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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia State University" +contributor:("Richard D. Lakes, Ph.D."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Georgia State University

1. Childers Roberts, Amy. Gentrification and school choice: Where goes the neighborhood?.

Degree: PhD, Educational Policy Studies, 2012, Georgia State University

This dissertation explores parent-gentrifiers’ lived experiences of the school-selection process, including the social networking and the influence of those social networks in their selection of schools. School choice and parent involvement are forms of social capital, and such social capital represents the results of social networking and parental agency. The unknown is how this scenario manifests itself in gentrifying parents’ school-selection process in Atlanta’s Kirkwood and Grant Park neighborhoods. Gentrifying children’s absence in urban public schools is of interest as residential areas integrate, while schools (re)segregate. The research paradigm is interpretivist as it investigates the qualitatively different ways in which people experience or think about a phenomenon (Marton, 1986). Purposive snowball sampling is used to reach 30 eligible participants in two neighborhoods. The methodological approach is qualitative phenomenographic interviews. The research found five options considered by parent-gentrifiers in the school-selection process that are consistent with the previous literature: public school, charter school, private school, homeschool and undecided/not yet. The forms of communication utilized in the social networking were face-to-face, phone, e-mail, social networking sites, and texting. Participants varied by work schedule, neighborhood communication infrastructure, and level of social network in their forms of communication. Parent-gentrifiers’ approaches to school selection included: activating agency, social networking, operating in social spaces, their social agenda with regard to diversity, and their educational agenda with regard to curriculum, instruction, and school characteristics. The results show that while parents espouse racial and socioeconomic diversity, their choices in the option-demand system in Grant Park resulted in racial segregation among the schools. In contrast, the lack of formal options in Kirkwood resulted in racial integration in the public elementary school. The actions interpreted and ideas constructed in the process of selecting schools as a parent-gentrifier are of practical value to district efforts to understand the urban middle-class school-selection process. In light of increasing school segregation and student attrition, continued urban revitalization efforts and the sustainability of those efforts for many major cities in the United States is highly dependent on their ability to regenerate and maintain quality schools that attract the middle-class. Advisors/Committee Members: Richard D. Lakes, Ph.D., Sheryl A. Gowen, Ph.D., Patricia A. Carter, Ph.D., Katherine B. Hankins, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: gentrification; school choice; urban schools; parent-gentrifiers; phenomenography; Education; Education Policy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Childers Roberts, A. (2012). Gentrification and school choice: Where goes the neighborhood?. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/eps_diss/88

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Childers Roberts, Amy. “Gentrification and school choice: Where goes the neighborhood?.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed July 23, 2019. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/eps_diss/88.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Childers Roberts, Amy. “Gentrification and school choice: Where goes the neighborhood?.” 2012. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Childers Roberts A. Gentrification and school choice: Where goes the neighborhood?. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2012. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/eps_diss/88.

Council of Science Editors:

Childers Roberts A. Gentrification and school choice: Where goes the neighborhood?. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2012. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/eps_diss/88


Georgia State University

2. Kenyon, Joy R. Towards Racial Reconciliation: An Oral History Inquiry Examining Race And Reconciliation In The Context Of Mercer University's Beloved Community.

Degree: PhD, Educational Policy Studies, 2017, Georgia State University

Informed by archival data and oral history interviews, this dissertation explored stories of the lived experiences of the stakeholders of Mercer University’s Beloved Community. The goal was to gain insight into how higher educational institutions (HEIs) engaged community partners to address long-term racial injury through the process of racial reconciliation. This study included the insights of 18 participants in a racial reconciliation project named the Beloved Community; which began in 2005 and was sponsored by Mercer University, a private higher educational institution; formerly affiliated with the Georgia Baptist Convention. An aim of the project was to sustain a frank discourse within a safe, public forum, that would address the present and past injuries of racial segregation at the local church level and include the injured in problem solving. Mercer is one of few formerly segregated southern universities engaged in such an endeavor. The research questions were: 1) What do Mercer University’s Beloved Community stakeholders perceive as the primary goals of higher educational institutions in addressing racial reconciliation? 2) What are Mercer University’s Beloved Community stakeholders’ perceptions and lived experiences of racial reconciliation, through this project? 3) What patterns and contradictions are there in the stakeholders’ stories about their perceptions and lived experiences of racial reconciliation? The findings validate the research of Androff (2012) that reconciliation is a slow process, occurring at multiple levels, and provides insights into such an endeavor at a local level. Further, this study found that enactment of the project is influenced by social identity, collective memory, and intergroup interaction. A culture of social reconciliation, in the form of building interpersonal relationships and creating forums for racial dialogue, was the dominant form of reconciliation found within Mercer’s Beloved Community. This study is significant in examining the role of HEIs who include community partners to extend sustained scholarship, learning, and civic engagement. Advisors/Committee Members: Richard D. Lakes, Ph.D., Patricia A. Carter, Ph.D., Joyce E. King, Ph.D., Jodi Kaufmann, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: Community engagement scholarship; Higher educational institutions; Racial reconciliation; Wicked problems; Beloved community.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kenyon, J. R. (2017). Towards Racial Reconciliation: An Oral History Inquiry Examining Race And Reconciliation In The Context Of Mercer University's Beloved Community. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/eps_diss/171

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kenyon, Joy R. “Towards Racial Reconciliation: An Oral History Inquiry Examining Race And Reconciliation In The Context Of Mercer University's Beloved Community.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed July 23, 2019. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/eps_diss/171.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kenyon, Joy R. “Towards Racial Reconciliation: An Oral History Inquiry Examining Race And Reconciliation In The Context Of Mercer University's Beloved Community.” 2017. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Kenyon JR. Towards Racial Reconciliation: An Oral History Inquiry Examining Race And Reconciliation In The Context Of Mercer University's Beloved Community. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2017. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/eps_diss/171.

Council of Science Editors:

Kenyon JR. Towards Racial Reconciliation: An Oral History Inquiry Examining Race And Reconciliation In The Context Of Mercer University's Beloved Community. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2017. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/eps_diss/171

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