortion of power amplifier and multipath environments is considered, and then errors in measurement which would obscure these distortions are eliminated. Specifically, three measurement issues are addressed: 1) identifying measurement setup artifacts, 2) achieving consistent measurement results and 3) reducing variations in the environment. This work contributes to increasing the accuracy of microwave measurements used in the modeling of nonlinear high-power amplifiers and used in figures of merit for power amplifiers and multipath channels. Advisors/Committee Members: James Stevenson Kenney (Committee Chair), Gregory David Durgin (Committee Member), Madhavan Swaminathan (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: CDMA; Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing; Code division multiple access; Multisine error vector magnitude; Multisine; OFDM; Wiener; Parallel Wiener; Memory; Class AB; Two tone measurement; Asymmetry; IMD; Intermodulation distortion; Spectral leakage; VSA; Vector signal analyzer; Rayleigh; Rice; Gauss; Power amplifier; Multipath; Measurement; Microwave; Error vector magnitude; Wireless communication systems; Microwave measurements; Amplifiers (Electronics); Simulation methods

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McKinley, M. D. (2008). Improved frequency domain measurement techniques for characterizing power amplifier and multipath environments. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24722

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McKinley, Michael Dean. “Improved frequency domain measurement techniques for characterizing power amplifier and multipath environments.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 21, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24722.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McKinley, Michael Dean. “Improved frequency domain measurement techniques for characterizing power amplifier and multipath environments.” 2008. Web. 21 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

McKinley MD. Improved frequency domain measurement techniques for characterizing power amplifier and multipath environments. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. [cited 2020 Jan 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24722.

Council of Science Editors:

McKinley MD. Improved frequency domain measurement techniques for characterizing power amplifier and multipath environments. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24722


Georgia Tech

3. Shi, Kun. Nonlinear acoustic echo cancellation.

Degree: PhD, Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2008, Georgia Tech

The objective of this research is to presents new acoustic echo cancellation design methods that can effectively work in the nonlinear environment. Acoustic echo is an annoying issue for voice communication systems. Because of room acoustics and delay in the transmission path, echoes affect the sound quality and may hamper communications. Acoustic echo cancellers (AECs) are employed to remove the acoustic echo while keeping full-duplex communications. AEC designs face a variety of challenges, including long room impulse response, acoustic path nonlinearity, ambient noise, and double-talk situation. We investigate two parts of echo canceller design: echo cancellation algorithm design and control logic algorithm design. In the first part, our work focuses on the nonlinear adaptive and fast-convergence algorithms. We investigate three different structures: predistortion linearization, cascade structure, and nonlinear residual echo suppressor. Specifically, we are interested in the coherence function, since it provides a means for quantifying linear association between two stationary random processes. By using the coherence as a criterion to design the nonlinear echo canceller in the system, our method guarantees the algorithm stability and leads to a faster convergence rate. In the second part, our work focuses on the robustness of AECs in the presence of interference. With regard to the near-end speech, we investigate the double-talk detector (DTD) design in conjunction with nonlinear AECs. Specifically, we propose to design a DTD based on the mutual information (MI). We show that the advantage of the MI-based method, when compared with the existing methods, is that it is applicable to both the linear and nonlinear scenarios. With respect to the background noise, we propose a variable step-size and variable tap-length least mean square (LMS) algorithm. Based on the fact that the room impulse response usually exhibits an exponential decay power profile in acoustic echo cancellation applications, the proposed method finds optimal step size and tap length at each iteration. Thus, it achieves faster convergence rate and better steady-state performance. We show a number of experimental results to illustrate the performance of the proposed algorithms. Advisors/Committee Members: G. Tong Zhou (Committee Chair), Xiaoli Ma (Committee Co-Chair), David V. Anderson (Committee Member), James Stevenson Kenney (Committee Member), Liang Peng (Committee Member), William D. Hunt (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Acoustic echo cancellation; Adaptive filter; Nonlinearity; Nonlinear acoustic echo; Double-talk detection; Step-size control; Echo suppression (Telecommunication); Acoustical engineering; Speech processing systems; Nonlinear acoustics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shi, K. (2008). Nonlinear acoustic echo cancellation. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/26704

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shi, Kun. “Nonlinear acoustic echo cancellation.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 21, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/26704.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shi, Kun. “Nonlinear acoustic echo cancellation.” 2008. Web. 21 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Shi K. Nonlinear acoustic echo cancellation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. [cited 2020 Jan 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/26704.

Council of Science Editors:

Shi K. Nonlinear acoustic echo cancellation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/26704

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