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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Edmondson, Dale"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Yanto, Yanto. Evaluation of novel enoate reductases as potential biocatalyst for enantiomerically pure compound synthesis.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2011, Georgia Tech

Asymmetric synthesis with biocatalyst has become an increasingly interesting and cost effective manufacturing process in fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and agrochemical intermediates. Enoate reductases from the Old Yellow Enzyme family offer high substrate efficiency, region, stereo-, and enantioselectivity in the catalyzed biotransformations. Asymmetric reduction of activated C=C bond is one of the most widely applied synthetic tools for the potential to generate up to two stereogenic centers in one step reaction. The thesis contributed to the development and characterization of the Old Yellow Enzyme family members including NRSal from Salmonella typhimurium, YersER from Yersinia bercoviei, KYE1 from Kluyveromyces lactis, and XenA from Pseudomonas putida. We explored the possible new chemistry, gathered further understanding of enzymes functionality and biochemistry, evaluated parameters such as enzyme stability, productivity, and selectivity, and improved enzyme specificity through computational guided protein engineering method. In overall, the increasing knowledge about this Old Yellow Enzyme family together with recent advances in biotechnology renders the enoate reductases a tool of choice for industrial applications. Advisors/Committee Members: Bommarius, Andreas (Committee Chair), Edmondson, Dale (Committee Member), Jones, Christopher (Committee Member), Prausnitz, Mark (Committee Member), Spain, Jim (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Biocatalyst; Enoate Reductases; Asymmetric Reduction; Biotechnology; Enzymes; Chiral drugs Synthesis; Alkenes; Reduction (Chemistry); Oxidoreductases

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Yanto, Y. (2011). Evaluation of novel enoate reductases as potential biocatalyst for enantiomerically pure compound synthesis. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39576

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yanto, Yanto. “Evaluation of novel enoate reductases as potential biocatalyst for enantiomerically pure compound synthesis.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed March 07, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39576.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yanto, Yanto. “Evaluation of novel enoate reductases as potential biocatalyst for enantiomerically pure compound synthesis.” 2011. Web. 07 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Yanto Y. Evaluation of novel enoate reductases as potential biocatalyst for enantiomerically pure compound synthesis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. [cited 2021 Mar 07]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39576.

Council of Science Editors:

Yanto Y. Evaluation of novel enoate reductases as potential biocatalyst for enantiomerically pure compound synthesis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39576


Georgia Tech

2. Kim, Sangkyung. Redox cycling for an in-situ enzyme labeled immunoassay on interdigitated array electrodes.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2004, Georgia Tech

This research is directed towards developing a more sensitive and rapid electrochemical sensor for enzyme labeled immunoassays by coupling redox cycling at interdigitated electrode arrays (IDA) with the enzyme label b-galactosidase. Coplanar and comb IDA electrodes with a 2.4 mm gap were fabricated and their redox cycling currents were measured. ANSYS was used to model steady state currents for electrodes with different geometries. Comb IDA electrodes enhanced the signal about 3 times more than the coplanar IDAs, which agreed with the results of the simulation. Magnetic microbead-based enzyme assay, as a typical example of biochemical detection, was done using the comb and coplanar IDAs. The enzymes could be placed close to the sensing electrodes (~10 mm for the comb IDAs) and detection took less than 1 min with a limit of detection of 70 amole of b-galactosidase. We conclude that faster and more sensitive assays can be achieved with the comb IDA. A paramagnetic bead assay has also been demonstrated for detection of bacteriophage MS2, used as a simulant for biothreat viruses, such as small pox. The immunoassay was carried out in a microfluidic format with the IDA, reference and counter electrodes integrated on the same chip. Detection of 90 ng/mL MS2 or 1.5x1010 MS2 particles/mL was demonstrated. Advisors/Committee Members: Hesketh, Peter (Committee Chair), Edmondson, Dale (Committee Member), Frazier, Albert (Committee Member), Hunt, William (Committee Member), Janata, Jiri (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Interdigitated array electrodes; Redox cycling; 4-Aminophenol; B-Galactosidase; Comb IDA; Microchannels; Paramagnetic beads

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kim, S. (2004). Redox cycling for an in-situ enzyme labeled immunoassay on interdigitated array electrodes. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/4790

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kim, Sangkyung. “Redox cycling for an in-situ enzyme labeled immunoassay on interdigitated array electrodes.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed March 07, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/4790.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kim, Sangkyung. “Redox cycling for an in-situ enzyme labeled immunoassay on interdigitated array electrodes.” 2004. Web. 07 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Kim S. Redox cycling for an in-situ enzyme labeled immunoassay on interdigitated array electrodes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. [cited 2021 Mar 07]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/4790.

Council of Science Editors:

Kim S. Redox cycling for an in-situ enzyme labeled immunoassay on interdigitated array electrodes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/4790


Georgia Tech

3. Gross, Jeffrey David. Non-invasive Monitoring of Oxygen Concentrations and Metabolic Function in Pancreatic Substitutes.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2007, Georgia Tech

Design and characterization of tissue engineered substitutes rely on robust monitoring techniques that provide information regarding viability and function when exposed to various environmental conditions. In vitro studies permit the direct monitoring of cellular and construct changes because these substitutes remain accessible. However, upon in vivo implantation, changes in cell viability and function are often detected using indirect or invasive methods that make assessing temporal changes challenging. . Thus, the development of non-invasive monitoring modalities may facilitate improved tissue substitute design and, ultimately, clinical outcome. The overall objective of this thesis was to establish a method to monitor and track cells and the cellular environment within a tissue engineered substitute in vitro and in vivo. This was accomplished via 31P NMR spectroscopy and through the incorporation of perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions for the monitoring of DO concentration by 19F NMR spectroscopy. The first aim of this thesis was to develop a method that tracked the state of cells and of the cellular environment within alginate constructs during perfusion studies in which the perfusing medium DO concentrations were changed over time or cells were exposed to a cytotoxic antibiotic. Due to challenges in acquiring DO concentration gradient information within beads, a second aim was to develop a mathematical model that would calculate gradients from experimentally acquired volume averaged DO concentrations; thus, significantly enhancing the robustness of tracking the alginate beads. Lastly, since the PFC emulsions used in the study may affect cell viability and function, a third aim was to characterize, experimentally and via modeling, the effect of several PFC emulsion concentrations on the encapsulated and946;TC-tet cells. Advisors/Committee Members: Sambanis, Athanassios (Committee Chair), Chaikof, Elliot (Committee Member), Constantinidis, Ioannis (Committee Member), Edmondson, Dale (Committee Member), Long, Jr., Robert (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: 19F NMR; Perfluorocarbon; Pancreatic substitute; Oxygen

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gross, J. D. (2007). Non-invasive Monitoring of Oxygen Concentrations and Metabolic Function in Pancreatic Substitutes. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14499

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gross, Jeffrey David. “Non-invasive Monitoring of Oxygen Concentrations and Metabolic Function in Pancreatic Substitutes.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed March 07, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14499.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gross, Jeffrey David. “Non-invasive Monitoring of Oxygen Concentrations and Metabolic Function in Pancreatic Substitutes.” 2007. Web. 07 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Gross JD. Non-invasive Monitoring of Oxygen Concentrations and Metabolic Function in Pancreatic Substitutes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. [cited 2021 Mar 07]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14499.

Council of Science Editors:

Gross JD. Non-invasive Monitoring of Oxygen Concentrations and Metabolic Function in Pancreatic Substitutes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14499

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