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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Dr. Bert Bras"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Daley, Wayne D. R. A Methodology for the Development of Machine Vision Algorithms Through the use of Human Visual Models.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2004, Georgia Tech

The development of machine vision algorithms for inspection and machine guidance has traditionally relied on the knowledge and experience of the developers as most of the techniques are based on heuristics and trial and error. This is especially problematic in the area of natural products where variability of the products is the rule rather than the exception. Humans are particularly good in functioning in this arena and in this thesis we look at the development of techniques derived from the functions of the human visual system (HVS). We first identify the significant processes in the HVS and highlight those that we believe are germane to the problems of interest. We then develop computational techniques using these methods and demonstrate their applicability to practical problems. This thesis uses the knowledge that the HVS is considered to consist of three sequential operations (sensing; encoding/transfer; and image interpretation) as a basis for developing a parallel procedure for a machine vision system. We have found that outputs derived from a simulation of the behaviors of receptive fields in the retina and in the higher levels of the brain can generate useful and robust features. Equivalent processes are then developed for machine applications under the guidance of a human operator to identify the areas of interest in the scene for the problem under consideration. Specifically we use the processes for encoding/transfer of data from the retina to develop techniques to enhance color contrasts, and compute color image features that are useful for defect detection and identification in real world images. This is accomplished by a transformation from image space to a characteristic response space that improves the robustness of classification. In this thesis the approach developed is applied to two industrial problems in the quality monitoring of meat and vegetables. The first problem concerns the quality monitoring of breast butterflies and the other the detection of defects on the surface of citrus. The approach is shown to derive algorithms that are robust and can be implemented at high rates of speed. Additionally we also identify a model within which further developments can be conducted as we learn more about the functioning of the HVS. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Kok-Meng Lee (Committee Chair), Dr. Bert Bras (Committee Member), Dr. Paul Griffin (Committee Member), Dr. Suresh Sitaraman (Committee Member), Dr. Ted Doll (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Machine vision; Color imaging; Natural products

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Daley, W. D. R. (2004). A Methodology for the Development of Machine Vision Algorithms Through the use of Human Visual Models. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/4996

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Daley, Wayne D R. “A Methodology for the Development of Machine Vision Algorithms Through the use of Human Visual Models.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/4996.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Daley, Wayne D R. “A Methodology for the Development of Machine Vision Algorithms Through the use of Human Visual Models.” 2004. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Daley WDR. A Methodology for the Development of Machine Vision Algorithms Through the use of Human Visual Models. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/4996.

Council of Science Editors:

Daley WDR. A Methodology for the Development of Machine Vision Algorithms Through the use of Human Visual Models. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/4996


Georgia Tech

2. Ling, Jay Michael. Managing Information Collection in Simulation-Based Design.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2006, Georgia Tech

An important element of successful engineering design is the effective management of resources to support design decisions. Design decisions can be thought of as having two phasesa formulation phase and a solution phase. As part of the formulation phase, engineers must decide how much information to collect and which models to use to support the design decision. Since more information and more accurate models come at a greater cost, a cost-benefit trade-off must be made. Previous work has considered such trade-offs in decision problems when all aspects of the decision problem can be represented using precise probabilities, an assumption that is not justified when information is sparse. In this thesis, we use imprecise probabilities to manage the information cost-benefit trade-off for two decision problems in which the quality of the information is imprecise: 1) The decision of when to stop collecting statistical data about a quantity that is characterized by a probability distribution with unknown parameters; and 2) The selection of the most preferred model to help guide a particular design decision when the model accuracy is characterized as an interval. For each case, a separate novel approach is developed in which the principles of information economics are incorporated into the information management decision. The problem of statistical data collection is explored with a pressure vessel design. This design problem requires the characterization of the probability distribution that describes a novel material's strength. The model selection approach is explored with the design of an I-beam structure. The designer must decide how accurate of a model to use to predict the maximum deflection in the span of the structure. For both problems, it is concluded that the information economic approach developed in this thesis can assist engineers in their information management decisions. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Chris Paredis (Committee Chair), Dr. Bert Bras (Committee Member), Dr. Suresh Sitaraman (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Model selection; Probability bounds analysis; Imprecise probabilites; Value of information; Information economics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ling, J. M. (2006). Managing Information Collection in Simulation-Based Design. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11504

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ling, Jay Michael. “Managing Information Collection in Simulation-Based Design.” 2006. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11504.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ling, Jay Michael. “Managing Information Collection in Simulation-Based Design.” 2006. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Ling JM. Managing Information Collection in Simulation-Based Design. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2006. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11504.

Council of Science Editors:

Ling JM. Managing Information Collection in Simulation-Based Design. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11504

3. Tejada, Francisco Javier. Quantifying the life cycle water consumption of a passenger vehicle.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2012, Georgia Tech

Various studies have pointed out the growing need to assess the availability of water sources in regions around the world as future forecasts suggest that water demands will increase significantly for agricultural, industrial and human consumption while freshwater resources are being depleted. One such emerging issue is the effect of industrial operations on said resources, specifically from automobiles. With numerous localities experiencing stresses on water availability, key stakeholders - suppliers, automakers, and vehicle end-users - need to better realize the effect vehicle manufacturing, usage, and disposal have on water resources. While efforts to improve the overall environmental performance of vehicles have mainly concentrated on improving technologies, there has also been considerable effort devoted to characterizing the life-cycle performance of the vehicle product system. However, much of this work has focused on energy consumption and carbon emissions while few studies have examined water. The difference between water use versus water consumption were highlighted and the life-cycle water consumption of a gasoline-powered midsize vehicle were analyzed from material extraction through production, use, and final disposition/end of life. This analysis examines each of the phases to determine a carĂ¢ s water footprint using data from the EcoInvent Life Cycle Analysis database as well as data collected from literature sources. Although water use is typically metered at the factory level, water consumption (i.e., water lost through evaporation and/or incorporation into a material, part, and/or product) is much harder to quantify. As shown in this thesis, the difference can be an order of magnitude or more because much of the water that goes into the different processes is either reused, recycled, or discharged back to its original source. The use phase of a vehicle has the biggest impact on the overall vehicle water consumption, followed by material production, whereas water consumption for the end of life processing seems to be relatively insignificant. It is also shown that the impact of energy consumption as part of the total water footprint is very large when compared to the other processes given the dependence on water for energy production. The assessment in this thesis represents a life-cycle inventory and serves as an initial benchmark as no previous study has been completed to determine the water consumption for the life of a vehicle, let alone for most other products. The impact of water consumption varies by region and locality, and a differentiation of impact would still be needed to determine whether the water consumption actually happens in water scarce regions or not. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Bert Bras (Committee Chair), Dr. Dirk Schaefer (Committee Member), Dr. Harry Cook (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Water; Vehicle; Life cycle; Inventory; Water consumption; Water use; Water consumption; Automobiles; Life cycle costing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tejada, F. J. (2012). Quantifying the life cycle water consumption of a passenger vehicle. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/43637

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tejada, Francisco Javier. “Quantifying the life cycle water consumption of a passenger vehicle.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/43637.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tejada, Francisco Javier. “Quantifying the life cycle water consumption of a passenger vehicle.” 2012. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Tejada FJ. Quantifying the life cycle water consumption of a passenger vehicle. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/43637.

Council of Science Editors:

Tejada FJ. Quantifying the life cycle water consumption of a passenger vehicle. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/43637

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