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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Dong Yao"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Chae, Han Gi. Polyacrylonitrile/carbon nanotube composite fibers: reinforcement efficiency and carbonization studies.

Degree: PhD, Polymer, Textile and Fiber Engineering, 2008, Georgia Tech

Polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/carbon nanotube (CNT) composite fibers were made using various processing methods such as conventional solution spinning, gel spinning, and bi-component gel spinning. The detailed characterization exhibited that the smaller and longer CNT will reinforce polymer matrix mostly in tensile strength and modulus, respectively. Gel spinning combined with CNT also showed the promising potential of PAN/CNT composite fiber as precursor fiber of the next generation carbon fiber. High resolution transmission electron microscopy showed the highly ordered PAN crystal layer on the CNT, which attributed to the enhanced physical properties. The subsequent carbonization study revealed that carbonized PAN/CNT fibers have at least 50% higher tensile strength and modulus as compared to those of carbonized PAN fibers. Electrical conductivity of CNT containing carbon fiber was also 50% higher than that of carbonized PAN fiber. In order to have carbon fiber with high tensile strength, the smaller diameter precursor fiber is preferable. Bi-component gel spinning produced 1-2 µm precursor fiber, resulting in ~1 µm carbon fiber. The tensile strength of the carbonized bi-component fiber (islands fibers) is as high as 6 GPa with tensile modulus of ~500 GPa. Further processing optimization may lead to the next generation carbon fiber. Advisors/Committee Members: Satish Kumar (Committee Chair), Anselm Griffin (Committee Member), Dong Yao (Committee Member), Naresh Thadhani (Committee Member), Samuel Graham (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Polyacrylonitrile; Carbon nanotube; Bi-component spinning; Gel spinning; Carbon fiber; Polymeric composites; Nanotubes; Carbon fibers; Fibrous composites; Spinning

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chae, H. G. (2008). Polyacrylonitrile/carbon nanotube composite fibers: reinforcement efficiency and carbonization studies. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/28125

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chae, Han Gi. “Polyacrylonitrile/carbon nanotube composite fibers: reinforcement efficiency and carbonization studies.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed May 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/28125.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chae, Han Gi. “Polyacrylonitrile/carbon nanotube composite fibers: reinforcement efficiency and carbonization studies.” 2008. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Chae HG. Polyacrylonitrile/carbon nanotube composite fibers: reinforcement efficiency and carbonization studies. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/28125.

Council of Science Editors:

Chae HG. Polyacrylonitrile/carbon nanotube composite fibers: reinforcement efficiency and carbonization studies. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/28125


Georgia Tech

2. Mhetre, Shamal Kamalakar. Effect of fabric structure on liquid transport, ink jet drop spreading and printing quality.

Degree: PhD, Polymer, Textile and Fiber Engineering, 2009, Georgia Tech

The effect of fabric structure and yarn-to-yarn liquid migration on the overall liquid transport behavior of fabrics is investigated in this research. Sorption of liquid from an unlimited reservoir as well as sorption of a limited quantity of liquid by fabrics representing different structural parameters is studied in detail. Sorption of a limited quantity of liquid is studied by performing drop spreading experiments on fabrics. The spreading and wicking of micron sized drops which are deposited on textile fabrics during ink jet printing is also studied. How the fabric structure related variables influence the spreading of ink drops and how exactly spreading influences printing quality is investigated in this research. Results showed that the wicking in fabrics is determined by the wicking rates of the yarns, thread spacing and more importantly by the rate at which liquid migrates from longitudinal to transverse threads and again from transverse threads back to longitudinal threads. Drop spreading rates were also determined by fabric structure. In general, compact and thinner fabrics showed highest drop spreading rates. Drop spreading rates are primarily affected by the manner and the rate at which liquid migrates from yarn to yarn. Analysis of the results of ink jet printing of pigment ink on textile fabrics showed that excessive drop spreading and higher line widths were observed where continuous and narrow capillaries prevail on the surface of yarns. Yarn surface characteristics are more important than fabric construction parameters. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Radhakrishnaiah Parachuru (Committee Chair), Dr. Dong Yao (Committee Member), Dr. Fred Cook (Committee Member), Dr. Wallace Carr (Committee Member), Dr. Yehia El Mogahzy (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Textile; Ink jet printing; Fabric Structure; Wicking; Liquid transport; Textile printing; Printing; Absorption; Drops

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mhetre, S. K. (2009). Effect of fabric structure on liquid transport, ink jet drop spreading and printing quality. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/28244

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mhetre, Shamal Kamalakar. “Effect of fabric structure on liquid transport, ink jet drop spreading and printing quality.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed May 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/28244.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mhetre, Shamal Kamalakar. “Effect of fabric structure on liquid transport, ink jet drop spreading and printing quality.” 2009. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Mhetre SK. Effect of fabric structure on liquid transport, ink jet drop spreading and printing quality. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/28244.

Council of Science Editors:

Mhetre SK. Effect of fabric structure on liquid transport, ink jet drop spreading and printing quality. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/28244

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