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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Dr. Mark Prausnitz"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Martinez, Adam W. Design and development of an elastin mimetic stent with therapeutic delivery potential.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2011, Georgia Tech

Stenting remains a common treatment option for atherosclerotic arteries. The main drawback of early stent platforms was restenosis, which has been combated by drug eluting stents; however, these stents have suffered from a higher incidence of late stage thrombosis. To address current stenting limitations, the major research focuses have been the development of the next generation of drug eluting stents and first generation bioabsorbable stents. The main objective of this dissertation was the design and development of a new class of bioabsorbable stent composed of elastin mimetic protein polymers. The first phase explored different stent design schemes and fabrication strategies. Successfully fabricated stents were then mechanically tested to ensure they possessed sufficient mechanical strength. Additionally, described herein is the potential to modulate the properties of the elastin mimetics through different crosslinking strategies. We have demonstrated that chemical crosslinking allows for the tailoring of the physical, mechanical, drug delivery, and endothelialization properties of these materials. The potential for drug delivery from this elastin mimetic stent was benchmarked as was the potential to endothelialize these stents. Furthermore, we developed the necessary delivery systems to allow for deployment in the rat aorta model. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Elliot Chaikof (Committee Chair), Dr. David Harrison (Committee Member), Dr. Mark Allen (Committee Member), Dr. Mark Prausnitz (Committee Member), Dr. Rudy Gleason (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Rat stenting; Elastin miemtic; Laser fabrication; Crosslinking; Drug delivery; Stent; Stents (Surgery); Drug-eluting stents; Drug delivery devices; Implants, Artificial

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Martinez, A. W. (2011). Design and development of an elastin mimetic stent with therapeutic delivery potential. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/45926

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Martinez, Adam W. “Design and development of an elastin mimetic stent with therapeutic delivery potential.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/45926.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Martinez, Adam W. “Design and development of an elastin mimetic stent with therapeutic delivery potential.” 2011. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Martinez AW. Design and development of an elastin mimetic stent with therapeutic delivery potential. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/45926.

Council of Science Editors:

Martinez AW. Design and development of an elastin mimetic stent with therapeutic delivery potential. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/45926

2. Heffernan, Michael John. Biodegradable polymeric delivery systems for protein subunit vaccines.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2008, Georgia Tech

The prevention and treatment of cancer and infectious diseases requires vaccines that can mediate cytotoxic T lymphocyte-based immunity. A promising strategy is protein subunit vaccines composed of purified protein antigens and immunostimulatory adjuvants, such as Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. In this research, we developed two new biodegradable polymeric delivery vehicles for protein antigens and TLR agonists, as model vaccine delivery systems. This work was guided by the central hypothesis that an effective vaccine delivery system would have stimulus-responsive degradation and release, biodegradability into excretable non-acidic degradation products, and the ability to incorporate various TLR-inducing adjuvants. The first vaccine delivery system is a cross-linked polyion complex micelle which efficiently encapsulates proteins, DNA, and RNA. The micelle-based delivery system consists of a block copolymer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(L-lysine), cross-linked by dithiopyridyl side groups to provide transport stability and intracellular release. The second delivery system consists of solid biodegradable microparticles encapsulating proteins, nucleic acids, and hydrophobic compounds. The microparticles are composed of pH-sensitive polyketals, which are a new family of hydrophobic, linear polymers containing backbone ketal linkages. Polyketals are synthesized via a new polymerization method based on the acetal exchange reaction and degrade into non-acidic, excretable degradation products. In addition, the technique of hydrophobic ion pairing was utilized to enhance the encapsulation of ovalbumin, DNA, and RNA in polyketal microparticles via a single emulsion method. Using in vitro and in vivo immunological models, we demonstrated that the micelle- and polyketal-based vaccine delivery systems enhanced the cross-priming of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The model vaccines were composed of ovalbumin antigen and various TLR-inducing adjuvants including CpG-DNA, monophosphoryl lipid A, and dsRNA. The results demonstrate that the cross-linked micelles and polyketal microparticles have considerable potential as delivery systems for protein-based vaccines. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Niren Murthy (Committee Chair), Dr. Carson Meredith (Committee Member), Dr. Julia Babensee (Committee Member), Dr. Mark Prausnitz (Committee Member), Dr. Ravi Bellamkonda (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Vaccine delivery; Drug delivery; Microencapsulation; Nanospheres; Microspheres; Nanoparticles; Polyacetal; PH-responsive; TLR ligands; Poly(I)-poly(C); Acid-degradable; Vaccines; Polymeric drug delivery systems; Biodegradable plastics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Heffernan, M. J. (2008). Biodegradable polymeric delivery systems for protein subunit vaccines. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24787

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Heffernan, Michael John. “Biodegradable polymeric delivery systems for protein subunit vaccines.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24787.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Heffernan, Michael John. “Biodegradable polymeric delivery systems for protein subunit vaccines.” 2008. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Heffernan MJ. Biodegradable polymeric delivery systems for protein subunit vaccines. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24787.

Council of Science Editors:

Heffernan MJ. Biodegradable polymeric delivery systems for protein subunit vaccines. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24787

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