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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Adegboyega K. Oyelere"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Biesso, Arianna. Plasmonic field effects on the spectroscopic and photobiological function of the photosynthetic system of bacteriorhodopsin.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2009, Georgia Tech

The first section of this thesis concerns the study of interactions between the intense local plasmonic field generated by nanostructure and a well known photosynthetic protein system, bacteriorhodopsin (bR). bR is a membrane protein responsible for proton transport. Among the many intermediates formed upon photoexcitations, two of the most relevant have been studied. The intermediates under studies were I460 and M412, and their decay dynamics were measured in presence of the plasmonic field generated by the excitation of their surface electrons using visible photons. Both intermediates decay lifetime were affected when the plasmonic field was turned on, and it was verify that thermal effect were not the source of the change in dynamic. The second part concerns the investigation of third-order nonlinearity of a series of extended conjugated squaraine dyes in the telecommunication spectral region. Their nonlinearity is measured via Degenerate Four Wave Mixing and Z-scan as function of the dyes increasing conjugation length and number of squarylium groups. The dyes produced large real and imaginary values for the third order nonlinearity in the 1300-1500 nm range which makes them attractive for optical limiting type of applications. Advisors/Committee Members: Mostafa A. El-Sayed (Committee Chair), Adegboyega K. Oyelere (Committee Member), Bridgette Barry (Committee Member), Joseph W. Perry (Committee Member), Mark R. Prausnitz (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Membrane protein function; Plasmonic field; Bacteriorhodopsin; Plasmons (Physics); Nanoparticles; Precious metals

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APA (6th Edition):

Biesso, A. (2009). Plasmonic field effects on the spectroscopic and photobiological function of the photosynthetic system of bacteriorhodopsin. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/28162

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Biesso, Arianna. “Plasmonic field effects on the spectroscopic and photobiological function of the photosynthetic system of bacteriorhodopsin.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/28162.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Biesso, Arianna. “Plasmonic field effects on the spectroscopic and photobiological function of the photosynthetic system of bacteriorhodopsin.” 2009. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Biesso A. Plasmonic field effects on the spectroscopic and photobiological function of the photosynthetic system of bacteriorhodopsin. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/28162.

Council of Science Editors:

Biesso A. Plasmonic field effects on the spectroscopic and photobiological function of the photosynthetic system of bacteriorhodopsin. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/28162

2. Hofmekler, Jonathan. Investigating the effect of membrane anchoring on photoinduced electron transfer pyrazoline based fluorescent probes.

Degree: MS, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2011, Georgia Tech

Fluorescence microscopy is a powerful analytical tool for visualizing biological processes at the subcellular level. In this regard, 1,3,5-triarylpyrazoline based fluorescent probes which act as "turn-on" probes, have been extensively researched. These probes achieve their fluorescence "turn-on" response by inhibition of fluorescence quenching by acceptor-excited photoinduced electron transfer upon binding of an analyte. It has been recently shown that some fluorescent probes used in biological research form colloids composed of nanoparticles, due to their hydrophobic character. This hydrophobic character can also lead to partitioning of the probe into cellular membranes. Colloid formation and membrane partitioning may affect the probes' photophysical properties such as absorption and emission wavelength and quantum yields. Recently, a series of 1,3,5-triarylpyrazolines synthesized in our group by M. T. Morgan, showed no formation of aggregates in aqueous buffer. Surprisingly, these probes increased their fluorescence intensity in the presence of liposomes. The photoinduced electron transfer process is greatly affected by the polarity of the medium in which the probe is used. In this study, the effect of membrane proximity on the photoinduced electron transfer process for pyrazoline based "turn-on" probes has been investigated. A series of water soluble 1,3,5-triarylpyrazolines have been synthesized in which a N,N-dialkylaniline moiety acts as an electron donor and a proton acceptor and an alkylated sulfonamide moiety acts as a molecular anchor for interaction with neutral and anionic liposomes. Advisors/Committee Members: Prof. Christoph J. Fahrni (Committee Chair), Dr. Adegboyega K. Oyelere (Committee Member), Dr. Wendy L. Kelly (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Pyrazoline; Liposomes; Photoinduced electron transfer; Fluorescence; Fluorescent probes; Fluorescence microscopy; Transition metals; Metal ions

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hofmekler, J. (2011). Investigating the effect of membrane anchoring on photoinduced electron transfer pyrazoline based fluorescent probes. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42896

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hofmekler, Jonathan. “Investigating the effect of membrane anchoring on photoinduced electron transfer pyrazoline based fluorescent probes.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42896.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hofmekler, Jonathan. “Investigating the effect of membrane anchoring on photoinduced electron transfer pyrazoline based fluorescent probes.” 2011. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Hofmekler J. Investigating the effect of membrane anchoring on photoinduced electron transfer pyrazoline based fluorescent probes. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2011. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42896.

Council of Science Editors:

Hofmekler J. Investigating the effect of membrane anchoring on photoinduced electron transfer pyrazoline based fluorescent probes. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42896

3. Keough, James M. Redox active tyrosines in photosystem II: role in proton coupled electron transfer reactions.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2013, Georgia Tech

Proton coupled electron transfer reactions often involve tyrosine residues, because when oxidized, the phenolic side chain deprotonates. Tyrosine Z (YZ) is responsible for extracting electrons in a stepwise fashion from the oxygen evolving-complex in order to build enough potential to oxidize water. This process requires that each step YZ must deprotonate and reprotonate in order to maintain the high midpoint potential that is necessary to oxidize the oxygen-evolving complex, which makes YZ highly involved in proton coupled electron transfer reactions. In this thesis YZ has been studied within oxygen-evolving photosystem II utilizing electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to monitor the tyrosyl radical that is formed upon light excitation. Kinetic analysis of YZ has shed light on the factors that are important for PSII to carry out water oxidation at the oxygen-evolving complex. Most notably the strong hydrogen-bonding network and the midpoint potential of YZ have been shown to be integral aspects of the water splitting reactions of PSII. By studying YZ within oxygen-evolving PSII, conclusions are readily applied to the native system. Advisors/Committee Members: Bridgette A. Barry (Committee Chair), Adegboyega K. Oyelere (Committee Member), Facundo Fernandez (Committee Member), Ingeborg Schmidt-Krey (Committee Member), Mostafa El-Sayed (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Photosystem II; Proton coupled electron transfer reactions; Tyrosine Z; Tyrosine D; YZ; YD; Water oxidation; Photosynthesis; Power resources Research; Photosynthetic reaction centers

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Keough, J. M. (2013). Redox active tyrosines in photosystem II: role in proton coupled electron transfer reactions. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47738

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Keough, James M. “Redox active tyrosines in photosystem II: role in proton coupled electron transfer reactions.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47738.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Keough, James M. “Redox active tyrosines in photosystem II: role in proton coupled electron transfer reactions.” 2013. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Keough JM. Redox active tyrosines in photosystem II: role in proton coupled electron transfer reactions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2013. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47738.

Council of Science Editors:

Keough JM. Redox active tyrosines in photosystem II: role in proton coupled electron transfer reactions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/47738

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