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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Dr. Carson Meredith"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Esekhile, Omoyemen Edoamen. Mixed matrix membranes for mixture gas separation of butane isomers.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2011, Georgia Tech

The goal of this project was to understand and model the performance of hybrid inorganic-organic membranes under realistic operating conditions for hydrocarbon gas/vapor separation, using butane isomers as the model vapors and a hybrid membrane of 6FDA-DAM-5A as an advanced separation system. To achieve the set goal, three objectives were laid out. The first objective was to determine the factors affecting separation performance in dense neat polymer. One main concern was plasticization. High temperature annealing has been reported as an effect means of suppressing plasticization. A study on the effect of annealing temperature was performed by analyzing data acquired via sorption and permeation measurements. Based on the findings from this study, a suitable annealing temperature was determined. Another factor studied was the effect of operating temperature. In deciding a suitable operating temperature, factors such as its possible effect on plasticization as well as reducing heating/cooling cost in industrial application were considered. Based on the knowledge that industrial applications of this membrane would involve mixture separation, the second objective was to understand and model the complexity of a mixed gas system. This was investigated via permeation measurements using three feed compositions. An interesting transport behavior was observed in the mixed gas system, which to the best of our knowledge, has not been observed in other mixed gas systems involving smaller penetrants. This mixed gas transport behavior presented a challenge in predictability using well-established transport models. Two hypotheses were made to explain the observed transport behavior, which led to the development of a new model termed the HHF model and the introduction of a fitting parameter termed the CAUFFV fit. Both the HHF model and CAUFFV fit showed better agreement with experimental data than the well-established mixed gas transport model. The final objective was to explore the use of mixed matrix membranes as a means of improving the separation performance of this system. A major challenge with the fabrication of good mixed matrix membranes was the adhesion of the zeolite particle with the polymer. This was addressed via sieve surface modification through a Grignard treatment process. Although a Grignard treatment procedure existed, there was a challenge of reproducibility of the treatment. This challenge was addressed by exploring the relationship between the sieves and the solvent used in the treatment, and taking advantage of this relationship in the Grignard treatment process. This study helped identify a suitable solvent, which allowed for successful and reproducible treatment of commercial LTA sieves; however, treatment of lab-made sieves continues to prove challenging. Based on improved understanding of the Grignard treatment reaction mechanism, modifications were made to the existing Grignard treatment procedure, resulting in the introduction of a "simplified" Grignard treatment procedure. The new procedure… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. William Koros (Committee Chair), Dr. Amyn Teja (Committee Member), Dr. Carson Meredith (Committee Member), Dr. Karl Jacob (Committee Member), Dr. Victor Breedveld (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Mixed matrix membranes; Mixed gas permeation; Butane isomers; Gases Separation; Gas separation membranes; Membranes (Technology); Separation (Technology)

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APA (6th Edition):

Esekhile, O. E. (2011). Mixed matrix membranes for mixture gas separation of butane isomers. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42929

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Esekhile, Omoyemen Edoamen. “Mixed matrix membranes for mixture gas separation of butane isomers.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed November 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42929.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Esekhile, Omoyemen Edoamen. “Mixed matrix membranes for mixture gas separation of butane isomers.” 2011. Web. 27 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Esekhile OE. Mixed matrix membranes for mixture gas separation of butane isomers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. [cited 2020 Nov 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42929.

Council of Science Editors:

Esekhile OE. Mixed matrix membranes for mixture gas separation of butane isomers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42929

2. Heffernan, Michael John. Biodegradable polymeric delivery systems for protein subunit vaccines.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2008, Georgia Tech

