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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Cameron Sullards"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Momin, Amin Altaf. Application of bioinformatics in studies of sphingolipid biosynthesis.

Degree: PhD, Biology, 2010, Georgia Tech

The studies in this dissertation demonstrate that the gene expression pathway maps are useful tools to notice alteration in different branches of sphingolipid biosynthesis pathway based on microarray and other transcriptomic analysis. To facilitate the integrative analysis of gene expression and sphingolipid amounts, updated pathway maps were prepared using an open access visualization tool, Pathvisio v1.1. The datasets were formatted using Perl scripts and visualized with the aid of color coded pathway diagrams. Comparative analysis of transcriptomics and sphingolipid alterations from experimental studies and published literature revealed 72.8 % correlation between mRNA and sphingolipid differences (p-value < 0.0001 by the Fisher's exact test).The high correlation between gene expression differences and sphingolipid alterations highlights the application of this tool to evaluate molecular changes associate with sphingolipid alterations as well as predict differences in specific metabolites that can be experimentally verified using sensitive approaches such as mass spectrometry. In addition, bioinformatics sequence analysis was used to identify transcripts for sphingolipid biosynthesis enzyme 3-ketosphinganine reductase, and homology modeling studies helped in the evaluation of a cell line defective in sphingolipid metabolism due to mutation in the enzyme serine palmitoyltransferase, the first enzyme of de novo biosynthesis pathway. Hence, the combination of different bioinformatics approaches, including protein and DNA sequence analysis, structure modeling and pathway diagrams can provide valuable inputs for biochemical and molecular studies of sphingolipid metabolism. Advisors/Committee Members: Alfred H Merrill Jr (Committee Chair), Cameron Sullards (Committee Member), I King Jordan (Committee Member), Marion B. Sewer (Committee Member), Stephen C Harvey (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Pathway analysis; Pathway maps; Gene expression; Metabolomics; Cancer; Sphingolipids; Metabolism; Mass spectrometry; Biosynthesis; Eukaryotic cells; Prokaryotes; Bioinformatics; Biology Data processing

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APA (6th Edition):

Momin, A. A. (2010). Application of bioinformatics in studies of sphingolipid biosynthesis. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/34842

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Momin, Amin Altaf. “Application of bioinformatics in studies of sphingolipid biosynthesis.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed December 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/34842.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Momin, Amin Altaf. “Application of bioinformatics in studies of sphingolipid biosynthesis.” 2010. Web. 15 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Momin AA. Application of bioinformatics in studies of sphingolipid biosynthesis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2010. [cited 2019 Dec 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/34842.

Council of Science Editors:

Momin AA. Application of bioinformatics in studies of sphingolipid biosynthesis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/34842

2. Park, Hyejung. Characterization of ceramide synthases (Cers) in mammalian cells.

Degree: PhD, Biology, 2009, Georgia Tech

This thesis describes the characterization of ceramide (Cer) biosynthesis by mammalian cells. The possibility that Cer undergo developmental changes was explored using mouse embryonic stem cells versus embryoid bodies by analysis of the Cer subspecies by liquid chromatography, electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC ESI-MS/MS) and of the transcript levels for enzymes involved in Cer biosynthesis by qRT-PCR. Cer of embroid bodies had higher proportions of very-long-chain fatty acids, which correlated with the relative expression of mRNA for the respective Cer synthases (CerS) and fatty acyl-CoA elongases, as well as changes in the fatty acyl-CoA's of the cells. Therefore, it is clear that Cer subspecies change during embryogenesis, possibly for functionally important reasons. One CerS isoform, CerS2, was studied further because it has the broadest tissue distribution and a remarkable fatty acyl-CoA specificity, utilizing longer acyl-chain CoAs (C20-C26) in vitro. The fatty acid chain selectivity was refined by analysis of the Cer from livers from CerS2 null mice, which displayed very little Cer with fatty acyl chains with 24 + 2 carbons. Another interesting structural variation was discovered in studies of cells treated with fumonisin B1 (FB1), which inhibits CerS. Under these conditions, cells in culture and animals accumulate substantial amounts of a novel sphingoid base that was identified as 1-deoxysphinganine. This compound arises from utilization of L-alanine instead of L-serine by serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) based on the inability of LYB cells, which lack SPT, to make 1-deoxysphinganine. In the absence of FB1, 1-deoxysphinganine is primarily acylated to 1-deoxydihydroceramides. These are an underappreciated category of bioactive sphingoid bases and "ceramides" that might play important roles in cell regulation and disease. In summary, cells contain a wide variety of Cer subspecies that are determined by changes in expression of CerS, enzymes that produce co-substrates (such as fatty acyl-CoAs), and the types of amino acids utilized by SPT, the initial enzyme of de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis. One can envision how these changes might impact membranes structure as well as signaling by this family of highly bioactive compounds. Advisors/Committee Members: Alfred H. Merrill, Jr (Committee Chair), John Cairney (Committee Member), M. Cameron Sullards (Committee Member), Marion B. Sewer (Committee Member), Yuhong Fan (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Ceramide; Ceramide synthase; Sphingolipid; Ceramides; Biosynthesis; Biochemical engineering; Stem cells; Embryonic stem cells; Liquid chromatography; Chromatographic analysis

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Park, H. (2009). Characterization of ceramide synthases (Cers) in mammalian cells. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/29616

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Park, Hyejung. “Characterization of ceramide synthases (Cers) in mammalian cells.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed December 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/29616.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Park, Hyejung. “Characterization of ceramide synthases (Cers) in mammalian cells.” 2009. Web. 15 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Park H. Characterization of ceramide synthases (Cers) in mammalian cells. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. [cited 2019 Dec 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/29616.

Council of Science Editors:

Park H. Characterization of ceramide synthases (Cers) in mammalian cells. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/29616


Georgia Tech

3. Kollmeyer, Jessica Elaine. Regulation of Galactosylceramide Biosynthesis.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2006, Georgia Tech

An important branchpoint of mammalian sphingolipid metabolism occurs at the step where ceramides are glycosylated to glucosylceramide (GlcCer) versus galactosylceramide (GalCer), which are precursors of all mammalian glycosphingolipids. Relatively few studies have focused on this branchpoint because these monohexosylceramides are somewhat difficult to resolve chromatographically and because molecular biology tools have only recently become available to follow expression of these genes. The goal of this thesis is to better understand the mechanisms of cell regulation determining galactosylceramide synthesis. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Alfred Merrill Jr. (Committee Chair), Dr. M. Cameron Sullards (Committee Member), Dr. Marion Sewer (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Galacotsylceramide; Glycosphingolipids; Sphingolipids

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kollmeyer, J. E. (2006). Regulation of Galactosylceramide Biosynthesis. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11630

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kollmeyer, Jessica Elaine. “Regulation of Galactosylceramide Biosynthesis.” 2006. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed December 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11630.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kollmeyer, Jessica Elaine. “Regulation of Galactosylceramide Biosynthesis.” 2006. Web. 15 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Kollmeyer JE. Regulation of Galactosylceramide Biosynthesis. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2006. [cited 2019 Dec 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11630.

Council of Science Editors:

Kollmeyer JE. Regulation of Galactosylceramide Biosynthesis. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11630

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