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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Dr. J. Carson Meredith"). Showing records 1 – 6 of 6 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Wingkono, Gracy A. Design and characterization of materials with microphase-separated surface patterns for screening osteoblast response to adhesion.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2009, Georgia Tech

 A study on application of combinatorial methods (CM) and high-throughput methods (HTM) to biomaterials design, characterization, and screening are reported in this thesis - focusing… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Blend; Polymer; Combinatorial chemistry; High-throughput; Screening; Biocompatible; Biodegradable; Biomaterial; Surface pattern; Biomedical materials; Materials Research; Tissue engineering; Biocompatibility

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wingkono, G. A. (2009). Design and characterization of materials with microphase-separated surface patterns for screening osteoblast response to adhesion. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31735

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wingkono, Gracy A. “Design and characterization of materials with microphase-separated surface patterns for screening osteoblast response to adhesion.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 24, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31735.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wingkono, Gracy A. “Design and characterization of materials with microphase-separated surface patterns for screening osteoblast response to adhesion.” 2009. Web. 24 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Wingkono GA. Design and characterization of materials with microphase-separated surface patterns for screening osteoblast response to adhesion. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. [cited 2021 Jan 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31735.

Council of Science Editors:

Wingkono GA. Design and characterization of materials with microphase-separated surface patterns for screening osteoblast response to adhesion. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31735


Georgia Tech

2. Ozkan, Ibrahim Ali. Thermodynamic model for associating polymer solutions.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2004, Georgia Tech

 Polymer solutions in which there are strong specific interactions between the polymer and the solvent are of interest in a number of biological applications. Of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Modeling; Association; Polymer solutions; Thermodynamics; Thermochemistry; Polymer solutions; Chemical models

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APA (6th Edition):

Ozkan, I. A. (2004). Thermodynamic model for associating polymer solutions. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5115

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ozkan, Ibrahim Ali. “Thermodynamic model for associating polymer solutions.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 24, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5115.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ozkan, Ibrahim Ali. “Thermodynamic model for associating polymer solutions.” 2004. Web. 24 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Ozkan IA. Thermodynamic model for associating polymer solutions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. [cited 2021 Jan 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5115.

Council of Science Editors:

Ozkan IA. Thermodynamic model for associating polymer solutions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5115


Georgia Tech

3. Marla, Krishna Tej. Molecular Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Colloid-Polymer Mixtures: Chemical Potentials and Interaction Forces.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2004, Georgia Tech

 Nanoscale colloidal particles display fascinating electronic, optical and reinforcement properties as a consequence of their dimensions. Stable dispersions of nanoscale colloids find applications in drug… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Nanoparticle interaction forces; Colloid chemical potential; Nanoparticle-polymer systems; Colloid-polymer mixtures

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APA (6th Edition):

Marla, K. T. (2004). Molecular Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Colloid-Polymer Mixtures: Chemical Potentials and Interaction Forces. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7604

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Marla, Krishna Tej. “Molecular Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Colloid-Polymer Mixtures: Chemical Potentials and Interaction Forces.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 24, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7604.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Marla, Krishna Tej. “Molecular Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Colloid-Polymer Mixtures: Chemical Potentials and Interaction Forces.” 2004. Web. 24 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Marla KT. Molecular Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Colloid-Polymer Mixtures: Chemical Potentials and Interaction Forces. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. [cited 2021 Jan 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7604.

Council of Science Editors:

Marla KT. Molecular Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Colloid-Polymer Mixtures: Chemical Potentials and Interaction Forces. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7604


Georgia Tech

4. Myneni, Satyanarayana. Post Plasma Etch Residue Removal Using Carbon Dioxide Based Fluids.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2004, Georgia Tech

 As feature sizes in semiconductor devices become smaller and newer materials are incorporated, current methods for photoresist and post plasma etch residue removal face several… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Low-K; Angle resolved XPS; Surface cleaning; Supercritical carbon dioxide; ATR-FTIR; Fluorocarbon residue; Etch residue; Semiconductors Cleaning; Plasma etching; Liquid carbon dioxide Industrial applications

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APA (6th Edition):

Myneni, S. (2004). Post Plasma Etch Residue Removal Using Carbon Dioxide Based Fluids. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7605

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Myneni, Satyanarayana. “Post Plasma Etch Residue Removal Using Carbon Dioxide Based Fluids.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 24, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7605.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Myneni, Satyanarayana. “Post Plasma Etch Residue Removal Using Carbon Dioxide Based Fluids.” 2004. Web. 24 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Myneni S. Post Plasma Etch Residue Removal Using Carbon Dioxide Based Fluids. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. [cited 2021 Jan 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7605.

Council of Science Editors:

Myneni S. Post Plasma Etch Residue Removal Using Carbon Dioxide Based Fluids. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7605


Georgia Tech

5. Sormana, Joe-Lahai. Combinatorial Synthesis and High-Throughput Characterization of Polyurethaneureas and Their Nanocomposites with Laponite.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2005, Georgia Tech

 Segmented polyurethaneureas (SPUU) are thermoplastic elastomers with excellent elastic properties, high abrasion resistance and tear strength, making them very useful in numerous industrial applications ranging… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Combinatorial; High throughput; Polyurethaneurea; Mechanical properties; Combinatorial analysis; Elastomers; Elastoplasticity; Materials science; Polyurethanes; Nanocomposites

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APA (6th Edition):

Sormana, J. (2005). Combinatorial Synthesis and High-Throughput Characterization of Polyurethaneureas and Their Nanocomposites with Laponite. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11640

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sormana, Joe-Lahai. “Combinatorial Synthesis and High-Throughput Characterization of Polyurethaneureas and Their Nanocomposites with Laponite.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 24, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11640.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sormana, Joe-Lahai. “Combinatorial Synthesis and High-Throughput Characterization of Polyurethaneureas and Their Nanocomposites with Laponite.” 2005. Web. 24 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Sormana J. Combinatorial Synthesis and High-Throughput Characterization of Polyurethaneureas and Their Nanocomposites with Laponite. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2021 Jan 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11640.

Council of Science Editors:

Sormana J. Combinatorial Synthesis and High-Throughput Characterization of Polyurethaneureas and Their Nanocomposites with Laponite. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11640


Georgia Tech

6. Pathak, Shantanu Chaturvedi. Characterization of plasma-polymerized polyethylene glycol-like films.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2008, Georgia Tech

 A parallel-plate capacitively-coupled plasma deposition system was designed and built for the growth of polyethylene glycol-like films. Deposition rate, bonding structure and dissolution and swelling… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Barrier film; Plasma polymerization; Stent; Biomedical materials Research; Medical instruments and apparatus; Thin films

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APA (6th Edition):

Pathak, S. C. (2008). Characterization of plasma-polymerized polyethylene glycol-like films. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31789

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pathak, Shantanu Chaturvedi. “Characterization of plasma-polymerized polyethylene glycol-like films.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 24, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31789.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pathak, Shantanu Chaturvedi. “Characterization of plasma-polymerized polyethylene glycol-like films.” 2008. Web. 24 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Pathak SC. Characterization of plasma-polymerized polyethylene glycol-like films. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. [cited 2021 Jan 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31789.

Council of Science Editors:

Pathak SC. Characterization of plasma-polymerized polyethylene glycol-like films. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31789

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