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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Dr. Gee-Kung Chang"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Williams, Saunya Michelle. Effects of image compression on data interpretation for telepathology.

Degree: PhD, Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2011, Georgia Tech

When geographical distance poses as a barrier, telepathology is designed to offer pathologists the opportunity to replicate their normal activities by using an alternative means of practice. The rapid progression in technology has greatly influenced the appeal of telepathology and its use in multiple domains. To that point, telepathology systems help to afford teleconsultation services for remote locations, improve the workload distribution in clinical environments, measure quality assurance, and also enhance educational programs. While telepathology is an attractive method to many potential users, the resource requirements for digitizing microscopic specimens have hindered widespread adoption. The use of image compression is extremely critical to help advance the pervasiveness of digital images in pathology. For this research, we characterize two different methods that we use to assess compression of pathology images. Our first method is characterized by the fact that image quality is human-based and completely subjective in terms of interpretation. Our second method is characterized by the fact that image analysis is introduced by using machine-based interpretation to provide objective results. Additionally, the objective outcomes from the image analysis may also be used to help confirm tumor classification. With these two methods in mind, the purpose of this dissertation is to quantify the effects of image compression on data interpretation as seen by human experts and a computerized algorithm for use in telepathology. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Nikil S. Jayant (Committee Chair), Dr. Arthur Koblasz (Committee Member), Dr. Gee-Kung Chang (Committee Member), Dr. Gregory D. Abowd (Committee Member), Dr. Mark L. Braunstein (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Image analysis; Image compression; Telepathology; Diagnostic imaging; Digital images; Image compression; Data transmission systems

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APA (6th Edition):

Williams, S. M. (2011). Effects of image compression on data interpretation for telepathology. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42762

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Williams, Saunya Michelle. “Effects of image compression on data interpretation for telepathology.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed May 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42762.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Williams, Saunya Michelle. “Effects of image compression on data interpretation for telepathology.” 2011. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Williams SM. Effects of image compression on data interpretation for telepathology. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42762.

Council of Science Editors:

Williams SM. Effects of image compression on data interpretation for telepathology. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42762


Georgia Tech

2. Chowdhury, Arshad M. Optical Label Switching Technologies for Optical Packet Switched Networks.

Degree: PhD, Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2006, Georgia Tech

Optical packet switching (OPS) is the most prominent candidate transport solution that can seamlessly integrate electrical and optical layers by transferring certain switching functionality from electronics to optics, thus alleviating unnecessarily slow and expensive optical-electrical-optical conversions and signal processing at the switching node. Optical Label Switching (OLS) is an important aspect of the optical packet switched network that enables very low-latency forwarding of ultra-high bit-rate, protocol-independent packets entirely in the optical domain. The objective of the proposed research is to develop novel, efficient techniques to realize several key enabling technologies such as optical label generation and encoding, optical label swapping, all-optical buffering, and spectral efficient transmission system for optical label switched based OPS networks. A novel scheme of generating optical label at the ingress node using optical carrier suppression and separation (OCSS) technique is proposed. This scheme does not suffer from any unavoidable interference, limited extinction ratio or strict synchronization requirements between payload and label as observed by the currently available other label generation methods. One of the primary challenges to realize optical label swapping at the core node of scalable OLS network is the insertion of new optical labels without any wavelength conversion for same wavelength packet routing. A novel mechanism to realize same wavelength packet switching without using any conventional wavelength converter in the OLS network carrying differential phase-shift keying (DPSK) modulated payload and on-off keying (OOK) modulated optical label is demonstrated. Also a new dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) optical buffer architecture using optical fiber delay lines that can provide wavelength selective reconfigurable variable delays is proposed. Optical packet switching provides automated, reconfigurable, and faster provision of both wavelength and bandwidth with finer granularity in the optical layer. However, a newer, cost-effective, and spectrally efficient optical transmission technology is essential to support the explosive bandwidth demand expected by the future optical packet switched networks. To meet this challenge, a spectrally efficient solution for transporting 40 Gbps per channel data over 50 GHz spaced DWDM system is developed by exploiting optical carrier suppression and separation technique and optical duobinary modulation. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Gee-Kung Chang (Committee Chair), Dr. Chunny Ji (Committee Member), Dr. Constantine Dovrolis (Committee Member), Dr. Stephen E Ralph (Committee Member), Dr. Xaoli Ma (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Optical label switching; Optical packet switching; Telecommunication; Optical communications; Spectral efficient transmission; Optical buffer

