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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Dr Jung Choi"). One record found.

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Georgia Tech

1. Gokhale, Kavita Chandan. Interactions between endogenous prions, chaperones and polyglutamine proteins in the yeast model.

Degree: PhD, Biology, 2005, Georgia Tech

Poly-Q expanded exon 1 of huntingtin (Q103) fused to GFP is toxic to yeast cells containing endogenous yeast prions, [PIN+] ([RNQ+]) and/or [PSI+], which presumably serve as aggregation nuclei. Propagation of yeast prions is modulated by the chaperones of Hsp100/70/40 complex. While some chaperones were reported to influence poly-Q aggregation in yeast, it was not clear whether they do it directly or via affecting yeast prions. Our data show that while dominant negative Hsp104 mutants antagonize poly-Q aggregation and toxicity by eliminating endogenous yeast prions, some mutant alleles of Hsp104 decreases size and ameliorate toxicity of poly-Q aggregates without affecting prion propagation. Elevated levels of the yeast Hsp40 proteins, Ydj1 and Sis1, exhibit opposite effects on poly-Q aggregation and toxicity without influencing prion propagation. Among the yeast Hsp70s, only overproduction of Ssa4 antagonized poly-Q toxicity. We have also isolated dominant Anti-poly-Q-toxicity (AQT) mutants counteracting poly-Q toxicity only in the absence of the major ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ubc4. Prion forming potential of other Q-rich proteins and influence of Q and P-rich regions on prion propagation were also studied. Our data connects poly-Q aggregation and toxicity to the stress defense pathway in yeast. As many stress-defense proteins are conserved between yeast and mammals, our data shed light on possible mechanisms modulating poly-Q aggregation and toxicity in mammalian cells. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr Harish Radhakrishna (Committee Member), Dr Jung Choi (Committee Member), Dr Nick Hud (Committee Member), Dr Roger Wartell (Committee Member), Dr Yury Chernoff (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Chaperones; Glutamine; Molecular chaperones; Prions; Yeast

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gokhale, K. C. (2005). Interactions between endogenous prions, chaperones and polyglutamine proteins in the yeast model. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6856

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gokhale, Kavita Chandan. “Interactions between endogenous prions, chaperones and polyglutamine proteins in the yeast model.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6856.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gokhale, Kavita Chandan. “Interactions between endogenous prions, chaperones and polyglutamine proteins in the yeast model.” 2005. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Gokhale KC. Interactions between endogenous prions, chaperones and polyglutamine proteins in the yeast model. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6856.

Council of Science Editors:

Gokhale KC. Interactions between endogenous prions, chaperones and polyglutamine proteins in the yeast model. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6856

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