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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Dr. Hanjoong Jo"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. McLane, Jesica Mata. Investigation of 1alpha,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 membrane receptor ERp60 in adipocytes from male and female lean and obese mice.

Degree: MS, Biomedical Engineering, 2009, Georgia Tech

The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not adipocytes harvested directly from fat pads or induced from bone marrow in lean and obese mice exhibit a sex-dependent rapid response to vitamin D metabolite 1á,25(OH)2D3 and if so to elucidate if it is via an ERp60 receptor mediated signaling pathway. The role of 1á,25(OH)2D3 and specifically the membrane effect will be examined in two genetically distinct mice to see if their cells have a differing sensitivity. The results indicate that there are differing responses in adipocytes that are induced from bone marrow versus differentiated fat pad adipocytes, and the function of 1á,25(OH)2D3 is sex-specific in some cases. Additionally, all the adipocytes tested demonstrated a rapid response to 1á,25(OH)2D3; mRNA for nVDR and ERp60 were found in all cells however the only functional protein found in the plasma membrane was ERp60 indicating that it may be necessary for the rapid response whereas nVDR is not required. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Barbara Boyan (Committee Chair), Dr. Zvi Schwartz (Committee Co-Chair), Dr. Hanjoong Jo (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Vitamin D; Pdia3; Vitmain D receptor; ERp60; Adipocytes; PKC; Adipogenesis; Fat cells; Adipose tissues; Cell receptors

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APA (6th Edition):

McLane, J. M. (2009). Investigation of 1alpha,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 membrane receptor ERp60 in adipocytes from male and female lean and obese mice. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31793

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McLane, Jesica Mata. “Investigation of 1alpha,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 membrane receptor ERp60 in adipocytes from male and female lean and obese mice.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 27, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31793.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McLane, Jesica Mata. “Investigation of 1alpha,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 membrane receptor ERp60 in adipocytes from male and female lean and obese mice.” 2009. Web. 27 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

McLane JM. Investigation of 1alpha,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 membrane receptor ERp60 in adipocytes from male and female lean and obese mice. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2009. [cited 2021 Jan 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31793.

Council of Science Editors:

McLane JM. Investigation of 1alpha,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 membrane receptor ERp60 in adipocytes from male and female lean and obese mice. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31793


Georgia Tech

2. Stott, Shannon Leigh. Kinetic Study of Intracellular Ice Formation in Micropatterned Endothelial Cell Cultures Using High Speed Video Cryomicroscopy.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2006, Georgia Tech

Intracellular ice formation (IIF), a major cause of cryoinjury in biological cells, is significantly more pronounced during freezing of tissue than during freezing of suspended cells. While extensive studies of IIF have been conducted for single cells in suspension, few have investigated IIF in tissue. Due to the increased complexity that arises from both cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions in tissue, knowledge of cryobiology of isolated cells cannot simply be extrapolated to tissue. Different theories have been hypothesized for the mechanisms of IIF in tissue, but none have been conclusively proven. Towards the goal of developing mathematical models to accurately predict the probability of IIF in tissues of one or more cell types, we have developed a novel high-speed video cryomicroscopy system capable of image acquisition at sampling rates up to 32,000 Hz. Specifically, the effects of cell adhesion to the substrate and cell-cell interactions were investigated with experimental (micropatterned endothelial cell constructs) and mathematical models (Monte Carlo simulations). We have reported the first direct observations of the IIF process recorded at unprecedented sub-millisecond and sub-micron resolution. For the majority of our experiments, IIF nucleation was determined to occur preferentially at the cell perimeter. This observation was not consistent with the commonly accepted hypotheses of ice nucleation in suspended cells and suggests that an alternative mechanism of IIF initiation is dominant in adherent cells. In addition, the kinetics of ice nucleation were shown to be influenced by time in culture, attached cell perimeter, fibronectin coating density, and degree of cell-cell contact. Moreover, an additional phenomenon, paracellular ice penetration was identified, and the frequency of formation was correlated with focal adhesion formation. The data and mathematical models presented in this thesis bring closer the goal of elucidating the primary mechanisms contributing to IIF in tissue; providing important contributions to both the fields of cryopreservation (minimizing IIF) and cryosurgery (maximizing IIF). Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Jens O. M. Karlsson (Committee Chair), Dr. Andrés García (Committee Member), Dr. Athanassios Sambanis (Committee Member), Dr. Cheng Zhu (Committee Member), Dr. Hanjoong Jo (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Cryopreservation; IIF; Modeling; Cryosurgery; Cryomicroscopy; Tissues Cryopreservation Mathematical models; Cryobiology

