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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Dr. Robert Nerem"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Simpson, David Lemar. A tissue engineered approach to progenitor cell delivery and myocardial repair.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2009, Georgia Tech

Heart failure accounts for more deaths in the United States than any other pathology. Unfortunately, repairing the heart after pathological injury has become an overwhelming task for physicians and researchers to overcome. Fortunately, cellular cardiomyoplasty has emerged as a promising solution for sufferers of heart failure. Such a therapy is limited in efficacy due to poor engraftment efficiencies, however. To address this issue, we have developed a tissue engineered vehicle for cell delivery. Use of a "cardiac patch" resulted in localized and efficient delivery of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) to infarcted myocardium. Application of a cardiac patch also attenuated adverse remodeling. Additionally, the culture of stem/progenitor cells within three dimensional collagen constructs led to modulations in cell function, which did not promote enhanced angiogenesis in vitro or in vivo. Despite enhanced neovessel formation, hMSC patches were more beneficial at augmenting myocardial repair compared to directly injected hMSC. Lastly, although hMSC represent an effective cell source option for enhancing cardiac repair they require additional purification and expansion steps which inherently delay the turnover before treatment. Therefore, suitable cell alternative are being sought. Human embryonic stem cell derived mesenchymal (B4) cells display several phenotypic similarities to hMSC. B4 progenitor cells responded similarly to hMSC in 3D culture. In addition B4 progenitor cell patch application to infarcted myocardium resulted in similar indices of repair compared to hMSC. Thus, a tissue engineering approach represents an effective cell delivery strategy and induces modulations in cell function which may demonstrate pathological significance. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Samuel C. Dudley, Jr. (Committee Chair), Dr. Marie Csete (Committee Member), Dr. Robert Nerem (Committee Member), Dr. Steven Stice (Committee Member), Dr. Todd McDevitt (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Stem cell; Tissue engineering; Myocardial infarction; Cell delivery; Paracrine; Progenitor cells; Coronary heart disease

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APA (6th Edition):

Simpson, D. L. (2009). A tissue engineered approach to progenitor cell delivery and myocardial repair. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/37187

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Simpson, David Lemar. “A tissue engineered approach to progenitor cell delivery and myocardial repair.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed February 28, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/37187.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Simpson, David Lemar. “A tissue engineered approach to progenitor cell delivery and myocardial repair.” 2009. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Simpson DL. A tissue engineered approach to progenitor cell delivery and myocardial repair. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/37187.

Council of Science Editors:

Simpson DL. A tissue engineered approach to progenitor cell delivery and myocardial repair. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/37187


Georgia Tech

2. Rose, Stacey Loren. In Vitro Model of Vascular Healing in the Presence of Biomaterials.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2006, Georgia Tech

Coronary artery stent placement has been a significant advance in the percutaneous treatment of atherosclerotic disease, and tissue engineered vascular grafts may provide a viable alternative to autologous segments for small diameter vessels. However, in-stent restenosis remains an important limitation, and tissue engineered grafts have poor patency and high risk of thrombus formation due to their inability to maintain a confluent, adherent, and quiescent endothelium. While animal models provide insight into the pathophysiology of these situations, elucidation of the relative importance of stent or graft components, hemodynamic factors, and molecular factors is difficult. Very little research has focused on bridging gaps in knowledge concerning blood/biomaterial interactions, blood/endothelial cell interactions, and endothelial cell/smooth muscle cell cross-talk. The work presented within this thesis will do just that. The objective of this thesis research was to elucidate the influence of biomaterial-induced activation of leukocytes on endothelial cell or smooth muscle cell phenotype, as well as endothelial cell/smooth muscle cell cross-talk in co-culture systems. Towards this goal, two complimentary in vitro endothelial cell/smooth muscle cell co-culture models with divergent smooth muscle cell phenotype were developed and characterized. Using these systems, it was found that the presence of more secretory smooth muscle cells (as would be seen in wound healing or disease) in general enhanced endothelial cell activation in response to biomaterial-pretreated monocytes, while the presence of less secretory smooth muscle cells (to model more quiescent smooth muscle cells found in uninjured healthy vessels) suppressed endothelial cell activation in response to biomaterial-pretreated monocytes (and neutrophils to a small degree). Additionally, biomaterial-pretreated monocytes and neutrophils amplified a smooth muscle cell phenotypic shift away from a more quiescent state. It is likely that the compounding effect of secretory smooth muscle cells and biomaterial-activated leukocytes are responsible for altered vascular wound healing upon implantation of stents or vascular grafts. Understanding the specific signals causing these effects, or signals delivered by contractile smooth muscle cells that limit these effects help to provide design criteria for development of devices or grafts capable of long term patency. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Julia Babensee (Committee Chair), Dr. Elliot Chaikof (Committee Member), Dr. Hanjoong Jo (Committee Member), Dr. Michael Sefton (Committee Member), Dr. Robert Nerem (Committee Member), Dr. Suzanne Eskin (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Biomaterials; Leukocytes; Smooth muscle cells; Endothelial cells; Stents (Surgery); Vascular endothelial growth factors; Biocompatibility; Leucocytes; Regeneration (Biology)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rose, S. L. (2006). In Vitro Model of Vascular Healing in the Presence of Biomaterials. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/13955

