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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia State University" +contributor:("Dr. Juan Rogers"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Georgia State University

1. Huang, Xi. Immigration, Regional Resilience, and Local Economic Development Policy.

Degree: PhD, Public Management and Policy, 2017, Georgia State University

The rapid growth of immigrants across a wide range of U.S. metropolitan areas has brought increasing attention to immigration and its impacts on regional development. Recent economic recessions have also stimulated a renewed interest in sustainable development among urban planners and scholars. This dissertation examines the role of immigrants in regional economic resilience and the effects of the rising wave of local immigrant integration policies. Drawing on data from various sources, including the U.S. Decennial Census, the Bureau of Economic Analysis, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the Building Resilient Regions (BRR) database, this dissertation explores three independent but interconnected themes. The first theme focuses on resilience capacity and examines how immigrants have helped U.S. regions build resilience capacity over the period 1980-2010. With a fixed effects approach, this investigation finds that immigrants contribute to the development of the economic capacity, socio-demographic capacity, and community connectivity capacity of regional systems, though some of the effects are small. The second theme considers regional economic resilience in the face of the recent Great Recession. Its focus is on how regions respond to and recover from the recession, different from the resilience capacity perspective that emphasizes preparedness for disturbances. To address the potential endogeneity of immigrants’ residential choice, this analysis employs an instrumental variable approach to isolate the portion of immigration exogenous to the local economic conditions. It finds that high levels of immigration lead to regional resilience during and after the recession in both employment and per capita income growth. This positive relationship is independent of other regional capacities identified in previous studies, suggesting that the resilience literature should broaden its scope and consider local immigration as a critical contributor to resilience building. Focusing on the Global Detroit initiative as a case study, the third theme investigates whether the latest local immigrant policies have achieved their intended goals. Global Detroit is one of the earliest regional immigrant integration efforts in the country, therefore providing a long enough post-treatment period for evaluation. This analysis constructs a synthetic control group almost identical to Detroit and finds mixed evidence of the program effects on local immigration level, immigrant employment, and immigrant entrepreneurship. While the Global Detroit initiative has increased immigrants’ shares in the local population and workforce, it has not increased their upward mobility as indicated by the average wage earning and self-employment rate. These findings underscore the potential of immigrant integration programs in attracting and retaining immigrants as well as the need for program improvement to address broader labor market dynamics and developmental issues. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Cathy Yang Liu, Dr. Ann-Margaret Esnard, Dr. Carlianne Patrick, Dr. Juan Rogers, Dr. Ross Rubenstein.

Subjects/Keywords: Immigration; local immigration policy; economic resilience; regional development

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APA (6th Edition):

Huang, X. (2017). Immigration, Regional Resilience, and Local Economic Development Policy. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/pmap_diss/69

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Huang, Xi. “Immigration, Regional Resilience, and Local Economic Development Policy.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed January 19, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/pmap_diss/69.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Huang, Xi. “Immigration, Regional Resilience, and Local Economic Development Policy.” 2017. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Huang X. Immigration, Regional Resilience, and Local Economic Development Policy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2017. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/pmap_diss/69.

Council of Science Editors:

Huang X. Immigration, Regional Resilience, and Local Economic Development Policy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2017. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/pmap_diss/69


Georgia State University

2. Brice, Kathryn T. The Effect of Linkages on Science and Technology at Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

Degree: PhD, Public Management and Policy, 2006, Georgia State University

Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) face the 21st century with questions about change and adaptation to an increasingly science and technology oriented society. They face the challenge of finding a strategy by which they can utilize current resources and energy to maximize their science and technology development. Using a mixed methods research design, this study conducted an analysis of science and technology at HBCUs. The primary objective was to determine what theories (when implemented they are termed strategies) account for the development of science and technology at successful research oriented HBCUs. This was accomplished through a secondary objective – to assess productivity outputs at HBCUs using various science and technology indices. The results and findings can be summarized by stating that the selection of strategy is dependent on the maturity of the HBCU’s science and technology program. An HBCU that is seeking to initiate a science and technology program should pursue a strategy of federal or state policy supportive of introductory efforts. HBCUs with established science and technology programs that are seeking growth strategies should look toward collaborations and partnerships for the purposes of forming networks and clusters. The formation of joint ventures, partnerships, and networks will further develop their science and technology programs. Leadership is a sustaining factor that enhances the effectiveness of both policy and linkages. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Amy Helling, Dr. Bhaven Sampat, Dr. Juan Rogers, Dr. Philip Shapira, Dr. Willie Pearson, Jr..

