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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia State University" +contributor:("Erin B. Tone"). Showing records 1 – 16 of 16 total matches.

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Georgia State University

1. Hill, Mary. Compassion-Focused Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Eating Disorders: A Multiple Baseline across Participants Study.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2017, Georgia State University

  This study used a multiple baseline across participants design to demonstrate a functional relationship between a compassion-focused acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) intervention and… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: acceptance and commitment therapy; eating disorders; body image flexibility; self-compassion

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APA (6th Edition):

Hill, M. (2017). Compassion-Focused Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Eating Disorders: A Multiple Baseline across Participants Study. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/172

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hill, Mary. “Compassion-Focused Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Eating Disorders: A Multiple Baseline across Participants Study.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed August 06, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/172.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hill, Mary. “Compassion-Focused Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Eating Disorders: A Multiple Baseline across Participants Study.” 2017. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Hill M. Compassion-Focused Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Eating Disorders: A Multiple Baseline across Participants Study. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2017. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/172.

Council of Science Editors:

Hill M. Compassion-Focused Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Eating Disorders: A Multiple Baseline across Participants Study. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2017. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/172


Georgia State University

2. Calamaras, Martha. Cost and Probability Biases in Social Phobia: Evaluating Their Relation to Attention Bias and Treatment Outcome.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2014, Georgia State University

  Social phobia is maintained in part by judgmental biases concerning the probability and cost of negative social events. One hypothesized mechanism of action of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cost bias; Probability bias; Attention bias; Social phobia

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APA (6th Edition):

Calamaras, M. (2014). Cost and Probability Biases in Social Phobia: Evaluating Their Relation to Attention Bias and Treatment Outcome. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/128

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Calamaras, Martha. “Cost and Probability Biases in Social Phobia: Evaluating Their Relation to Attention Bias and Treatment Outcome.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed August 06, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/128.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Calamaras, Martha. “Cost and Probability Biases in Social Phobia: Evaluating Their Relation to Attention Bias and Treatment Outcome.” 2014. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Calamaras M. Cost and Probability Biases in Social Phobia: Evaluating Their Relation to Attention Bias and Treatment Outcome. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2014. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/128.

Council of Science Editors:

Calamaras M. Cost and Probability Biases in Social Phobia: Evaluating Their Relation to Attention Bias and Treatment Outcome. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2014. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/128


Georgia State University

3. Fani, Negar. Neural Correlates of Attention Bias in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A fMRI Study.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2011, Georgia State University

  Attention biases to trauma-related information contribute to symptom maintenance in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD); this phenomenon has been observed through various behavioral studies, although… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder; Attention bias; Trauma; fMRI; Amygdala; ACC; dlPFC; vmPFC; Race; Facial expression; Neuroimaging; Cognition

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APA (6th Edition):

Fani, N. (2011). Neural Correlates of Attention Bias in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A fMRI Study. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/87

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fani, Negar. “Neural Correlates of Attention Bias in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A fMRI Study.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed August 06, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/87.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fani, Negar. “Neural Correlates of Attention Bias in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A fMRI Study.” 2011. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Fani N. Neural Correlates of Attention Bias in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A fMRI Study. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2011. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/87.

Council of Science Editors:

Fani N. Neural Correlates of Attention Bias in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A fMRI Study. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2011. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/87


Georgia State University

4. Hudepohl, Adam D. The Impact of Friendship Closeness and Hegemonic Masculinity on Group Perpetrated Antigay Aggression.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2011, Georgia State University

  The purpose of this study was to empirically evaluate hypothesized risk factors for the perpetration of antigay aggression. Specifically, the independent and interactive effects… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Aggression; Violence; Hate crimes; Antigay violence; GLBT studies; Group aggression; Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Hudepohl, A. D. (2011). The Impact of Friendship Closeness and Hegemonic Masculinity on Group Perpetrated Antigay Aggression. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/88

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hudepohl, Adam D. “The Impact of Friendship Closeness and Hegemonic Masculinity on Group Perpetrated Antigay Aggression.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed August 06, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/88.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hudepohl, Adam D. “The Impact of Friendship Closeness and Hegemonic Masculinity on Group Perpetrated Antigay Aggression.” 2011. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Hudepohl AD. The Impact of Friendship Closeness and Hegemonic Masculinity on Group Perpetrated Antigay Aggression. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2011. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/88.