The prevention and treatment of cancer and infectious diseases requires vaccines that can mediate cytotoxic T lymphocyte-based immunity. A promising strategy is protein subunit vaccines composed of purified protein antigens and immunostimulatory adjuvants, such as Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. In this research, we developed two new biodegradable polymeric delivery vehicles for protein antigens and TLR agonists, as model vaccine delivery systems. This work was guided by the central hypothesis that an effective vaccine delivery system would have stimulus-responsive degradation and release, biodegradability into excretable non-acidic degradation products, and the ability to incorporate various TLR-inducing adjuvants. The first vaccine delivery system is a cross-linked polyion complex micelle which efficiently encapsulates proteins, DNA, and RNA. The micelle-based delivery system consists of a block copolymer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(L-lysine), cross-linked by dithiopyridyl side groups to provide transport stability and intracellular release. The second delivery system consists of solid biodegradable microparticles encapsulating proteins, nucleic acids, and hydrophobic compounds. The microparticles are composed of pH-sensitive polyketals, which are a new family of hydrophobic, linear polymers containing backbone ketal linkages. Polyketals are synthesized via a new polymerization method based on the acetal exchange reaction and degrade into non-acidic, excretable degradation products. In addition, the technique of hydrophobic ion pairing was utilized to enhance the encapsulation of ovalbumin, DNA, and RNA in polyketal microparticles via a single emulsion method. Using in vitro and in vivo immunological models, we demonstrated that the micelle- and polyketal-based vaccine delivery systems enhanced the cross-priming of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The model vaccines were composed of ovalbumin antigen and various TLR-inducing adjuvants including CpG-DNA, monophosphoryl lipid A, and dsRNA. The results demonstrate that the cross-linked micelles and polyketal microparticles have considerable potential as delivery systems for protein-based vaccines. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Niren Murthy (Committee Chair), Dr. Carson Meredith (Committee Member), Dr. Julia Babensee (Committee Member), Dr. Mark Prausnitz (Committee Member), Dr. Ravi Bellamkonda (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Vaccine delivery; Drug delivery; Microencapsulation; Nanospheres; Microspheres; Nanoparticles; Polyacetal; PH-responsive; TLR ligands; Poly(I)-poly(C); Acid-degradable; Vaccines; Polymeric drug delivery systems; Biodegradable plastics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Heffernan, M. J. (2008). Biodegradable polymeric delivery systems for protein subunit vaccines. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24787

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Heffernan, Michael John. “Biodegradable polymeric delivery systems for protein subunit vaccines.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed November 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24787.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Heffernan, Michael John. “Biodegradable polymeric delivery systems for protein subunit vaccines.” 2008. Web. 27 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Heffernan MJ. Biodegradable polymeric delivery systems for protein subunit vaccines. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. [cited 2020 Nov 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24787.

Council of Science Editors:

Heffernan MJ. Biodegradable polymeric delivery systems for protein subunit vaccines. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/24787


Georgia Tech

3. Hill, Elizabeth M. Benign Tunable Solvents for Improved Processing of Pharmaceutically Relevant Products and Catalysts.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2007, Georgia Tech

Sustainable technologies are vital to reducing the environmental impact of chemical enterprises. Solvents are often seen as just a medium in which a reaction takes place; however they can also play a dominant role in the overall toxicity of a typical pharmaceutical/fine chemicals batch chemical operation. Further, careful solvent selection for a reaction may also lead to more facile separation and purification of products, thus reducing the overall cost of a chemical process. This thesis presents an environmentally benign processing technique for sustainable biocatalytic reactions coupled with facile built-in separation. An organic aqueous tunable solvent (OATS) system allows access to a hydrophobic substrate which is transformed with a homogeneous enzymatic catalyst in a single liquid phase. Subsequent CO2 addition produces a biphasic mixture where the hydrophobic product partitions preferentially into the organic rich phase for separation while the hydrophilic enzyme catalyst partitions into the aqueous rich phase, where it is recyclable. Processing parameters in OATS systems are discussed and an overall product recovery of 80% is observed after six reaction cycles. Additionally, greater than 99% enantiomeric excess (ee) is shown for catalyzed hydrolysis of rac-1-phenylethyl acetate with Candida antarctica lipase B (CAL B) both before and after CO2-induced separation. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Charles A. Eckert (Committee Co-Chair), Dr. Charles L. Liotta (Committee Co-Chair), Dr. Andreas Bommarius (Committee Member), Dr. Carson Meredith (Committee Member), Dr. Hang Lu (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Gas-expanded liquids; Biphasic separation; Biocatalysis

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hill, E. M. (2007). Benign Tunable Solvents for Improved Processing of Pharmaceutically Relevant Products and Catalysts. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16320

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hill, Elizabeth M. “Benign Tunable Solvents for Improved Processing of Pharmaceutically Relevant Products and Catalysts.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed November 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16320.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hill, Elizabeth M. “Benign Tunable Solvents for Improved Processing of Pharmaceutically Relevant Products and Catalysts.” 2007. Web. 27 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Hill EM. Benign Tunable Solvents for Improved Processing of Pharmaceutically Relevant Products and Catalysts. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. [cited 2020 Nov 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16320.

Council of Science Editors:

Hill EM. Benign Tunable Solvents for Improved Processing of Pharmaceutically Relevant Products and Catalysts. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/16320

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