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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Barabino, Gilda"). Showing records 1 – 9 of 9 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Ahmed, Faisal. Microfluidic devices for stiffness dependent enrichment of red blood cell subpopulations.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering (Joint GT/Emory Department), 2017, Georgia Tech

 Microfluidic devices were designed, fabricated and tested for enriching red blood cell subpopulations based on their stiffness. First, stiffness dependent margination of red blood cells… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Microfluidic devices; Separation; Margination; Enrichment; Stiffness; RBC; Red blood cell; Internal viscosity; Red blood cell subpopulations

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APA (6th Edition):

Ahmed, F. (2017). Microfluidic devices for stiffness dependent enrichment of red blood cell subpopulations. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60695

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ahmed, Faisal. “Microfluidic devices for stiffness dependent enrichment of red blood cell subpopulations.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60695.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ahmed, Faisal. “Microfluidic devices for stiffness dependent enrichment of red blood cell subpopulations.” 2017. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Ahmed F. Microfluidic devices for stiffness dependent enrichment of red blood cell subpopulations. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60695.

Council of Science Editors:

Ahmed F. Microfluidic devices for stiffness dependent enrichment of red blood cell subpopulations. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60695


Georgia Tech

2. Awojoodu, Anthony O. Sphingolipid dysregulation in erythrocytes during sickle cell disease contributes to pro-inflammatory microparticle generation and subsequent inflammatory cell activation.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering (Joint GT/Emory Department), 2014, Georgia Tech

 Sickle cell disease is a hereditary blood disorder caused by a point mutation in the gene encoding hemoglobin. This mutation causes hemoglobin molecules to polymerize… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Sickle cell disease; Inflammation; Sphingolipid; Microparticles

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APA (6th Edition):

Awojoodu, A. O. (2014). Sphingolipid dysregulation in erythrocytes during sickle cell disease contributes to pro-inflammatory microparticle generation and subsequent inflammatory cell activation. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/54286

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Awojoodu, Anthony O. “Sphingolipid dysregulation in erythrocytes during sickle cell disease contributes to pro-inflammatory microparticle generation and subsequent inflammatory cell activation.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/54286.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Awojoodu, Anthony O. “Sphingolipid dysregulation in erythrocytes during sickle cell disease contributes to pro-inflammatory microparticle generation and subsequent inflammatory cell activation.” 2014. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Awojoodu AO. Sphingolipid dysregulation in erythrocytes during sickle cell disease contributes to pro-inflammatory microparticle generation and subsequent inflammatory cell activation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/54286.

Council of Science Editors:

Awojoodu AO. Sphingolipid dysregulation in erythrocytes during sickle cell disease contributes to pro-inflammatory microparticle generation and subsequent inflammatory cell activation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/54286

3. Para, Andrea N. Preventing rapid platelet accumulation under very high shear stress.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2012, Georgia Tech

 Atherosclerosis is a major cause of mortality in industrialized nations. Atherosclerosis is characterized by plaque deposition which decreases the lumen diameter into a stenosis. The… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Atherosclerosis; Thrombosis; Platelet activation; Rapid platelet accumulation; Shear stress; Blood platelets Aggregation; Shear (Mechanics)

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APA (6th Edition):

Para, A. N. (2012). Preventing rapid platelet accumulation under very high shear stress. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/44726

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Para, Andrea N. “Preventing rapid platelet accumulation under very high shear stress.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/44726.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Para, Andrea N. “Preventing rapid platelet accumulation under very high shear stress.” 2012. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Para AN. Preventing rapid platelet accumulation under very high shear stress. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/44726.

Council of Science Editors:

Para AN. Preventing rapid platelet accumulation under very high shear stress. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/44726

4. Sargent, Carolyn Yeago. Effects of hydrodynamic culture on embryonic stem cell differentiation: cardiogenic modulation.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2010, Georgia Tech

 Stem and progenitor cells are an attractive cell source for the treatment of degenerative diseases due to their potential to differentiate into multiple cell types… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Embryonic stem cells; Embryoid body; Hydrodynamic; Bioprocessing; Differentiation; Cardiomyocyte; Heart cells; Degeneration (Pathology); Hydrodynamics; Embryonic stem cells Research

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APA (6th Edition):

Sargent, C. Y. (2010). Effects of hydrodynamic culture on embryonic stem cell differentiation: cardiogenic modulation. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/34710

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sargent, Carolyn Yeago. “Effects of hydrodynamic culture on embryonic stem cell differentiation: cardiogenic modulation.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/34710.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sargent, Carolyn Yeago. “Effects of hydrodynamic culture on embryonic stem cell differentiation: cardiogenic modulation.” 2010. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Sargent CY. Effects of hydrodynamic culture on embryonic stem cell differentiation: cardiogenic modulation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2010. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/34710.

