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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Dr. Ronald W. Rousseau"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Amos, Amanda Owings. Regulation of Cytokine-Induced Adhesion Molecule Expression and Sickle Erythrocyte Adhesion to Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Intracellular Adenosine 3',5'-Cyclic Monophosphate and Nitric Oxide.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2006, Georgia Tech

Adhesion of sickle erythrocytes to vascular endothelium may initiate or propagate occlusive events in sickle cell anemia, many of which are accompanied by infection and the associated inflammatory response. Inflammatory markers are also present in sickle patients during asymptomatic periods. Inflammatory cytokines upregulate expression of endothelial adhesion molecules that promote adhesion of sickle erythrocytes. The data in this work demonstrate that after 2 hrs of stimulation with the cytokine TNF- and alpha;, E-selectin, but not VCAM-1 is upregulated on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. After 6 hrs of TNF- and alpha; stimulation, both VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression are upregulated on MECs, and sickle erythrocytes bind to both receptors. Because strategies to control inflammation-associated adhesion in vivo may need to account for both VCAM-1 and E-selectin mediated events, control of intracellular signaling pathways leading to receptor expression is an attractive strategy for inhibiting adhesion. Cyclic AMP and nitric oxide are two intracellular signaling molecules important to cytokine-induced receptor expression. The data in this work demonstrate that TNF- and alpha; induced VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression on endothelial cells and sickle erythrocyte adhesion are abated by increasing endothelial cyclic AMP concentrations using Forskolin, IBMX, or Bt2cAMP. Conversely, when sickle erythrocytes, rather than endothelial cells, are treated with reagents that increase intracellular cAMP, adhesion to unstimulated endothelial cells is increased in some patients. Treatment of endothelial cells with reagents such as SNP and DETA-NO that increase nitric oxide significantly inhibits VCAM-1, but not E-selectin expression, induced by TNF- and alpha; stimulation and significantly inhibits sickle erythrocyte adhesion. Treatment of sickle erythrocytes directly with these reagents may also inhibit adhesion. Together these data suggest that cAMP- and nitric oxide-dependent signaling are useful therapeutic targets to inhibit cytokine-induced sickle erythrocyte adhesion to endothelium. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Timothy M. Wick (Committee Chair), Dr. James R. Eckman (Committee Member), Dr. Larry V. McIntire (Committee Member), Dr. Peter A. Lane (Committee Member), Dr. Ronald W. Rousseau (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Cyclic AMP; Adhesion; Sickle cell anemia; Nitric oxide; Sickle cell anemia; Vascular endothelium; Cell adhesion molecules; Cytokines; Erythrocytes; Inflammation

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APA (6th Edition):

Amos, A. O. (2006). Regulation of Cytokine-Induced Adhesion Molecule Expression and Sickle Erythrocyte Adhesion to Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Intracellular Adenosine 3',5'-Cyclic Monophosphate and Nitric Oxide. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14621

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Amos, Amanda Owings. “Regulation of Cytokine-Induced Adhesion Molecule Expression and Sickle Erythrocyte Adhesion to Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Intracellular Adenosine 3',5'-Cyclic Monophosphate and Nitric Oxide.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed April 14, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14621.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Amos, Amanda Owings. “Regulation of Cytokine-Induced Adhesion Molecule Expression and Sickle Erythrocyte Adhesion to Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Intracellular Adenosine 3',5'-Cyclic Monophosphate and Nitric Oxide.” 2006. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Amos AO. Regulation of Cytokine-Induced Adhesion Molecule Expression and Sickle Erythrocyte Adhesion to Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Intracellular Adenosine 3',5'-Cyclic Monophosphate and Nitric Oxide. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14621.

Council of Science Editors:

Amos AO. Regulation of Cytokine-Induced Adhesion Molecule Expression and Sickle Erythrocyte Adhesion to Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Intracellular Adenosine 3',5'-Cyclic Monophosphate and Nitric Oxide. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14621


Georgia Tech

2. Dumont, George Pierre, Jr. The use of carbonation and fractional evaporative crystallization in the pretreatment of Hanford nuclear wastes.

