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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Brockbank, Kelvin"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Ahmad, Hajira Fatima. Cryopreservation effects on a pancreatic substitute comprised of beta cells or recombinant myoblasts encapsulated in non-adhesive and adhesive alginate hydrogels.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2012, Georgia Tech

For clinical translation of a pancreatic substitute, long-term storage is essential, and cryopreservation is a promising means to achieve this goal. The two main cryopreservation methods are conventional freezing and vitrification, or ice-free cryopreservation. However, as both methods have their potential drawbacks for cryopreservation of a pancreatic substitute, they must be systematically evaluated in order to determine the appropriate method of cryopreservation. Furthermore, previous studies have indicated benefits to encapsulation in 3-D adhesive environments for pancreatic substitutes and that adhesion affects cell response to cryopreservation. Thus, the overall goal of this thesis was to investigate cryopreservation effects on model pancreatic substitutes consisting of cells encapsulated in non-adhesive and adhesive 3-D alginate hydrogels. Murine insulinoma betaTC-tet cells encapsulated in unmodified alginate hydrogels were chosen as the model pancreatic substitute in a non-adhesive 3-D environment. Murine myoblast C2C12 cells, stably transfected to secrete insulin, encapsulated in partially oxidized, RGD-modified alginate hydrogels were chosen as the model pancreatic substitute in a 3-D adhesive environment. With respect to cryopreservation effects on intermediary metabolism of betaTC-tet cells encapsulated in unmodified alginate, results indicate that relative carbon flow through the tricarboxylic acid cycle pathways examined is unaffected by cryopreservation. Additionally, insulin secretory function is maintained in Frozen constructs. However, vitrification by a cryopreservation cocktail referred to as DPS causes impairment in insulin secretion from encapsulated betaTC-tet cells, possibly due to a defect in late-stage insulin secretion. Results from Stable C2C12 cells encapsulated in RGD vs. RGE-alginate indicate that up to one day post-warming, cell-matrix interactions do not affect cellular response to cryopreservation after vitrification or freezing. Although there are differences in metabolic activity and insulin secretion immediately post-warming for DPS-vitrified RGD-encapsulated Stable C2C12 cells relative to Fresh controls, metabolic activity and insulin secretion are maintained at all time points assayed for Frozen constructs. Overall, due to results comparable to Fresh controls and simplicity of procedure, conventional freezing is appropriate for cryopreservation of betaTC-tet cells encapsulated in unmodified alginate or Stable C2C12 cells encapsulated in partially oxidized, RGD-modified alginate. Advisors/Committee Members: Sambanis, Athanassios (advisor), Brockbank, Kelvin (committee member), Simpson, Nicholas (committee member), Temenoff, Johnna (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Metabolic flux analysis; RGD-modified alginate; Adhesion; Tissue engineering; Cryopreservation of organs, tissues, etc.; Artificial pancreas; Tissue engineering; Alginates

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ahmad, H. F. (2012). Cryopreservation effects on a pancreatic substitute comprised of beta cells or recombinant myoblasts encapsulated in non-adhesive and adhesive alginate hydrogels. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/48968

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ahmad, Hajira Fatima. “Cryopreservation effects on a pancreatic substitute comprised of beta cells or recombinant myoblasts encapsulated in non-adhesive and adhesive alginate hydrogels.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed April 12, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/48968.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ahmad, Hajira Fatima. “Cryopreservation effects on a pancreatic substitute comprised of beta cells or recombinant myoblasts encapsulated in non-adhesive and adhesive alginate hydrogels.” 2012. Web. 12 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Ahmad HF. Cryopreservation effects on a pancreatic substitute comprised of beta cells or recombinant myoblasts encapsulated in non-adhesive and adhesive alginate hydrogels. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/48968.

Council of Science Editors:

Ahmad HF. Cryopreservation effects on a pancreatic substitute comprised of beta cells or recombinant myoblasts encapsulated in non-adhesive and adhesive alginate hydrogels. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/48968


Georgia Tech

2. Farooque, Tanya Mahbuba. Biochemical and mechanical stimuli for improved material properties and preservation of tissue-engineered cartilage.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2008, Georgia Tech

Articular cartilage on weight-bearing joints experiences three main forces: fluid-induced shear across the surface, perfusion through the cartilage from the surrounding fluid, and compression during motion of the joint. A new bioreactor that employs two of these forces was developed in this lab to study their effect on tissue-engineered cartilage development. The focus of this research and overall hypothesis is that bioreactors that employ both perfusion and shear will improve chondrogenesis and preservation to produce functionally relevant cartilage by modulating shear stress and introducing exogenous preservation factors. Applying both a low shear stress across the surface of cell-seeded scaffolds and perfusion through them in a perfusion concentric cylinder (PCC) bioreactor may stimulate chondrocytes to undergo chondrogenesis. Experimental data showed that the PCC bioreactor stimulated cartilage growth over the course of four weeks, supported by the appearance of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen type II, which are markers for articular cartilage. Computational fluid dynamics modeling showed that shear stress across the face of the construct was heterogeneous, and that only the center experienced a relatively uniform shear stress of 0.4 dynes/cm2 when the outer cup of the bioreactor rotated at 38 rpm. When compared to a concentric cylinder (CC) bioreactor that employed only shear stress, the PCC bioreactor caused a significant increase in cellular proliferation, which resulted in a 12-fold increase in cell number per construct compared to 7-fold increase within the CC bioreactor. However, the PCC bioreactor had a less pronounced effect on glycosaminoglycan and collagen content with 1.3 mg of GAG and 1.8 mg of collagen per construct within the CC bioreactor and 0.7 mg of GAG and 0.8 mg of collagen per construct within the PCC bioreactor after 28 days in culture (p < 0.05). Our results led to an important observation that the PCC bioreactor affected cellular proliferation significantly but not extracellular matrix synthesis. The next objective of this study focused on the PCC bioreactor to evaluate the direct role of perfusion and shear on chondrogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Advisors/Committee Members: Boyan, Barbara (Committee Chair), Wick, Timothy (Committee Chair), Brockbank, Kelvin (Committee Member), Nenes, Athanasios (Committee Member), Sambanis, Athanassios (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Cryopreservation; Shear stress; Perfusion; Bioreactors; Cartilage; Tissue engineering; Tissue engineering; Articular cartilage; Bioreactors Fluid dynamics; Computational fluid dynamics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Farooque, T. M. (2008). Biochemical and mechanical stimuli for improved material properties and preservation of tissue-engineered cartilage. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/26710

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Farooque, Tanya Mahbuba. “Biochemical and mechanical stimuli for improved material properties and preservation of tissue-engineered cartilage.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed April 12, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/26710.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Farooque, Tanya Mahbuba. “Biochemical and mechanical stimuli for improved material properties and preservation of tissue-engineered cartilage.” 2008. Web. 12 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Farooque TM. Biochemical and mechanical stimuli for improved material properties and preservation of tissue-engineered cartilage. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. [cited 2021 Apr 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/26710.

Council of Science Editors:

Farooque TM. Biochemical and mechanical stimuli for improved material properties and preservation of tissue-engineered cartilage. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/26710

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