Council of Science Editors:

Hudepohl AD. The Impact of Friendship Closeness and Hegemonic Masculinity on Group Perpetrated Antigay Aggression. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2011. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/88


Georgia State University

5. Cobb, Jean E. Child and Parent Readiness to Change in a Clinical Sample of Obese Youth.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2011, Georgia State University

 Parent and child readiness to change have been identified as emerging areas informing pediatric obesity interventions. The purpose of this study was to increase understanding… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: pediatric obesity; transtheoretical model; stages of change; psychosocial functioning; social anxiety; depression; Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Cobb, J. E. (2011). Child and Parent Readiness to Change in a Clinical Sample of Obese Youth. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/76

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cobb, Jean E. “Child and Parent Readiness to Change in a Clinical Sample of Obese Youth.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed August 06, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/76.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cobb, Jean E. “Child and Parent Readiness to Change in a Clinical Sample of Obese Youth.” 2011. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Cobb JE. Child and Parent Readiness to Change in a Clinical Sample of Obese Youth. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2011. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/76.

Council of Science Editors:

Cobb JE. Child and Parent Readiness to Change in a Clinical Sample of Obese Youth. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2011. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/76


Georgia State University

6. Francis, Sara M S. Examining Cognitive Predictors of Parental Rescue Behavior and Potential Malleability of Behavior Using a Psychoeducation Intervention.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2016, Georgia State University

  Over-controlling parenting practices, particularly parents’ tendency to “rescue” children from experiencing distress, both limit children’s exposure to anxiety-provoking situations and restrict opportunities for development… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Parent beliefs; Parent behavior; Rescue; Psychoeducation; Child anxiety

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APA (6th Edition):

Francis, S. M. S. (2016). Examining Cognitive Predictors of Parental Rescue Behavior and Potential Malleability of Behavior Using a Psychoeducation Intervention. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/169

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Francis, Sara M S. “Examining Cognitive Predictors of Parental Rescue Behavior and Potential Malleability of Behavior Using a Psychoeducation Intervention.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed August 06, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/169.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Francis, Sara M S. “Examining Cognitive Predictors of Parental Rescue Behavior and Potential Malleability of Behavior Using a Psychoeducation Intervention.” 2016. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Francis SMS. Examining Cognitive Predictors of Parental Rescue Behavior and Potential Malleability of Behavior Using a Psychoeducation Intervention. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2016. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/169.

Council of Science Editors:

Francis SMS. Examining Cognitive Predictors of Parental Rescue Behavior and Potential Malleability of Behavior Using a Psychoeducation Intervention. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2016. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/169


Georgia State University

7. Garn, Cheryl. An Examination of Associations among Components of Mindfulness and Women's Attention Bias to Sad Faces.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2016, Georgia State University

  Mindfulness, a set of techniques for engaging with stimuli in the present-moment environment, has recently received considerable attention in the literature. Mindfulness is drawn… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Mindfulness; Attention; Acceptance; Attention Bias

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APA (6th Edition):

Garn, C. (2016). An Examination of Associations among Components of Mindfulness and Women's Attention Bias to Sad Faces. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/149

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Garn, Cheryl. “An Examination of Associations among Components of Mindfulness and Women's Attention Bias to Sad Faces.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed August 06, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/149.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Garn, Cheryl. “An Examination of Associations among Components of Mindfulness and Women's Attention Bias to Sad Faces.” 2016. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Garn C. An Examination of Associations among Components of Mindfulness and Women's Attention Bias to Sad Faces. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2016. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/149.

Council of Science Editors:

Garn C. An Examination of Associations among Components of Mindfulness and Women's Attention Bias to Sad Faces. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2016. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/149


Georgia State University

8. Hipp, Tracy N. Risk Factors for Sexual Assault: Can Existing Theories Explain Bisexual Women's Disproportionate Risk?.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2016, Georgia State University

  Many women experience sexual violence, but bisexual women are at particularly high risk for such victimization. Theories attempting to explain women’s risk for sexual… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Sexual violence; Rape; Sexual assault risk factors; Sexual minority women; Lesbian; Bisexual

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APA (6th Edition):

Hipp, T. N. (2016). Risk Factors for Sexual Assault: Can Existing Theories Explain Bisexual Women's Disproportionate Risk?. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/151

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hipp, Tracy N. “Risk Factors for Sexual Assault: Can Existing Theories Explain Bisexual Women's Disproportionate Risk?.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed August 06, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/151.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hipp, Tracy N. “Risk Factors for Sexual Assault: Can Existing Theories Explain Bisexual Women's Disproportionate Risk?.” 2016. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Hipp TN. Risk Factors for Sexual Assault: Can Existing Theories Explain Bisexual Women's Disproportionate Risk?. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2016. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/151.