Degree: MS, Chemical Engineering, 2007, Georgia Tech

The purpose of this work was to explore the use of fractional evaporative crystallization as a technology that can be used to separate medium-curie waste from the Hanford Site tank farms into a high-curie waste stream, which can be sent to a Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), and a low-curie waste stream, which can be sent to Bulk Vitrification. Experimental semi-batch crystallizations of sodium salts from simulant solutions of double-shell tank (DST) feed demonstrated that the recovered crystalline product met the purity requirement for exclusion of cesium and nearly met the requirement on sodium recovery. Batch fractional evaporative crystallization involves the removal of multiple solutes from a feed solution by the progressive achievement of supersaturation (through evaporation) and concomitant nucleation and growth of each species. The slurry collected from each of these crystallization stages was collected and introduced to filtration and washing steps. The product crystals obtained after washing were sampled for analysis by polarized light microscopy (PLM), dried, and sieved. The PLM results aided in identification of species crystallized in each stage. Carbonation was used as a supplemental method to evaporative crystallization in order to increase the sodium recovery in DST experiments. Carbonation was necessary due to the high aluminum ion concentration in the solution, which leads to formation of a viscous gel during evaporation. This gel was avoided by reacting carbon dioxide with hydroxyl ions, which modified the system behavior. Through two stages of carbonation, each followed by evaporation, the effect of carbonation on sodium recovery was demonstrated. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Ronald W. Rousseau (Committee Chair), Dr. Amyn S, Teja (Committee Member), Dr. Wm. James Frederick Jr. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Hanford waste treatment; Polarized light microscopy; Fractional crystallization; Filtration and crystal washing techniques; Aluminum-based gels; Evaporative crystallization; Multi-salt crystallization; Hanford Site (Wash.); Crystallization; Separation (Technology); Evaporation

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APA (6th Edition):

Dumont, George Pierre, J. (2007). The use of carbonation and fractional evaporative crystallization in the pretreatment of Hanford nuclear wastes. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24716

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dumont, George Pierre, Jr. “The use of carbonation and fractional evaporative crystallization in the pretreatment of Hanford nuclear wastes.” 2007. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed April 14, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24716.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dumont, George Pierre, Jr. “The use of carbonation and fractional evaporative crystallization in the pretreatment of Hanford nuclear wastes.” 2007. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Dumont, George Pierre J. The use of carbonation and fractional evaporative crystallization in the pretreatment of Hanford nuclear wastes. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2007. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24716.

Council of Science Editors:

Dumont, George Pierre J. The use of carbonation and fractional evaporative crystallization in the pretreatment of Hanford nuclear wastes. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24716


Georgia Tech

3. Hillock, Alexis Maureen Wrenn. Crosslinkable Polyimide Mixed Matrix Membranes for Natural Gas Purification.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2005, Georgia Tech

Crosslinkable mixed matrix membranes represent an attractive technology that promises both outstanding separation properties and swelling resistance for the purification of natural gas. This approach relies upon dispersal of a CO2/CH4 size-discriminating zeolite in a crosslinkable polymer, which is resistant to CO2 swelling when crosslinked. The resulting membrane has the potential to separate CO2 from CH4 more effectively than traditional pure polymer membranes, while also providing needed membrane stability in the presence of aggressive CO2-contaminated natural gas streams. Control studies are conducted using the pure crosslinkable polymer to observe the separation properties and swelling resistance. Initial crosslinkable mixed matrix membrane experiments are then performed and result in an increase in membrane productivity, instead of the expected increase in selectivity. Traditionally, this is caused by material incompatibility at the polymer/zeolite interface, so the crosslinkable mixed matrix membranes are characterized to examine this issue. During the material characterization, a new non-ideal transport phenomenon is discovered in the zeolite phase. A model is developed to better understand the transport and predict subsequent experimental results. Once the independent materials are proven to be viable, crosslinkable mixed matrix membranes that show enhancements in both efficiency and productivity and exhibit stability in the presence of aggressive CO2 feeds are created. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. William J. Koros (Committee Chair), Dr. Christopher W. Jones (Committee Member), Dr. Haskell W. Beckham (Committee Member), Dr. Ronald W. Rousseau (Committee Member), Dr. Stephen J. Miller (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Crosslinked polyimide; Gas separation; Natural gas purification; Zeolite mesoporosity; Mixed matrix

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hillock, A. M. W. (2005). Crosslinkable Polyimide Mixed Matrix Membranes for Natural Gas Purification. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/13933

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hillock, Alexis Maureen Wrenn. “Crosslinkable Polyimide Mixed Matrix Membranes for Natural Gas Purification.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed April 14, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/13933.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hillock, Alexis Maureen Wrenn. “Crosslinkable Polyimide Mixed Matrix Membranes for Natural Gas Purification.” 2005. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Hillock AMW. Crosslinkable Polyimide Mixed Matrix Membranes for Natural Gas Purification. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/13933.

Council of Science Editors:

Hillock AMW. Crosslinkable Polyimide Mixed Matrix Membranes for Natural Gas Purification. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/13933

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