Council of Science Editors:

Sargent CY. Effects of hydrodynamic culture on embryonic stem cell differentiation: cardiogenic modulation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/34710


Georgia Tech

5. Goldman, Stephen M. Development and validation of a microfluidic hydrogel platform for osteochondral tissue engineering.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2014, Georgia Tech

 Due to the inability of intra-articular injuries to adequately self-heal, current therapies are largely focused on palliative care and restoration of joint function rather than… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Osteochondral tissue engineering; Microfluidic hydrogels

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APA (6th Edition):

Goldman, S. M. (2014). Development and validation of a microfluidic hydrogel platform for osteochondral tissue engineering. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/54295

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Goldman, Stephen M. “Development and validation of a microfluidic hydrogel platform for osteochondral tissue engineering.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/54295.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Goldman, Stephen M. “Development and validation of a microfluidic hydrogel platform for osteochondral tissue engineering.” 2014. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Goldman SM. Development and validation of a microfluidic hydrogel platform for osteochondral tissue engineering. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/54295.

Council of Science Editors:

Goldman SM. Development and validation of a microfluidic hydrogel platform for osteochondral tissue engineering. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/54295

6. Yang, Yueh-Hsun. Development of hydrodynamically engineered cartilage in response to insulin-like growth factor-1 and transforming growth factor-beta1: formation and role of a type I collagen-based fibrous capsule.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering (Joint GT/Emory Department), 2013, Georgia Tech

 Articular cartilage which covers the surfaces of synovial joints is designed to allow smooth contact between long bones and to absorb shock induced during joint… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cartilage tissue engineering; Fibrous capsule; Hydrodynamic; Wavy-walled bioreactor; Insulin-like growth factor-1; Transforming growth factor-beta1; Articular cartilege; Tissue engineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Yang, Y. (2013). Development of hydrodynamically engineered cartilage in response to insulin-like growth factor-1 and transforming growth factor-beta1: formation and role of a type I collagen-based fibrous capsule. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/49072

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yang, Yueh-Hsun. “Development of hydrodynamically engineered cartilage in response to insulin-like growth factor-1 and transforming growth factor-beta1: formation and role of a type I collagen-based fibrous capsule.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/49072.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yang, Yueh-Hsun. “Development of hydrodynamically engineered cartilage in response to insulin-like growth factor-1 and transforming growth factor-beta1: formation and role of a type I collagen-based fibrous capsule.” 2013. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Yang Y. Development of hydrodynamically engineered cartilage in response to insulin-like growth factor-1 and transforming growth factor-beta1: formation and role of a type I collagen-based fibrous capsule. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/49072.

Council of Science Editors:

Yang Y. Development of hydrodynamically engineered cartilage in response to insulin-like growth factor-1 and transforming growth factor-beta1: formation and role of a type I collagen-based fibrous capsule. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/49072

7. Banton, Shereka. Human peripheral reticulocyte isolation and exosome release in vitro.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering (Joint GT/Emory Department), 2017, Georgia Tech

 The exosomes released by peripheral reticulocytes were originally thought to function as vehicles for protein clearance for the maturing cells. With the emergence of exosomes… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Reticulocytes; Exosomes

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APA (6th Edition):

Banton, S. (2017). Human peripheral reticulocyte isolation and exosome release in vitro. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/58256

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Banton, Shereka. “Human peripheral reticulocyte isolation and exosome release in vitro.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/58256.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Banton, Shereka. “Human peripheral reticulocyte isolation and exosome release in vitro.” 2017. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Banton S. Human peripheral reticulocyte isolation and exosome release in vitro. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/58256.

Council of Science Editors:

Banton S. Human peripheral reticulocyte isolation and exosome release in vitro. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/58256

8. Hovell, Candice Megan. Development of a novel In vitro blood brain barrier model for the evaluation of nanomedicines.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering (Joint GT/Emory Department), 2017, Georgia Tech

 In this work, we present a novel microfluidic lumen system of the BBB (MLS-BBB) for the evaluation of multifunctional nanomedicines engineered for the treatment of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Blood brain barrier; Organ on a chip

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APA (6th Edition):

Hovell, C. M. (2017). Development of a novel In vitro blood brain barrier model for the evaluation of nanomedicines. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60667

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hovell, Candice Megan. “Development of a novel In vitro blood brain barrier model for the evaluation of nanomedicines.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60667.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hovell, Candice Megan. “Development of a novel In vitro blood brain barrier model for the evaluation of nanomedicines.” 2017. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Hovell CM. Development of a novel In vitro blood brain barrier model for the evaluation of nanomedicines. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60667.

Council of Science Editors:

Hovell CM. Development of a novel In vitro blood brain barrier model for the evaluation of nanomedicines. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60667


Georgia Tech

9. Brown, Lola A. The Effects of Sickle Erythrocytes on Endothelial Permeability.

Degree: MS, Biomedical Engineering, 2005, Georgia Tech

 Sickle cell anemia is a hematological disorder that is caused by a single point mutation in the beta-globin chain of hemoglobin. It results in several… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Permeability coefficient; VE cadherin; Stroke; Endothelial cells; Sickle cell anemia

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Brown, L. A. (2005). The Effects of Sickle Erythrocytes on Endothelial Permeability. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6960

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brown, Lola A. “The Effects of Sickle Erythrocytes on Endothelial Permeability.” 2005. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6960.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brown, Lola A. “The Effects of Sickle Erythrocytes on Endothelial Permeability.” 2005. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Brown LA. The Effects of Sickle Erythrocytes on Endothelial Permeability. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6960.

Council of Science Editors:

Brown LA. The Effects of Sickle Erythrocytes on Endothelial Permeability. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/6960

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