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chowdhury, A. M. (2006). Optical Label Switching Technologies for Optical Packet Switched Networks. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14047

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chowdhury, Arshad M. “Optical Label Switching Technologies for Optical Packet Switched Networks.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed May 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14047.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chowdhury, Arshad M. “Optical Label Switching Technologies for Optical Packet Switched Networks.” 2006. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Chowdhury AM. Optical Label Switching Technologies for Optical Packet Switched Networks. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14047.

Council of Science Editors:

Chowdhury AM. Optical Label Switching Technologies for Optical Packet Switched Networks. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14047


Georgia Tech

3. Chen, Yu-Bin. Rigorous Modeling of the Radiative Properties of Micro/Nanostructures and Comparisons with Measurements of Fabricated Gratings and Slit Arrays.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2007, Georgia Tech

Radiative properties of a material is the core of thermal science and optics, which play critical roles in modern technologies, including microelectronics, energy conversion, and nanotechnology. The key to modify or enhance radiative properties is employing one-, two-, and three-dimensional (1, 2, and 3D) periodic micro/nanostructures. Since their applications are not fully uncovered and very few comprehensive studies are available, the objective of this dissertation is to explore applications of periodic micro/nanostructures with modified radiative properties in modern technologies through both numerically and experimentally investigations. Theses representative applications include the thermal control in rapid thermal processing, the design of a wavelength-selective radiator for thermophotovoltaic systems, and the nanothermal manufacturing. The theoretical foundation of the study is built on the rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) for numerical calculation of the far-field radiative properties and the electromagnetic field distribution in the near-field regime. Measurements of diffraction efficiencies are conducted on fabricated 1D and 2D periodic silicon microstructures with a laser scatterometer/diffractometer with high angular resolution. The diffraction efficiency can be employed for non-contact surface profile inspection tool because it strongly depends on structure patterns. For better temperature control during rapid thermal processing, the dissertation performs a parametric study on radiation absorption of a generic CMOS device together with its simplified nanoscale structures. The applicability of approximation models, which homogenize micro/nanostructures into a film, is also evaluated. Next, a new concept of complex gratings is proposed for actively tailoring the radiative properties and serving as a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) radiator. The radiator exhibits a wide-band and angle-independent high transverse magnetic wave emittance matching the bandgap of TPV cells so that the energy conversion efficiency can be improved. Furthermore, the nanoscale metallic slit arrays show polarization-dependant enhanced transmission and highly localized electromagnetic energy density, which hold promising potentials in nanothermal manufacturing. Three submicrometer metallic slit arrays are fabricated on top of a silicon substrate. Their spectral transmittance is measured with a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer and largely agrees with RCWA modeling results. In short, the dissertation clearly demonstrates that precise control and tuning of radiative properties using micro/nanofabrication are not only feasible but also may have numerous technological impacts. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Zhuomin Zhang (Committee Chair), Dr. F. Levent Degertekin (Committee Member), Dr. Gee-Kung Chang (Committee Member), Dr. Pei-feng Hsu (Committee Member), Dr. Peter J. Hesketh (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Micro/Nanostructures; Gratings

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chen, Y. (2007). Rigorous Modeling of the Radiative Properties of Micro/Nanostructures and Comparisons with Measurements of Fabricated Gratings and Slit Arrays. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14470

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chen, Yu-Bin. “Rigorous Modeling of the Radiative Properties of Micro/Nanostructures and Comparisons with Measurements of Fabricated Gratings and Slit Arrays.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed May 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14470.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chen, Yu-Bin. “Rigorous Modeling of the Radiative Properties of Micro/Nanostructures and Comparisons with Measurements of Fabricated Gratings and Slit Arrays.” 2007. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Chen Y. Rigorous Modeling of the Radiative Properties of Micro/Nanostructures and Comparisons with Measurements of Fabricated Gratings and Slit Arrays. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14470.

Council of Science Editors:

Chen Y. Rigorous Modeling of the Radiative Properties of Micro/Nanostructures and Comparisons with Measurements of Fabricated Gratings and Slit Arrays. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14470

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