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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Dr. John Zhang"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Sanii, Laurie Shireen. Application of Spectroscopy to Protein Characterization.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2005, Georgia Tech

There are two contributions of this thesis. The first contribution, described in chapters one through six, involves studing the relationship between the protein packing structure of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) and its function as a proton pump. In 2002, a novel crystallization method published by Bowie and Farham resulted in an unusual antiparallel monomeric packing structure of bicelle bacteriorhodopsin (bcbR) crystals, the spectroscopic properties of which had not been studied. In this thesis, these bicelle bR crystals are investigated to better understand how the changes in the protein tertiary structure affect the function. Specifically: Does the retinal Schiff base retain its ability to isomerize in this unusual protein packing structure of bR? How is the hydration of its binding pocket affected? Does the protein retain the ability to undergo the photocycle and pump protons? If so, how are the rates of the deprotonation/reprotonation of the Schiff base affected by the antiparallel monomer packing structure of the protein? Is Asp85 still the proton acceptor during the deprotonation process of the photocycle? The second contribution of the thesis, described in chapter seven, describes the surface attachment and growth of the biofilm formed by the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae using attenuated total reflection/Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR/FTIR). This organism was chosen for its clinical significance; it is one of the organisms suspected in forming biofilms in individuals who develop otitis media, one of the most common causes of ear infections of childhood. In contrast to previous ATR/FTIR experiments examining the formation of biofilms on surfaces, this method is unique in that it combines two techniques - ATR/FTIR and Epifluorescence microscopy which when used together allow for the simultaneous monitoring of the IR spectrum of the S. pneumoniae biofilm as it develops and as provides a method for quantifying total and viable cell counts at various stages during the development. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Mostafa El-Sayed (Committee Chair), Charles Liotta (Committee Member), Dr. John Zhang (Committee Member), Dr. Laren Tolbert (Committee Member), Dr. Mohan Srinivasarao (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Bacteriorhodopsin; Bicelle; Crystals; Raman; FTIR; Raman spectroscopy; Spectrum analysis; Bacteriorhodopsin; Crystals; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; Proteins Analysis

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sanii, L. S. (2005). Application of Spectroscopy to Protein Characterization. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7641

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sanii, Laurie Shireen. “Application of Spectroscopy to Protein Characterization.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7641.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sanii, Laurie Shireen. “Application of Spectroscopy to Protein Characterization.” 2005. Web. 15 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Sanii LS. Application of Spectroscopy to Protein Characterization. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2021 Jan 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7641.

Council of Science Editors:

Sanii LS. Application of Spectroscopy to Protein Characterization. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7641


Georgia Tech

2. Scarberry, Kenneth Edward. Biomedical applications of cobalt-spinel ferrite nanoparticles for cancer cell extraction and drug delivery.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2009, Georgia Tech

In this presentation it is demonstrated that the unique magnetic properties of superparamagnetic cobalt-spinel ferrite nanoparticles can be employed in several novel applications. A method to selectively capture and remove pathogens from infected organisms to improve longevity is presented. Evidence is provided to show that automated methods using modified forms of hemofiltration or peritoneal dialysis could be used to eliminate the particle/pathogen or particle/infected cell conjugates from the organism postoperatively. It is shown that disparately functionalized nanoparticles can be used in concert as drug carrier and release mechanisms. Lastly, we provide preliminary evidence to support the use of magnetic nanoparticles for controlling reaction kinetics. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. John Zhang (Committee Chair), Dr. John McDonald (Committee Co-Chair), Dr. Adegboyega Oyelere (Committee Member), Dr. Dennis Doyle (Committee Member), Dr. Nael McCarty (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Nanotechnology; Chemiluminescence; Biochemistry; Peptide; Aptamer; HIV; Drug delivery; Cancer; Magnetic nanoparticles; Nanobiotechnology; Magnetic materials; Ferrites (Magnetic materials); Chemiluminescence Diagnostic use; Nanomedicine; Nanoparticles; Drug delivery systems; Cobalt; Spinel group

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Scarberry, K. E. (2009). Biomedical applications of cobalt-spinel ferrite nanoparticles for cancer cell extraction and drug delivery. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33951

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Scarberry, Kenneth Edward. “Biomedical applications of cobalt-spinel ferrite nanoparticles for cancer cell extraction and drug delivery.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33951.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Scarberry, Kenneth Edward. “Biomedical applications of cobalt-spinel ferrite nanoparticles for cancer cell extraction and drug delivery.” 2009. Web. 15 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Scarberry KE. Biomedical applications of cobalt-spinel ferrite nanoparticles for cancer cell extraction and drug delivery. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. [cited 2021 Jan 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33951.

Council of Science Editors:

Scarberry KE. Biomedical applications of cobalt-spinel ferrite nanoparticles for cancer cell extraction and drug delivery. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33951

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