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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Dr. Robert E. Guldberg"). Showing records 1 – 6 of 6 total matches.

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1. Ngangan, Alyssa V. Bioactive factors secreted by differentiating embryonic stem cells.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2011, Georgia Tech

 Current therapeutic strategies to stimulate endogenous angiogenic processes within injured tissue areas are typically based on introducing exogenous pro-angiogenic molecules or cell populations. Stem cell… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Angiogenesis; Extracellular matrix; Growth factors; Embryonic stem cells; Stem cells; Stem cells Research; Embryonic stem cells Research; Neovascularization

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APA (6th Edition):

Ngangan, A. V. (2011). Bioactive factors secreted by differentiating embryonic stem cells. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/44913

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ngangan, Alyssa V. “Bioactive factors secreted by differentiating embryonic stem cells.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/44913.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ngangan, Alyssa V. “Bioactive factors secreted by differentiating embryonic stem cells.” 2011. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Ngangan AV. Bioactive factors secreted by differentiating embryonic stem cells. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/44913.

Council of Science Editors:

Ngangan AV. Bioactive factors secreted by differentiating embryonic stem cells. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/44913


Georgia Tech

2. Duty, Angel Osborne. Controlled In Vivo Mechanical Stimulation of Bone Repair Constructs.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2004, Georgia Tech

 Bone grafts are used to treat more than 300,000 fracture patients yearly, as well as patients with congenital defects, bone tumors, and those undergoing spinal… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Bone tissue engineering; Bone allografts; Mechanical stimulation; Mesenchymal stem cells

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APA (6th Edition):

Duty, A. O. (2004). Controlled In Vivo Mechanical Stimulation of Bone Repair Constructs. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5222

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Duty, Angel Osborne. “Controlled In Vivo Mechanical Stimulation of Bone Repair Constructs.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5222.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Duty, Angel Osborne. “Controlled In Vivo Mechanical Stimulation of Bone Repair Constructs.” 2004. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Duty AO. Controlled In Vivo Mechanical Stimulation of Bone Repair Constructs. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5222.

Council of Science Editors:

Duty AO. Controlled In Vivo Mechanical Stimulation of Bone Repair Constructs. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5222


Georgia Tech

3. Case, Natasha D. Oscillatory Compressive Loading Effects On Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Undergoing Chondrogenic Differentiation In Hydrogel Suspension.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2005, Georgia Tech

 Articular cartilage functions to maintain joint mobility. The loss of healthy, functional articular cartilage due to osteoarthritis or injury can severely compromise quality of life.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Compressive loading; Mechanical stimulation; Chondrogenic differentiation; Mesenchymal progenitor cell; Alginate; TGF-beta 1

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APA (6th Edition):

Case, N. D. (2005). Oscillatory Compressive Loading Effects On Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Undergoing Chondrogenic Differentiation In Hydrogel Suspension. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6939

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Case, Natasha D. “Oscillatory Compressive Loading Effects On Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Undergoing Chondrogenic Differentiation In Hydrogel Suspension.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6939.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Case, Natasha D. “Oscillatory Compressive Loading Effects On Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Undergoing Chondrogenic Differentiation In Hydrogel Suspension.” 2005. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Case ND. Oscillatory Compressive Loading Effects On Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Undergoing Chondrogenic Differentiation In Hydrogel Suspension. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6939.

Council of Science Editors:

Case ND. Oscillatory Compressive Loading Effects On Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Undergoing Chondrogenic Differentiation In Hydrogel Suspension. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6939


Georgia Tech

4. Palmer, Ashley Wells. Investigations of the Composition-Function Relationships in Normal, Degraded, and Engineered Articular Cartilage Using Epic-Microcomputed Tomography.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2007, Georgia Tech

 Articular cartilage provides a low-friction surface during normal joint motion and distributes forces to the underlying bone. The extracellular matrix (ECM) composition of healthy cartilage… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Articular cartilage; Microcomputed tomography; Cartilage mechanics; Composition-function relationships; Extracellular matrix Mechanical properties; Articular cartilage Mechanical properties; Tomography

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APA (6th Edition):

Palmer, A. W. (2007). Investigations of the Composition-Function Relationships in Normal, Degraded, and Engineered Articular Cartilage Using Epic-Microcomputed Tomography. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14572

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Palmer, Ashley Wells. “Investigations of the Composition-Function Relationships in Normal, Degraded, and Engineered Articular Cartilage Using Epic-Microcomputed Tomography.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14572.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Palmer, Ashley Wells. “Investigations of the Composition-Function Relationships in Normal, Degraded, and Engineered Articular Cartilage Using Epic-Microcomputed Tomography.” 2007. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Palmer AW. Investigations of the Composition-Function Relationships in Normal, Degraded, and Engineered Articular Cartilage Using Epic-Microcomputed Tomography. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14572.

Council of Science Editors:

Palmer AW. Investigations of the Composition-Function Relationships in Normal, Degraded, and Engineered Articular Cartilage Using Epic-Microcomputed Tomography. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14572


Georgia Tech

5. Lowder, Margaret Loraine. Distribution of Stress in Three-Dimensional Models of Human Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaque Based on Acrylic Histologic Sections.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2007, Georgia Tech

 Each year in the United States over a million people experience a myocardial infarction. The majority of these attacks are caused by coronary artery plaque… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Histology; Coronary artery; Finite element model; Atherosclerosis; Three-dimensional reconstruction

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lowder, M. L. (2007). Distribution of Stress in Three-Dimensional Models of Human Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaque Based on Acrylic Histologic Sections. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16137

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lowder, Margaret Loraine. “Distribution of Stress in Three-Dimensional Models of Human Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaque Based on Acrylic Histologic Sections.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16137.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lowder, Margaret Loraine. “Distribution of Stress in Three-Dimensional Models of Human Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaque Based on Acrylic Histologic Sections.” 2007. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Lowder ML. Distribution of Stress in Three-Dimensional Models of Human Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaque Based on Acrylic Histologic Sections. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16137.

Council of Science Editors:

Lowder ML. Distribution of Stress in Three-Dimensional Models of Human Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaque Based on Acrylic Histologic Sections. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16137


Georgia Tech

6. Imler, Stacy Marie. In Vitro Modulation of Meniscus Biosynthesis: a Basis for Understanding Cellular Response to Physiologically Relevant Stimuli.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2005, Georgia Tech

 The meniscus is a soft, fibrocartilaginous tissue critical for the maintenance of normal knee biomechanics, providing shock absorbance and overall joint lubrication and stability. The… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Oscillatory compression; Fibrocartilage; Growth factors; Static compression

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Imler, S. M. (2005). In Vitro Modulation of Meniscus Biosynthesis: a Basis for Understanding Cellular Response to Physiologically Relevant Stimuli. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7281

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Imler, Stacy Marie. “In Vitro Modulation of Meniscus Biosynthesis: a Basis for Understanding Cellular Response to Physiologically Relevant Stimuli.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7281.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Imler, Stacy Marie. “In Vitro Modulation of Meniscus Biosynthesis: a Basis for Understanding Cellular Response to Physiologically Relevant Stimuli.” 2005. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Imler SM. In Vitro Modulation of Meniscus Biosynthesis: a Basis for Understanding Cellular Response to Physiologically Relevant Stimuli. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7281.

Council of Science Editors:

Imler SM. In Vitro Modulation of Meniscus Biosynthesis: a Basis for Understanding Cellular Response to Physiologically Relevant Stimuli. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7281

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