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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Hacker, Joseph"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Van Holm, Eric Joseph. Minor league metropolis: Urban redevelopment surrounding minor league baseball stadiums.

Degree: PhD, Public Policy, 2017, Georgia Tech

Special Activity Generators have been a redevelopment tool utilized by governments in order to revitalize lethargic downtowns. For small and mid-sized cities, minor league baseball stadiums have become a popular anchor development as a type of Special Activity Generator; while sports facilities are well studied, minor league stadiums have not been the focus of significant research. My dissertation uses a sequential explanatory mixed methodology to answer whether minor league baseball stadiums are successful as Special Activity Generators. I first use a quantitative analysis of sixteen stadiums built around the year 2000 that shows a large effect for the areas around the stadium compared to the rest of the city. However, that growth is created by concentrating redevelopment, not creating new activity. Two case studies clarify that the stadiums were critical to the observed redevelopment efforts, but also highly the need for thorough planning and collocated amenities prior to construction in order to maximize the results from the public investment. Advisors/Committee Members: Liu, Cathy (advisor), Lecy, Jesse (committee member), Esnard, Ann-Margaret (committee member), Rogers, Juan (committee member), Hacker, Joseph (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Sports stadiums; Urban redevelopment; Special activity generator

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Van Holm, E. J. (2017). Minor league metropolis: Urban redevelopment surrounding minor league baseball stadiums. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59805

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Van Holm, Eric Joseph. “Minor league metropolis: Urban redevelopment surrounding minor league baseball stadiums.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59805.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Van Holm, Eric Joseph. “Minor league metropolis: Urban redevelopment surrounding minor league baseball stadiums.” 2017. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Van Holm EJ. Minor league metropolis: Urban redevelopment surrounding minor league baseball stadiums. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59805.

Council of Science Editors:

Van Holm EJ. Minor league metropolis: Urban redevelopment surrounding minor league baseball stadiums. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59805

2. Wyczalkowski, Christopher Kajetan. Evaluation of the effect of rail intra-urban transit stations on neighborhood change.

Degree: PhD, Public Policy, 2017, Georgia Tech

Development of heavy rail intra-urban public transportation systems is an economically expensive policy tool for State and Local Governments that is often justified with the promise of economic development and neighborhood revitalization around station areas. However, the literature on the effects of rail intra-urban transit stations on neighborhoods is relatively thin, particularly on the socioeconomic effects. This quasi-experimental study evaluated the effect of heavy rail intra-urban transit stations on surrounding neighborhoods, using Atlanta, Georgia and its transit authority, the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA), as a case study. Atlanta is an expansive American city, with a large public transportation system, but low population density and no large-scale policies promoting growth around MARTA rail stations. The study period, 1970 to 2014, covers the entire period of MARTA’s existence – stations opened between 1979 and 2000. Neighborhood change was operationalized with a neighborhood change index (NCI), built on the Neighborhood Life-Cycle framework, with an adaptation that incorporates both the filtering (negative NCI) and gentrification (positive NCI) models of neighborhood change. The study differentiates between an initial effect of new MARTA rail stations, and a long-term effect. Control groups were formed using one and three mile buffers, as well as a matching strategy. Difference-in-difference (DID) models find very little evidence of a positive relationship of NCI with the opening of new MARTA rail stations. The economic recovery that began in 2010 is of special interest for housing research. To address this time-period this study utilized two models, with mixed results. The DID model suggested a negative effect of stations on the NCI. To control for selection bias in the 2010 to 2014 economic time-period, this study utilized propensity score matching to balance the treatment and control group on observed characteristics. A time and tract fixed effects model using the matched treatment and control groups found a significant positive effect of stations on neighborhood change. To test the long-term effect, a time and tract fixed effects model (1970-2014) with the NCI as the dependent variable found a positive NCI effect of MARTA stations on neighborhoods. Therefore, overall, positive neighborhood change (on the NCI scale) can be attributed to MARTA transit stations. Since 2002 MARTA ridership has slightly declined; therefore, the study concludes that given stagnant ridership, lack of supporting policy, and the finding of a positive relationship between MARTA transit stations and gentrification, the stations are a positive amenity, and are a significant contributor to neighborhood change. However, neighborhoods are heterogeneous on many dimensions, and the effect of rail intra-urban transit stations on neighborhoods may depend on the tract’s location, service characteristics, accessibility, and many other unobserved characteristics. Future research will supplement this methodology with… Advisors/Committee Members: Esnard, Ann-Margaret (advisor), Hacker, Joseph F. (committee member), Immergluck, Daniel (committee member), Mangum, Kyle (committee member), Thomas, John C. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Neighborhood change; Public transportation; Filtering; Gentrification; Neighborhood life-cycle

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wyczalkowski, C. K. (2017). Evaluation of the effect of rail intra-urban transit stations on neighborhood change. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60144

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wyczalkowski, Christopher Kajetan. “Evaluation of the effect of rail intra-urban transit stations on neighborhood change.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60144.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wyczalkowski, Christopher Kajetan. “Evaluation of the effect of rail intra-urban transit stations on neighborhood change.” 2017. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Wyczalkowski CK. Evaluation of the effect of rail intra-urban transit stations on neighborhood change. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60144.

Council of Science Editors:

Wyczalkowski CK. Evaluation of the effect of rail intra-urban transit stations on neighborhood change. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60144

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