Council of Science Editors:

Hipp TN. Risk Factors for Sexual Assault: Can Existing Theories Explain Bisexual Women's Disproportionate Risk?. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2016. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/151


Georgia State University

9. Hegberg, Nicole J. Cognitive control as a mechanism linking regular physical activity and emotional health.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2017, Georgia State University

  Growing bodies of research suggests associations between regular physical activity (PA) and emotional health. One promising mechanism of this association is a cognitive process… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Physical activity; Exercise; Cognition; Cognitive control; Executive functioning; Emotional processing; Emotion regulation

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APA (6th Edition):

Hegberg, N. J. (2017). Cognitive control as a mechanism linking regular physical activity and emotional health. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/166

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hegberg, Nicole J. “Cognitive control as a mechanism linking regular physical activity and emotional health.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed August 06, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/166.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hegberg, Nicole J. “Cognitive control as a mechanism linking regular physical activity and emotional health.” 2017. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Hegberg NJ. Cognitive control as a mechanism linking regular physical activity and emotional health. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2017. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/166.

Council of Science Editors:

Hegberg NJ. Cognitive control as a mechanism linking regular physical activity and emotional health. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2017. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/166


Georgia State University

10. Jayakar, Reema. Amygdala Volume and Social Anxiety Symptom Severity: A Mutli-method Study.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2017, Georgia State University

  Neuroimaging research has strongly influenced a biologically-based conceptualization of social anxiety, which is the fear of evaluation from others. Functional neuroimaging research has shown… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Amygdala; Volume; Social anxiety; Structural neuroimaging; Freesurfer; SAD

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APA (6th Edition):

Jayakar, R. (2017). Amygdala Volume and Social Anxiety Symptom Severity: A Mutli-method Study. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/178

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jayakar, Reema. “Amygdala Volume and Social Anxiety Symptom Severity: A Mutli-method Study.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed August 06, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/178.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jayakar, Reema. “Amygdala Volume and Social Anxiety Symptom Severity: A Mutli-method Study.” 2017. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Jayakar R. Amygdala Volume and Social Anxiety Symptom Severity: A Mutli-method Study. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2017. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/178.

Council of Science Editors:

Jayakar R. Amygdala Volume and Social Anxiety Symptom Severity: A Mutli-method Study. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2017. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/178

11. Ronkin, Emily. Hostile Attribution Biases And Externalizing Behaviors: The Influence Of Parenting Practices.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2017, Georgia State University

  Children’s social information processing (SIP) encompasses cognitive and behavioral sequence that underlies social responses. SIP in peer interactions is well studied. Less is known… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Children; Social information processing; Monitoring; Consistent discipline; Hostile attribution of intent biases; Parenting; Aggression; Rule-breaking

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APA (6th Edition):

Ronkin, E. (2017). Hostile Attribution Biases And Externalizing Behaviors: The Influence Of Parenting Practices. (Thesis). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/161

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ronkin, Emily. “Hostile Attribution Biases And Externalizing Behaviors: The Influence Of Parenting Practices.” 2017. Thesis, Georgia State University. Accessed August 06, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/161.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ronkin, Emily. “Hostile Attribution Biases And Externalizing Behaviors: The Influence Of Parenting Practices.” 2017. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Ronkin E. Hostile Attribution Biases And Externalizing Behaviors: The Influence Of Parenting Practices. [Internet] [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2017. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/161.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ronkin E. Hostile Attribution Biases And Externalizing Behaviors: The Influence Of Parenting Practices. [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2017. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/161

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

12. Mehta, Natasha. Cognitive Biases in Social Anxiety Disorder: Examining Interpretation and Attention Biases and Their Relation to Anxious Behavior.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2016, Georgia State University

  Information processing biases, such as interpretation bias and attention bias, play a significant role in social anxiety disorder (Williams et al., 1997). Interpretation bias… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: social anxiety; cognitive biases; interpretation bias; attention bias; behavior

…Internet, flyers), referrals from local clinicians, and the Georgia State University SONA… 

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APA (6th Edition):

Mehta, N. (2016). Cognitive Biases in Social Anxiety Disorder: Examining Interpretation and Attention Biases and Their Relation to Anxious Behavior. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/150

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mehta, Natasha. “Cognitive Biases in Social Anxiety Disorder: Examining Interpretation and Attention Biases and Their Relation to Anxious Behavior.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed August 06, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/150.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mehta, Natasha. “Cognitive Biases in Social Anxiety Disorder: Examining Interpretation and Attention Biases and Their Relation to Anxious Behavior.” 2016. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Mehta N. Cognitive Biases in Social Anxiety Disorder: Examining Interpretation and Attention Biases and Their Relation to Anxious Behavior. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2016. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/150.