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APA (6th Edition):

Stott, S. L. (2006). Kinetic Study of Intracellular Ice Formation in Micropatterned Endothelial Cell Cultures Using High Speed Video Cryomicroscopy. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16256

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stott, Shannon Leigh. “Kinetic Study of Intracellular Ice Formation in Micropatterned Endothelial Cell Cultures Using High Speed Video Cryomicroscopy.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 27, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16256.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stott, Shannon Leigh. “Kinetic Study of Intracellular Ice Formation in Micropatterned Endothelial Cell Cultures Using High Speed Video Cryomicroscopy.” 2006. Web. 27 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Stott SL. Kinetic Study of Intracellular Ice Formation in Micropatterned Endothelial Cell Cultures Using High Speed Video Cryomicroscopy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. [cited 2021 Jan 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16256.

Council of Science Editors:

Stott SL. Kinetic Study of Intracellular Ice Formation in Micropatterned Endothelial Cell Cultures Using High Speed Video Cryomicroscopy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16256


Georgia Tech

3. Rose, Stacey Loren. In Vitro Model of Vascular Healing in the Presence of Biomaterials.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2006, Georgia Tech

Coronary artery stent placement has been a significant advance in the percutaneous treatment of atherosclerotic disease, and tissue engineered vascular grafts may provide a viable alternative to autologous segments for small diameter vessels. However, in-stent restenosis remains an important limitation, and tissue engineered grafts have poor patency and high risk of thrombus formation due to their inability to maintain a confluent, adherent, and quiescent endothelium. While animal models provide insight into the pathophysiology of these situations, elucidation of the relative importance of stent or graft components, hemodynamic factors, and molecular factors is difficult. Very little research has focused on bridging gaps in knowledge concerning blood/biomaterial interactions, blood/endothelial cell interactions, and endothelial cell/smooth muscle cell cross-talk. The work presented within this thesis will do just that. The objective of this thesis research was to elucidate the influence of biomaterial-induced activation of leukocytes on endothelial cell or smooth muscle cell phenotype, as well as endothelial cell/smooth muscle cell cross-talk in co-culture systems. Towards this goal, two complimentary in vitro endothelial cell/smooth muscle cell co-culture models with divergent smooth muscle cell phenotype were developed and characterized. Using these systems, it was found that the presence of more secretory smooth muscle cells (as would be seen in wound healing or disease) in general enhanced endothelial cell activation in response to biomaterial-pretreated monocytes, while the presence of less secretory smooth muscle cells (to model more quiescent smooth muscle cells found in uninjured healthy vessels) suppressed endothelial cell activation in response to biomaterial-pretreated monocytes (and neutrophils to a small degree). Additionally, biomaterial-pretreated monocytes and neutrophils amplified a smooth muscle cell phenotypic shift away from a more quiescent state. It is likely that the compounding effect of secretory smooth muscle cells and biomaterial-activated leukocytes are responsible for altered vascular wound healing upon implantation of stents or vascular grafts. Understanding the specific signals causing these effects, or signals delivered by contractile smooth muscle cells that limit these effects help to provide design criteria for development of devices or grafts capable of long term patency. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Julia Babensee (Committee Chair), Dr. Elliot Chaikof (Committee Member), Dr. Hanjoong Jo (Committee Member), Dr. Michael Sefton (Committee Member), Dr. Robert Nerem (Committee Member), Dr. Suzanne Eskin (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Biomaterials; Leukocytes; Smooth muscle cells; Endothelial cells; Stents (Surgery); Vascular endothelial growth factors; Biocompatibility; Leucocytes; Regeneration (Biology)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rose, S. L. (2006). In Vitro Model of Vascular Healing in the Presence of Biomaterials. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/13955

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rose, Stacey Loren. “In Vitro Model of Vascular Healing in the Presence of Biomaterials.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 27, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/13955.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rose, Stacey Loren. “In Vitro Model of Vascular Healing in the Presence of Biomaterials.” 2006. Web. 27 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Rose SL. In Vitro Model of Vascular Healing in the Presence of Biomaterials. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. [cited 2021 Jan 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/13955.

Council of Science Editors:

Rose SL. In Vitro Model of Vascular Healing in the Presence of Biomaterials. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/13955

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