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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Dr. Niren Murthy"). Showing records 1 – 6 of 6 total matches.

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1. Heffernan, Michael John. Biodegradable polymeric delivery systems for protein subunit vaccines.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2008, Georgia Tech

 The prevention and treatment of cancer and infectious diseases requires vaccines that can mediate cytotoxic T lymphocyte-based immunity. A promising strategy is protein subunit vaccines… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Vaccine delivery; Drug delivery; Microencapsulation; Nanospheres; Microspheres; Nanoparticles; Polyacetal; PH-responsive; TLR ligands; Poly(I)-poly(C); Acid-degradable; Vaccines; Polymeric drug delivery systems; Biodegradable plastics

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APA (6th Edition):

Heffernan, M. J. (2008). Biodegradable polymeric delivery systems for protein subunit vaccines. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24787

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Heffernan, Michael John. “Biodegradable polymeric delivery systems for protein subunit vaccines.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24787.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Heffernan, Michael John. “Biodegradable polymeric delivery systems for protein subunit vaccines.” 2008. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Heffernan MJ. Biodegradable polymeric delivery systems for protein subunit vaccines. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24787.

Council of Science Editors:

Heffernan MJ. Biodegradable polymeric delivery systems for protein subunit vaccines. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24787

2. Carpenedo, Richard L. Microsphere-mediated control of embryoid body microenvironments.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2010, Georgia Tech

 Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) hold great promise for treatment of degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The ability of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Microsphere; Retinoic acid; Embryoid body; Embryonic stem cell; Stem cells; Tretinoin; Degeneration (Pathology); Regenerative medicine

…Spain. While work has made up a significant portion of my time at Georgia Tech and in Atlanta… …thank you for all his support. Many friends from my first few years at Georgia Tech have… 

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APA (6th Edition):

Carpenedo, R. L. (2010). Microsphere-mediated control of embryoid body microenvironments. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33948

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Carpenedo, Richard L. “Microsphere-mediated control of embryoid body microenvironments.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33948.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Carpenedo, Richard L. “Microsphere-mediated control of embryoid body microenvironments.” 2010. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Carpenedo RL. Microsphere-mediated control of embryoid body microenvironments. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2010. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33948.

Council of Science Editors:

Carpenedo RL. Microsphere-mediated control of embryoid body microenvironments. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33948


Georgia Tech

3. Gotz, Marion Gabriele. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of irreversible peptidyl inhibitors for clan CA and clan CD cysteine proteases.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2004, Georgia Tech

 Cysteine proteases are a class of proteolytic enzymes, which are involved in a series of metabolic and catabolic processes, such as protein turnover, digestion, blood… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Allyl sulfone; Aza-peptide; Biosynthesis; Cysteine protease; Cysteine proteinases; Irreversible inhibitors; Protease inhibitors; Sulphones; Vinyl sulfone

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APA (6th Edition):

Gotz, M. G. (2004). Design, synthesis, and evaluation of irreversible peptidyl inhibitors for clan CA and clan CD cysteine proteases. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/8072

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gotz, Marion Gabriele. “Design, synthesis, and evaluation of irreversible peptidyl inhibitors for clan CA and clan CD cysteine proteases.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/8072.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gotz, Marion Gabriele. “Design, synthesis, and evaluation of irreversible peptidyl inhibitors for clan CA and clan CD cysteine proteases.” 2004. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Gotz MG. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of irreversible peptidyl inhibitors for clan CA and clan CD cysteine proteases. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/8072.

Council of Science Editors:

Gotz MG. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of irreversible peptidyl inhibitors for clan CA and clan CD cysteine proteases. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/8072


Georgia Tech

4. Foster, Michael Scott. Design, synthesis, kinetic analysis, molecular modeling, and pharmacological evaluation of novel inhibitors of peptide amidation.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2008, Georgia Tech

 Novel, rationally-designed acrylate analogs of various known dipeptide substrates were found to be mechanism-based inactivators of the enzyme peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM, EC 1.14.17.3). This… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Molecular modeling; Stereochemistry; Molecules Models; Peptides; Chemical structure; Peptide hormones; Neuropeptides

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APA (6th Edition):

Foster, M. S. (2008). Design, synthesis, kinetic analysis, molecular modeling, and pharmacological evaluation of novel inhibitors of peptide amidation. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31816

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Foster, Michael Scott. “Design, synthesis, kinetic analysis, molecular modeling, and pharmacological evaluation of novel inhibitors of peptide amidation.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31816.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Foster, Michael Scott. “Design, synthesis, kinetic analysis, molecular modeling, and pharmacological evaluation of novel inhibitors of peptide amidation.” 2008. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Foster MS. Design, synthesis, kinetic analysis, molecular modeling, and pharmacological evaluation of novel inhibitors of peptide amidation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31816.

Council of Science Editors:

Foster MS. Design, synthesis, kinetic analysis, molecular modeling, and pharmacological evaluation of novel inhibitors of peptide amidation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31816


Georgia Tech

5. Nitin, Nitin. Optical and MR Molecular Imaging Probes and Peptide-based Cellular Delivery for RNA Detection in Living Cells.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2005, Georgia Tech

 Detection, imaging and quantification of gene expression in living cells can provide essential information on basic biological issues and disease processes. To establish this technology,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Magnetic nanoparticles; RNA; MRI; Optical; Molecular beacons; Molecular imaging; RNA Detection; Nanoparticles Magnetic properties; Molecular spectroscopy; Molecular probes; Magnetic resonance imaging; Diagnostic imaging

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APA (6th Edition):

Nitin, N. (2005). Optical and MR Molecular Imaging Probes and Peptide-based Cellular Delivery for RNA Detection in Living Cells. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7458

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nitin, Nitin. “Optical and MR Molecular Imaging Probes and Peptide-based Cellular Delivery for RNA Detection in Living Cells.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7458.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nitin, Nitin. “Optical and MR Molecular Imaging Probes and Peptide-based Cellular Delivery for RNA Detection in Living Cells.” 2005. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Nitin N. Optical and MR Molecular Imaging Probes and Peptide-based Cellular Delivery for RNA Detection in Living Cells. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7458.

Council of Science Editors:

Nitin N. Optical and MR Molecular Imaging Probes and Peptide-based Cellular Delivery for RNA Detection in Living Cells. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7458


Georgia Tech

6. Gill, Harvinder Singh. Coated microneedles and microdermabrasion for transdermal delivery.

Degree: PhD, Bioengineering, 2007, Georgia Tech

 The major hurdle in the development of transdermal route as a versatile drug delivery method is the formidable transport barrier provided by the stratum corneum.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Microneedle coatings; Protein delivery; Protein coatings; Hepatitis C virus; Dip coating; Removal of stratum corneum; Microdermabrasion; DNA delivery; Vaccine delivery; Coating formulation; Microfabricated microneedles; Pocketed microneedles; Stainless steel microneedles; Transdermal medication; Drug delivery devices; Skin absorption; Dermabrasion

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gill, H. S. (2007). Coated microneedles and microdermabrasion for transdermal delivery. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24711

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gill, Harvinder Singh. “Coated microneedles and microdermabrasion for transdermal delivery.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24711.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gill, Harvinder Singh. “Coated microneedles and microdermabrasion for transdermal delivery.” 2007. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Gill HS. Coated microneedles and microdermabrasion for transdermal delivery. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24711.

Council of Science Editors:

Gill HS. Coated microneedles and microdermabrasion for transdermal delivery. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24711

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