Council of Science Editors:

Mehta N. Cognitive Biases in Social Anxiety Disorder: Examining Interpretation and Attention Biases and Their Relation to Anxious Behavior. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2016. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/150

13. McManus, Susan M. Visual Scanning of Dynamic Affective Stimuli in Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2012, Georgia State University

  The accurate integration of audio-visual emotion cues is critical for social interactions and requires efficient processing of facial cues. Gaze behavior of typically developing… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Autism Spectrum Disorders; Emotion perception; Eye-tracking; Gaze behavior; Face processing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McManus, S. M. (2012). Visual Scanning of Dynamic Affective Stimuli in Autism Spectrum Disorders. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/105

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McManus, Susan M. “Visual Scanning of Dynamic Affective Stimuli in Autism Spectrum Disorders.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed August 06, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/105.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McManus, Susan M. “Visual Scanning of Dynamic Affective Stimuli in Autism Spectrum Disorders.” 2012. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

McManus SM. Visual Scanning of Dynamic Affective Stimuli in Autism Spectrum Disorders. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2012. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/105.

Council of Science Editors:

McManus SM. Visual Scanning of Dynamic Affective Stimuli in Autism Spectrum Disorders. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2012. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_diss/105


Georgia State University

14. Calamaras, Martha R. Evaluating Changes in Attentional Biases following Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Social Phobia.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2010, Georgia State University

  The purpose of the current study was to evaluate changes in attentional biases following CBT for Social Phobia. It was found that 1.) consistent… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Attention bias; Social anxiety; Cognitive behavioral therapy; Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Calamaras, M. R. (2010). Evaluating Changes in Attentional Biases following Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Social Phobia. (Thesis). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/79

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Calamaras, Martha R. “Evaluating Changes in Attentional Biases following Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Social Phobia.” 2010. Thesis, Georgia State University. Accessed August 06, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/79.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Calamaras, Martha R. “Evaluating Changes in Attentional Biases following Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Social Phobia.” 2010. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Calamaras MR. Evaluating Changes in Attentional Biases following Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Social Phobia. [Internet] [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2010. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/79.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Calamaras MR. Evaluating Changes in Attentional Biases following Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Social Phobia. [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2010. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/79

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Georgia State University

15. Schroth, Elizabeth A. Associations between Maternal Positive Affect and Mother-Child Reminiscing about Happiness.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2010, Georgia State University

 Little is known about how maternal positive affect (PA) relates to maternal patterns of emotion socialization about positive emotions. The current study examined the hypothesis… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Positive affect; Emotion Socialization; Mother-child interactions; Preschool age children; Parent-Child Early Relational Assessment; Reminiscing; Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Schroth, E. A. (2010). Associations between Maternal Positive Affect and Mother-Child Reminiscing about Happiness. (Thesis). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/82

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schroth, Elizabeth A. “Associations between Maternal Positive Affect and Mother-Child Reminiscing about Happiness.” 2010. Thesis, Georgia State University. Accessed August 06, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/82.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schroth, Elizabeth A. “Associations between Maternal Positive Affect and Mother-Child Reminiscing about Happiness.” 2010. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Schroth EA. Associations between Maternal Positive Affect and Mother-Child Reminiscing about Happiness. [Internet] [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2010. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/82.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Schroth EA. Associations between Maternal Positive Affect and Mother-Child Reminiscing about Happiness. [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2010. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/82

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Georgia State University

16. McManus, Susan M. Gaze Fixation during the Perception of Visual and Auditory Affective Cues.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2009, Georgia State University

  The accurate integration of audio-visual emotion cues is critical for social interactions and requires efficient processing of facial cues. Gaze behavior of typically developing… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Emotion perception; Eye-tracking; Gaze behavior; Face processing; Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

McManus, S. M. (2009). Gaze Fixation during the Perception of Visual and Auditory Affective Cues. (Thesis). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/70

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McManus, Susan M. “Gaze Fixation during the Perception of Visual and Auditory Affective Cues.” 2009. Thesis, Georgia State University. Accessed August 06, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/70.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McManus, Susan M. “Gaze Fixation during the Perception of Visual and Auditory Affective Cues.” 2009. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

McManus SM. Gaze Fixation during the Perception of Visual and Auditory Affective Cues. [Internet] [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2009. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/70.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

McManus SM. Gaze Fixation during the Perception of Visual and Auditory Affective Cues. [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2009. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/70

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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