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rose, Stacey Loren. “In Vitro Model of Vascular Healing in the Presence of Biomaterials.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed February 28, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/13955.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rose, Stacey Loren. “In Vitro Model of Vascular Healing in the Presence of Biomaterials.” 2006. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Rose SL. In Vitro Model of Vascular Healing in the Presence of Biomaterials. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/13955.

Council of Science Editors:

Rose SL. In Vitro Model of Vascular Healing in the Presence of Biomaterials. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/13955


Georgia Tech

3. Chesla, Scott Edward. Two dimensional (solid phase) kinetic analysis of FCnGamma receptor III (CD16) Interactions with IgG.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2005, Georgia Tech

Cellular adhesion research has recently focused on the small scale at the level of individual receptor-ligand bonds. This trend in research is primarily due to experimental advances which allow such individual bond force measurements. Here, one of these techniques, micromanipulation, has been extended to not only determine the bond force of individual receptor-ligand pairs, but also the intrinsic kinetic rates of the interaction. Using transmembrane (TM ) Fc gamma receptor III (CD16a-TM) and human IgG (hIgG), the dependence of adhesion probability on receptor-ligand expression densities, contract duration and contact area was quantitated. A probabilistic based theoretical formulation was developed and validated that relates the intrinsic molecular kinetic rates of the receptorVligand interaction to the experimentally determined adhesion probability. This theoretical formulation describing individual receptor-ligand kinetics has also allowed direct evaluation of existing biophysical bond strength/kinetics paradigms at the extreme condition of single bonds. A force-displacement model was also developed to quantitate the force exerted on the RBC membrane transducer during the micropipette retraction process and found to be in agreement with previous work. In addition to CD16a-TM, the kinetic rates of CD16a anchored via a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI) moiety (CD16a-GPI) and the two alleles of CD16b (NA1 and NA2) were determined for human, rabbit, and mouse IgG species. The binding affinity of these CD16 interactions to soluble IgG was also measured by traditional bulk chemistry approaches and compared to those measured via the micromanipulation protocol in which the IgG ligand is membrane bound in the solid phase. These data suggest that the membrane anchor itself can alter CD16 binding properties. This represents the first reported effect of the anchor on an intrinsic receptor property, its kinetic rates and binding affinity. This thesis presents two specific aims or goals. These goals were achieved and reported in this thesis. During the course of this research, I also explored other directions and gathered initial data. These directions were further explored by other researchers but the initial data is also presented here. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Cheng Zhu (Committee Chair), Dr. Periasamy Selvaraj (Committee Co-Chair), Dr. Lyle Sinor (Committee Member), Dr. Raymond Vito (Committee Member), Dr. Robert Nerem (Committee Member), Dr. Timothy Wick (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: CD16; Cell receptors; IgG; Immunoglobulin G.; Kinetic analysis; 2D; Two-dimensional solid

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chesla, S. E. (2005). Two dimensional (solid phase) kinetic analysis of FCnGamma receptor III (CD16) Interactions with IgG. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7276

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chesla, Scott Edward. “Two dimensional (solid phase) kinetic analysis of FCnGamma receptor III (CD16) Interactions with IgG.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed February 28, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7276.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chesla, Scott Edward. “Two dimensional (solid phase) kinetic analysis of FCnGamma receptor III (CD16) Interactions with IgG.” 2005. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Chesla SE. Two dimensional (solid phase) kinetic analysis of FCnGamma receptor III (CD16) Interactions with IgG. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7276.

Council of Science Editors:

Chesla SE. Two dimensional (solid phase) kinetic analysis of FCnGamma receptor III (CD16) Interactions with IgG. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7276

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