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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Dr. David N. Ku"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Akin, Ryan E. Minimally invasive assessment of lymphatic pumping pressure using near infrared imaging.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2013, Georgia Tech

Although the major functions of the lymphatic system are fairly well defined, its vasculature has yet to be well characterized in comparison to its blood vasculature counterpart. Recent advances in optical imaging techniques have allowed for more detailed and quantitative evaluations of lymph flow dynamics and mechanism. A rat tail is often used for investigations of lymph flow because of the simple geometry, superficial nature, and disease progression models of its collecting lymphatic vessels. In this study, a pressure cuff system was fabricated and coupled with an existing functional near infrared (NIR) imaging system to measure the overall pumping pressure of the lymphatic vessels of a rat tail. In addition to adapting the system for use on rodents, previous systems used for measuring lymphatic pumping pressure in humans were improved upon in several ways. The system defined here utilizes closed-loop feedback control of pressure application at smaller, more precise intervals. Using this device, a significant difference in lymphatic vessel pumping pressure was detected between a control case and a treatment case in which a vasoactive substance with a nitric oxide donor (GTNO ointment) was applied to the tail. Although it is known that nitric oxide plays a crucial physiologic role in propagation of flow through lymphatic vessels, this study has quantified its significant pharmacological reduction of pumping pressure for the first time. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. J. Brandon Dixon (Committee Chair), Dr. David N. Ku (Committee Member), Dr. Rudolph L. Gleason (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Near infrared; Biomedical imaging; Lymphatics; Lymphatic system; LabView; Rat tail model; NIR; Pumping pressure; Diagnostic imaging; Lymphatics; Lymph Circulation; Intrinsic optical imaging

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Akin, R. E. (2013). Minimally invasive assessment of lymphatic pumping pressure using near infrared imaging. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47536

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Akin, Ryan E. “Minimally invasive assessment of lymphatic pumping pressure using near infrared imaging.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed March 07, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47536.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Akin, Ryan E. “Minimally invasive assessment of lymphatic pumping pressure using near infrared imaging.” 2013. Web. 07 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Akin RE. Minimally invasive assessment of lymphatic pumping pressure using near infrared imaging. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2013. [cited 2021 Mar 07]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47536.

Council of Science Editors:

Akin RE. Minimally invasive assessment of lymphatic pumping pressure using near infrared imaging. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47536


Georgia Tech

2. Sathe, Rahul D. Design and Development of a Novel Implantable Prosthetic Vein Valve.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2006, Georgia Tech

Over seven million Americans suffer from Chronic Venous Insufficiency (CVI), a painful and debilitating disease that affects the superficial and deep veins of the legs. Problems associated with CVI include varicose veins, bleeding, ulcerations, severe swelling, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism, which may lead to death. The presence of CVI results from damaged (incompetent) one-way vein valves in leg veins. These valves normally allow forward flow of blood to the heart, and prevent blood from pooling at the feet. However, incompetent valves allow reflux of blood, causing clinical problems. There are few effective clinical therapies for treating CVI. Vein valve transplantation is a surgical option for treatment. However, it is often difficult to find suitable donor valves. Very few prosthetic valves developed in the past have demonstrated sufficient clinical or mechanical functionality. Persistent problems include thrombus formation, leaking valves, and valves that do not open at physiologic pressure gradient. The primary objective of this research was to develop a clinically relevant functional prosthetic vein valve. The novel prosthetic valve is flexible, biocompatible, has low thrombogenecity, and is easy to manufacture. It was designed to address well-defined consumer needs and functional design requirements. The valve was required to 1) withstand 300 mmHg of backpressure with leakage less than 1.0 mL/min, 2) open with a pressure gradient less than 5 mmHg, and 3) meet criteria 1 and 2 after 500,000 cycles of operation. The valve met these design requirements in bench testing. The valve can open with a pressure gradient of 2.6 0.7 mmHg, and can withstand 300 mmHg with leakage less than 0.5 mL/min. The valve remained functional after opening and closing over 500,000 times. The valve presented in this research is operationally functional, and is a potential solution for treating venous incompetence in CVI patients. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. David N. Ku (Committee Chair), Dr. David Rosen (Committee Member), Dr. Elliot Chaikof (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Vein valve; Deep vein thrombosis; Venous valve; Prosthetic vein valve; Chronic venous insufficiency; Implants, Artificial Design and construction; Venous valves Transplantation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sathe, R. D. (2006). Design and Development of a Novel Implantable Prosthetic Vein Valve. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14495

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sathe, Rahul D. “Design and Development of a Novel Implantable Prosthetic Vein Valve.” 2006. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed March 07, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14495.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sathe, Rahul D. “Design and Development of a Novel Implantable Prosthetic Vein Valve.” 2006. Web. 07 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Sathe RD. Design and Development of a Novel Implantable Prosthetic Vein Valve. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2006. [cited 2021 Mar 07]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14495.

Council of Science Editors:

Sathe RD. Design and Development of a Novel Implantable Prosthetic Vein Valve. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14495


Georgia Tech

3. Flannery, Conor James. Thrombus Formation under High Shear in Arterial Stenotic Flow.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2005, Georgia Tech

Acute thrombotic and thromboembolic occlusion of atherosclerotic vessels are events that precipitate most heart attacks and strokes. In arterial stenotic flow, thrombus formation is shear dependent and may or may not lead to complete occlusion of the vessel. Platelets in whole blood adhere to collagen-coated surfaces and as they accumulate the resistance of the stenosis increases because of the decreasing passageway of the occluded stenosis. As a model of blood clotting in stenoses, porcine blood is heparinized and perfused over tubular glass test sections that are coated with collagen type I. Each test section has a preexisting stenosis and its severity varies so that higher percent stenoses produce higher shear rates on the blood. The hypothesis of this thesis is that high shear rates due to stenosis in arteries are a necessary feature for occlusive thrombosis. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. David N. Ku (Committee Chair), Dr. Andres J. Garcia (Committee Member), Dr. Larry V. McIntire (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Stenosis; Shear; Blood; Thrombosis

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Flannery, C. J. (2005). Thrombus Formation under High Shear in Arterial Stenotic Flow. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6943

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Flannery, Conor James. “Thrombus Formation under High Shear in Arterial Stenotic Flow.” 2005. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed March 07, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6943.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Flannery, Conor James. “Thrombus Formation under High Shear in Arterial Stenotic Flow.” 2005. Web. 07 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Flannery CJ. Thrombus Formation under High Shear in Arterial Stenotic Flow. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2021 Mar 07]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6943.

Council of Science Editors:

Flannery CJ. Thrombus Formation under High Shear in Arterial Stenotic Flow. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6943

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