Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

Language: English

You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Dr. Christopher W. Jones"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Georgia Tech

1. Nayak, Satish Prakash. Design, Synthesis and Characterization of Multiresponsive Microgels.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2005, Georgia Tech

This thesis is geared towards using hydrogel nanoparticles in various biotechnological applications. The polymer that was used in making these nanoparticles was poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), which is a thermoresponsive polymer. These particles were used in making fast responsive polymer films, which can be used in optics. It was observed that the rate of deswelling increased as the concentration of the nanoparticles in the film was increased. These particles were also used in making photoresponsive materials. In this case a photoresponsive dye (malachite green) was conjugated to these nanoparticles and in presence of light of appropriate wavelength the particles undergo a phase transition. A core/shell construct was synthesized where the core was composed of degradable cross-links and the shell of composed of non-degradable cross-links. The degradable cross-linker had vicinal diols, which can be cleaved by sodium periodate. Hence after degrading the core, hollow particles were obtained. Zwitterionic particles were made by incorporating a cationic and anionic comonomer. These microgels go from a positively charged state to zwitterionic to negatively charged state on increasing the pH. One of the important potential applications for these microgels is drug delivery. Microgels were used for targeting cancer cells. Folic acid was used as the targeting ligand. The microgels were conjugated with folic acid and were able to target cells that overexpress folate receptors. In one other application core/shell microgels were made which exhibit pore-size dependent permeation of proteins. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. L. Andrew Lyon (Committee Chair), Dr. Christopher W. Jones (Committee Member), Dr. Jiri Janata (Committee Member), Dr. Marcus Weck (Committee Member), Dr. Nicholas V. Hud (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: pNIPAm; Core/Shell; Nanoparticles; Hydrogels; Polymers; Thin films; Polymers Thermal properties; Polymers Optical properties; Nanoparticles Synthesis; Colloids

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nayak, S. P. (2005). Design, Synthesis and Characterization of Multiresponsive Microgels. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6845

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nayak, Satish Prakash. “Design, Synthesis and Characterization of Multiresponsive Microgels.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed April 14, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6845.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nayak, Satish Prakash. “Design, Synthesis and Characterization of Multiresponsive Microgels.” 2005. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Nayak SP. Design, Synthesis and Characterization of Multiresponsive Microgels. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6845.

Council of Science Editors:

Nayak SP. Design, Synthesis and Characterization of Multiresponsive Microgels. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6845


Georgia Tech

2. Valenzuela, Mariefel Bayta. Batch Aqueous-phase Reforming of Lignocellulosic Biomass for Hydrogen Production.

Degree: MS, Chemical Engineering, 2006, Georgia Tech

Aqueous-phase reforming (APR) is reported for the first time for the production of H2 from actual biomass. The experiments are carried out in batch using a 100mL Parr microreactor heated to 225C. In this one-pot, two-step process, acid hydrolysis is used to break down the polymeric constituents of biomass to smaller soluble molecules and these species are reformed using a Pt/Al2O3 catalyst. The experiments show that increasing the acid concentration from 1% to 5% causes more than a twelve-fold increase in H2 concentration, with hydrogen a minor product accounting for 18% of the non-condensable gas phase and CO2 as the major product. In the presence of the Pt/Al2O3 reforming catalyst, both the selectivity and yield of hydrogen in the gas phase increase. This is accompanied by a noticeable decrease in carbon monoxide production. Comparison with other feeds such as glucose, wastepaper and ethylene glycol showed that the amount of hydrogen produced from biomass is of a comparable magnitude per gram of feed, although biomass yields more hydrogen per gram of carbohydrate than either glucose or wastepaper. Baseline experiments with only the catalysts in the absence of any biomass show no increase in the reactor system pressure when only water and helium are present, indicating that the observed hydrogen produced is sourced form the biomass. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Christopher W. Jones (Committee Co-Chair), Dr. Pradeep K. Agrawal (Committee Co-Chair), Dr. Howard "Jeff" Empie (Committee Member), Dr. Sujit Banerjee (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: XPS; Hydrogen chemisorption; Waste paper; Bioenergy; Pt/Al2O3; Glucose; H2SO4; Water-gas shift; Hydrogen as fuel; Biomass energy; Chemisorption

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Valenzuela, M. B. (2006). Batch Aqueous-phase Reforming of Lignocellulosic Biomass for Hydrogen Production. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11624

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Valenzuela, Mariefel Bayta. “Batch Aqueous-phase Reforming of Lignocellulosic Biomass for Hydrogen Production.” 2006. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed April 14, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11624.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Valenzuela, Mariefel Bayta. “Batch Aqueous-phase Reforming of Lignocellulosic Biomass for Hydrogen Production.” 2006. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Valenzuela MB. Batch Aqueous-phase Reforming of Lignocellulosic Biomass for Hydrogen Production. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2006. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11624.

Council of Science Editors:

Valenzuela MB. Batch Aqueous-phase Reforming of Lignocellulosic Biomass for Hydrogen Production. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11624


Georgia Tech

3. Hillock, Alexis Maureen Wrenn. Crosslinkable Polyimide Mixed Matrix Membranes for Natural Gas Purification.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2005, Georgia Tech

Crosslinkable mixed matrix membranes represent an attractive technology that promises both outstanding separation properties and swelling resistance for the purification of natural gas. This approach relies upon dispersal of a CO2/CH4 size-discriminating zeolite in a crosslinkable polymer, which is resistant to CO2 swelling when crosslinked. The resulting membrane has the potential to separate CO2 from CH4 more effectively than traditional pure polymer membranes, while also providing needed membrane stability in the presence of aggressive CO2-contaminated natural gas streams. Control studies are conducted using the pure crosslinkable polymer to observe the separation properties and swelling resistance. Initial crosslinkable mixed matrix membrane experiments are then performed and result in an increase in membrane productivity, instead of the expected increase in selectivity. Traditionally, this is caused by material incompatibility at the polymer/zeolite interface, so the crosslinkable mixed matrix membranes are characterized to examine this issue. During the material characterization, a new non-ideal transport phenomenon is discovered in the zeolite phase. A model is developed to better understand the transport and predict subsequent experimental results. Once the independent materials are proven to be viable, crosslinkable mixed matrix membranes that show enhancements in both efficiency and productivity and exhibit stability in the presence of aggressive CO2 feeds are created. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. William J. Koros (Committee Chair), Dr. Christopher W. Jones (Committee Member), Dr. Haskell W. Beckham (Committee Member), Dr. Ronald W. Rousseau (Committee Member), Dr. Stephen J. Miller (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Crosslinked polyimide; Gas separation; Natural gas purification; Zeolite mesoporosity; Mixed matrix

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hillock, A. M. W. (2005). Crosslinkable Polyimide Mixed Matrix Membranes for Natural Gas Purification. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/13933

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hillock, Alexis Maureen Wrenn. “Crosslinkable Polyimide Mixed Matrix Membranes for Natural Gas Purification.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed April 14, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/13933.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hillock, Alexis Maureen Wrenn. “Crosslinkable Polyimide Mixed Matrix Membranes for Natural Gas Purification.” 2005. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Hillock AMW. Crosslinkable Polyimide Mixed Matrix Membranes for Natural Gas Purification. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/13933.

Council of Science Editors:

Hillock AMW. Crosslinkable Polyimide Mixed Matrix Membranes for Natural Gas Purification. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/13933

.