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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Dr. Marcus Weck"). Showing records 1 – 6 of 6 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Wilson, Benn Charles. Silica-Supported Organic Catalysts For The Synthesis Of Biodegradable Polymers.

Degree: MS, Chemical Engineering, 2004, Georgia Tech

 Aliphatic polyesters such as polycaprolactone and polylactide have received more attention in recent years for their use in biomedical applications because of their biodegradable nature.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Organic catalysts; Metal free catalysts; Biodegradable polymers; Lactide; Caprolactone; Silica-supported catalysts; Silica; Polymers in medicine; Catalysts; Biocompatibility

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APA (6th Edition):

Wilson, B. C. (2004). Silica-Supported Organic Catalysts For The Synthesis Of Biodegradable Polymers. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/4918

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wilson, Benn Charles. “Silica-Supported Organic Catalysts For The Synthesis Of Biodegradable Polymers.” 2004. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/4918.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wilson, Benn Charles. “Silica-Supported Organic Catalysts For The Synthesis Of Biodegradable Polymers.” 2004. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Wilson BC. Silica-Supported Organic Catalysts For The Synthesis Of Biodegradable Polymers. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2004. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/4918.

Council of Science Editors:

Wilson BC. Silica-Supported Organic Catalysts For The Synthesis Of Biodegradable Polymers. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/4918


Georgia Tech

2. Vargas, Marian. Design of New Polyester Architectures through Copolymerization, Crosslinking, and Diels-Alder Grafting.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2004, Georgia Tech

 The compound 2,6-anthracenedicarboxylic acid is used as a comonomer for the synthesis of poly(ethylene terephthalate). The resulting copolymers are characterized and further functionalized by Diels-Alder… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Anthracenate; HIQ40; Diels-Alder grafting; Crosslinking; PET; Polyester; Diels-Alder reaction; Polyethylene terephthalate; Copolymers; Crosslinked polymers

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APA (6th Edition):

Vargas, M. (2004). Design of New Polyester Architectures through Copolymerization, Crosslinking, and Diels-Alder Grafting. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5194

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vargas, Marian. “Design of New Polyester Architectures through Copolymerization, Crosslinking, and Diels-Alder Grafting.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5194.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vargas, Marian. “Design of New Polyester Architectures through Copolymerization, Crosslinking, and Diels-Alder Grafting.” 2004. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Vargas M. Design of New Polyester Architectures through Copolymerization, Crosslinking, and Diels-Alder Grafting. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5194.

Council of Science Editors:

Vargas M. Design of New Polyester Architectures through Copolymerization, Crosslinking, and Diels-Alder Grafting. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5194


Georgia Tech

3. Richardson, John Michael. Distinguishing between surface and solution catalysis for palladium catalyzed C-C coupling reactions: use of selective poisons.

Degree: PhD, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 2008, Georgia Tech

 This work focuses on understanding the heterogeneous/homogeneous nature of the catalytic species for a variety of immobilized metal precatalysts used for C-C coupling reactions. These… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Palladium catalysis; Cross coupling reaction; Heterogeneous vs. homogeneous; Selective poisoning; Palladium catalysts; Heterogeneous catalysis; Catalysis; Catalyst poisoning

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APA (6th Edition):

Richardson, J. M. (2008). Distinguishing between surface and solution catalysis for palladium catalyzed C-C coupling reactions: use of selective poisons. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/22704

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Richardson, John Michael. “Distinguishing between surface and solution catalysis for palladium catalyzed C-C coupling reactions: use of selective poisons.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/22704.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Richardson, John Michael. “Distinguishing between surface and solution catalysis for palladium catalyzed C-C coupling reactions: use of selective poisons.” 2008. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Richardson JM. Distinguishing between surface and solution catalysis for palladium catalyzed C-C coupling reactions: use of selective poisons. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/22704.

Council of Science Editors:

Richardson JM. Distinguishing between surface and solution catalysis for palladium catalyzed C-C coupling reactions: use of selective poisons. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/22704


Georgia Tech

4. Das, Prolay. Long-Range Charge Transfer in Plasmid DNA Condensates and DNA-Directed Assembly of Conducting Polymers.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2007, Georgia Tech

 Long-distance radical cation transport was studied in DNA condensates where linearized pUC19 plasmid was ligated to an oligomer and transformed into DNA condensates with spermidine.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: DNA charge transfer; Conducting polymers; Radical cation; Self assembly; Conducting polymers; Charge tranfer in biology; Cations; DNA; Self-organizing systems

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APA (6th Edition):

Das, P. (2007). Long-Range Charge Transfer in Plasmid DNA Condensates and DNA-Directed Assembly of Conducting Polymers. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19856

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Das, Prolay. “Long-Range Charge Transfer in Plasmid DNA Condensates and DNA-Directed Assembly of Conducting Polymers.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19856.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Das, Prolay. “Long-Range Charge Transfer in Plasmid DNA Condensates and DNA-Directed Assembly of Conducting Polymers.” 2007. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Das P. Long-Range Charge Transfer in Plasmid DNA Condensates and DNA-Directed Assembly of Conducting Polymers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19856.

Council of Science Editors:

Das P. Long-Range Charge Transfer in Plasmid DNA Condensates and DNA-Directed Assembly of Conducting Polymers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19856


Georgia Tech

5. Nayak, Satish Prakash. Design, Synthesis and Characterization of Multiresponsive Microgels.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2005, Georgia Tech

 This thesis is geared towards using hydrogel nanoparticles in various biotechnological applications. The polymer that was used in making these nanoparticles was poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), which is… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: pNIPAm; Core/Shell; Nanoparticles; Hydrogels; Polymers; Thin films; Polymers Thermal properties; Polymers Optical properties; Nanoparticles Synthesis; Colloids

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APA (6th Edition):

Nayak, S. P. (2005). Design, Synthesis and Characterization of Multiresponsive Microgels. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6845

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nayak, Satish Prakash. “Design, Synthesis and Characterization of Multiresponsive Microgels.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6845.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nayak, Satish Prakash. “Design, Synthesis and Characterization of Multiresponsive Microgels.” 2005. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Nayak SP. Design, Synthesis and Characterization of Multiresponsive Microgels. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6845.

Council of Science Editors:

Nayak SP. Design, Synthesis and Characterization of Multiresponsive Microgels. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6845


Georgia Tech

6. Shiels, Rebecca Anne. Synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of silica and polymer supported catalysts for the production of fine chemicals.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2008, Georgia Tech

 Catalysis is an important field of study in chemical engineering and chemistry due to its application in a vast number of chemical transformations. Traditionally, catalysts… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Immobilized catalyst; Hydrolytic kinetic resolution; Vanadium; Oxidative kinetic resolution; Cyclic carbonate; SBA-15; Salen; Silica; Catalysts; Catalysis; Schiff bases

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shiels, R. A. (2008). Synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of silica and polymer supported catalysts for the production of fine chemicals. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/29629

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shiels, Rebecca Anne. “Synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of silica and polymer supported catalysts for the production of fine chemicals.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/29629.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shiels, Rebecca Anne. “Synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of silica and polymer supported catalysts for the production of fine chemicals.” 2008. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Shiels RA. Synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of silica and polymer supported catalysts for the production of fine chemicals. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/29629.

Council of Science Editors:

Shiels RA. Synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of silica and polymer supported catalysts for the production of fine chemicals. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/29629

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