Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Dr. Marc E. Levenston"). Showing records 1 – 4 of 4 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Georgia Tech

1. Korkmaz, Lale. Static Force Production Analysis in a 3D Musculoskeletal Model of the Cat Hindlimb.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2004, Georgia Tech

 To understand control strategies employed by the central nervous system (CNS) control movement or force generation in a limb, a seven degree of freedom cat… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Jacobian matrix; Biomechanics; Muscle; Optimization; Cat hindlimb; Musculoskeletal model

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Korkmaz, L. (2004). Static Force Production Analysis in a 3D Musculoskeletal Model of the Cat Hindlimb. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5193

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Korkmaz, Lale. “Static Force Production Analysis in a 3D Musculoskeletal Model of the Cat Hindlimb.” 2004. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5193.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Korkmaz, Lale. “Static Force Production Analysis in a 3D Musculoskeletal Model of the Cat Hindlimb.” 2004. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Korkmaz L. Static Force Production Analysis in a 3D Musculoskeletal Model of the Cat Hindlimb. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2004. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5193.

Council of Science Editors:

Korkmaz L. Static Force Production Analysis in a 3D Musculoskeletal Model of the Cat Hindlimb. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5193


Georgia Tech

2. Case, Natasha D. Oscillatory Compressive Loading Effects On Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Undergoing Chondrogenic Differentiation In Hydrogel Suspension.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2005, Georgia Tech

 Articular cartilage functions to maintain joint mobility. The loss of healthy, functional articular cartilage due to osteoarthritis or injury can severely compromise quality of life.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Compressive loading; Mechanical stimulation; Chondrogenic differentiation; Mesenchymal progenitor cell; Alginate; TGF-beta 1

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Case, N. D. (2005). Oscillatory Compressive Loading Effects On Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Undergoing Chondrogenic Differentiation In Hydrogel Suspension. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6939

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Case, Natasha D. “Oscillatory Compressive Loading Effects On Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Undergoing Chondrogenic Differentiation In Hydrogel Suspension.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6939.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Case, Natasha D. “Oscillatory Compressive Loading Effects On Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Undergoing Chondrogenic Differentiation In Hydrogel Suspension.” 2005. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Case ND. Oscillatory Compressive Loading Effects On Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Undergoing Chondrogenic Differentiation In Hydrogel Suspension. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6939.

Council of Science Editors:

Case ND. Oscillatory Compressive Loading Effects On Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Undergoing Chondrogenic Differentiation In Hydrogel Suspension. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6939


Georgia Tech

3. Palmer, Ashley Wells. Investigations of the Composition-Function Relationships in Normal, Degraded, and Engineered Articular Cartilage Using Epic-Microcomputed Tomography.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2007, Georgia Tech

 Articular cartilage provides a low-friction surface during normal joint motion and distributes forces to the underlying bone. The extracellular matrix (ECM) composition of healthy cartilage… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Articular cartilage; Microcomputed tomography; Cartilage mechanics; Composition-function relationships; Extracellular matrix Mechanical properties; Articular cartilage Mechanical properties; Tomography

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Palmer, A. W. (2007). Investigations of the Composition-Function Relationships in Normal, Degraded, and Engineered Articular Cartilage Using Epic-Microcomputed Tomography. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14572

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Palmer, Ashley Wells. “Investigations of the Composition-Function Relationships in Normal, Degraded, and Engineered Articular Cartilage Using Epic-Microcomputed Tomography.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14572.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Palmer, Ashley Wells. “Investigations of the Composition-Function Relationships in Normal, Degraded, and Engineered Articular Cartilage Using Epic-Microcomputed Tomography.” 2007. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Palmer AW. Investigations of the Composition-Function Relationships in Normal, Degraded, and Engineered Articular Cartilage Using Epic-Microcomputed Tomography. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14572.

Council of Science Editors:

Palmer AW. Investigations of the Composition-Function Relationships in Normal, Degraded, and Engineered Articular Cartilage Using Epic-Microcomputed Tomography. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14572


Georgia Tech

4. Imler, Stacy Marie. In Vitro Modulation of Meniscus Biosynthesis: a Basis for Understanding Cellular Response to Physiologically Relevant Stimuli.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2005, Georgia Tech

 The meniscus is a soft, fibrocartilaginous tissue critical for the maintenance of normal knee biomechanics, providing shock absorbance and overall joint lubrication and stability. The… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Oscillatory compression; Fibrocartilage; Growth factors; Static compression

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Imler, S. M. (2005). In Vitro Modulation of Meniscus Biosynthesis: a Basis for Understanding Cellular Response to Physiologically Relevant Stimuli. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7281

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Imler, Stacy Marie. “In Vitro Modulation of Meniscus Biosynthesis: a Basis for Understanding Cellular Response to Physiologically Relevant Stimuli.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7281.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Imler, Stacy Marie. “In Vitro Modulation of Meniscus Biosynthesis: a Basis for Understanding Cellular Response to Physiologically Relevant Stimuli.” 2005. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Imler SM. In Vitro Modulation of Meniscus Biosynthesis: a Basis for Understanding Cellular Response to Physiologically Relevant Stimuli. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7281.

Council of Science Editors:

Imler SM. In Vitro Modulation of Meniscus Biosynthesis: a Basis for Understanding Cellular Response to Physiologically Relevant Stimuli. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7281

.