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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Dr. Dirk Schaefer"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Hyder, Andrew Charles. Design and implementation of remotely controlled laboratory experiments.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2010, Georgia Tech

Laboratory experimentation plays a critical role in the education of engineers. With the increase of students choosing to obtain their education online through Distance Learning programs, something must be done to allow them to gain practice with experimental techniques. Remote Laboratories (RLs), or laboratory experiments specially constructed for remote use, have the potential to fill this void. In a "traditional" laboratory experiment, students physically interact with an apparatus to obtain experimental data. Remote Laboratories are meant to offer a similar learning experience that is equivalent to, or as close as possible to the physical one, by allowing a user to control the apparatus from a remote location using mechatronic control hardware, integrated with data acquisition software. Studies have shown there is no significant difference with regard to meeting educational outcomes between students who performed an experiment remotely versus those who carried out the same experiment in-person. The focus of this thesis is on the development of a framework for developing and implementing Remote Laboratories. To do this, this research introduces advances in the following areas: a) Identifying the educational differences between traditional and Remote Laboratories. b) Developing a method for comparing student perceptions about RLs and their laboratory reports through surveys and laboratory report grading. c) Creating a standard Information Technology protocol for hosting and conducting remote experiments. d) Investigating alternative uses for RLs. e) Proposing new methods to best mimic the physical interactions of traditional laboratories. f) Creation of functioning Remote Laboratories. g) Analyzing the findings of their use in a classroom setting. A comparison of surveys and laboratory reports between groups that conducted remote experiments and those which conducted traditional experiments over a period of 4 semesters suggest that RLs have the potential to be used to achieve the same educational outcomes as traditional laboratories. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Dirk Schaefer (Committee Chair), Dr. Nelson Baker (Committee Member), Dr. Seung-Kyum Choi (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Distance Education; Distance Learning; Teleoperated Laboratory; Remote Labs; Remote Laboratory; Laboratories Experiments; Remote control; Distance education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hyder, A. C. (2010). Design and implementation of remotely controlled laboratory experiments. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33904

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hyder, Andrew Charles. “Design and implementation of remotely controlled laboratory experiments.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed September 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33904.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hyder, Andrew Charles. “Design and implementation of remotely controlled laboratory experiments.” 2010. Web. 15 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Hyder AC. Design and implementation of remotely controlled laboratory experiments. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2010. [cited 2019 Sep 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33904.

Council of Science Editors:

Hyder AC. Design and implementation of remotely controlled laboratory experiments. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33904

2. Tejada, Francisco Javier. Quantifying the life cycle water consumption of a passenger vehicle.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2012, Georgia Tech

Various studies have pointed out the growing need to assess the availability of water sources in regions around the world as future forecasts suggest that water demands will increase significantly for agricultural, industrial and human consumption while freshwater resources are being depleted. One such emerging issue is the effect of industrial operations on said resources, specifically from automobiles. With numerous localities experiencing stresses on water availability, key stakeholders - suppliers, automakers, and vehicle end-users - need to better realize the effect vehicle manufacturing, usage, and disposal have on water resources. While efforts to improve the overall environmental performance of vehicles have mainly concentrated on improving technologies, there has also been considerable effort devoted to characterizing the life-cycle performance of the vehicle product system. However, much of this work has focused on energy consumption and carbon emissions while few studies have examined water. The difference between water use versus water consumption were highlighted and the life-cycle water consumption of a gasoline-powered midsize vehicle were analyzed from material extraction through production, use, and final disposition/end of life. This analysis examines each of the phases to determine a carĂ¢ s water footprint using data from the EcoInvent Life Cycle Analysis database as well as data collected from literature sources. Although water use is typically metered at the factory level, water consumption (i.e., water lost through evaporation and/or incorporation into a material, part, and/or product) is much harder to quantify. As shown in this thesis, the difference can be an order of magnitude or more because much of the water that goes into the different processes is either reused, recycled, or discharged back to its original source. The use phase of a vehicle has the biggest impact on the overall vehicle water consumption, followed by material production, whereas water consumption for the end of life processing seems to be relatively insignificant. It is also shown that the impact of energy consumption as part of the total water footprint is very large when compared to the other processes given the dependence on water for energy production. The assessment in this thesis represents a life-cycle inventory and serves as an initial benchmark as no previous study has been completed to determine the water consumption for the life of a vehicle, let alone for most other products. The impact of water consumption varies by region and locality, and a differentiation of impact would still be needed to determine whether the water consumption actually happens in water scarce regions or not. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Bert Bras (Committee Chair), Dr. Dirk Schaefer (Committee Member), Dr. Harry Cook (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Water; Vehicle; Life cycle; Inventory; Water consumption; Water use; Water consumption; Automobiles; Life cycle costing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tejada, F. J. (2012). Quantifying the life cycle water consumption of a passenger vehicle. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/43637

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tejada, Francisco Javier. “Quantifying the life cycle water consumption of a passenger vehicle.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed September 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/43637.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tejada, Francisco Javier. “Quantifying the life cycle water consumption of a passenger vehicle.” 2012. Web. 15 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Tejada FJ. Quantifying the life cycle water consumption of a passenger vehicle. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2012. [cited 2019 Sep 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/43637.

Council of Science Editors:

Tejada FJ. Quantifying the life cycle water consumption of a passenger vehicle. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/43637

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