Subjects/Keywords: higher education; research; HBCU; clusters and networks; industry and education; universities and colleges; Public Affairs, Public Policy and Public Administration

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Brice, K. T. (2006). The Effect of Linkages on Science and Technology at Historically Black Colleges and Universities. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/pmap_diss/9

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brice, Kathryn T. “The Effect of Linkages on Science and Technology at Historically Black Colleges and Universities.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed January 19, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/pmap_diss/9.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brice, Kathryn T. “The Effect of Linkages on Science and Technology at Historically Black Colleges and Universities.” 2006. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Brice KT. The Effect of Linkages on Science and Technology at Historically Black Colleges and Universities. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2006. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/pmap_diss/9.

Council of Science Editors:

Brice KT. The Effect of Linkages on Science and Technology at Historically Black Colleges and Universities. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2006. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/pmap_diss/9


Georgia State University

3. Kim, Jungbu. Do Different Expenditure Mechanisms Invite Different Influences? Evidence from Research Expenditures of the National Institutes of Health.

Degree: PhD, Public Management and Policy, 2007, Georgia State University

This study examines 1) whether the different expenditure mechanisms used by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) invite different sources of influences on the budget process and thus on the expenditure outcomes and 2) whether the frequent use of omnibus appropriations bills since 1996 has changed budget levels of the institutes under the NIH. The NIH uses two major expenditure mechanisms with very different beneficiary groups: the principal investigator-initiated Research Project Grants and Intramural Research. Drawing on theories of motivations of public officials and of political clout of agency heads and considering empirical studies of the effect of omnibus legislation, this study reveals the following: 1) directors with more public service experience are more successful in securing a higher budget for their institutes; 2) while the directors are found to be driven by public service motivation, when it comes to expenditure allocation between two different mechanisms, they behave in a self-interested manner, representing the interests of the institutional sectors where they have developed close relationships; 3) with ever-increasing budgets between 1983 and 2005, the institute directors have chosen to seek higher budgets rather than merely avoid the risk of budget cuts; 4) although the advisory boards are purportedly used to seek private input for the priority setting, they tend to increase intramural more than external research project grant expenditures; 5) the practice of omnibus appropriations bills significantly benefits the institutes under the NIH such that with omnibus legislation the institutes' total expenditures have more than doubled controlling the other factors; and 6) there are significant differences in the effects of the director's public experience and the number of advisory boards and their membership both (i) between disease-focused institutes and nondisease institutes and (ii) with and without omnibus legislation. The effects of the director's public service experience and the advisory boards have more budgetary impact in the general science-focused institutes than in their disease-focused counterparts. The influence of the advisory board and of the institute director's public service experience on the individual institute's expenditure level is significantly diminished by the frequent use of omnibus appropriations bills. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Robert J. Eger, III - Chair, Dr. Gregory B. Lewis, Dr. John C. Thomas, Dr. Juan Rogers, Dr. Katherine G. Willoughby.

Subjects/Keywords: Expenditure mechanisms; R&D; Bureaucratic maximization; Omnibus legislation; Public service motivation; National Institutes of Health; Public Affairs, Public Policy and Public Administration

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kim, J. (2007). Do Different Expenditure Mechanisms Invite Different Influences? Evidence from Research Expenditures of the National Institutes of Health. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/pmap_diss/14

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kim, Jungbu. “Do Different Expenditure Mechanisms Invite Different Influences? Evidence from Research Expenditures of the National Institutes of Health.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed January 19, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/pmap_diss/14.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kim, Jungbu. “Do Different Expenditure Mechanisms Invite Different Influences? Evidence from Research Expenditures of the National Institutes of Health.” 2007. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Kim J. Do Different Expenditure Mechanisms Invite Different Influences? Evidence from Research Expenditures of the National Institutes of Health. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2007. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/pmap_diss/14.

Council of Science Editors:

Kim J. Do Different Expenditure Mechanisms Invite Different Influences? Evidence from Research Expenditures of the National Institutes of Health. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2007. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/pmap_diss/14

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