Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Georgia State University" +contributor:("Dr. Adia Harvey Wingfield"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. Macon, Kelley M. Bureaucratic Regulation and Emotional Labor: Implications for Social Services Case Management.

Degree: MA, Sociology, 2012, Georgia State University

Abstract This paper examines Family and Independence Case Managers in the social services in Atlanta, GA, as they negotiate a highly bureaucratized benefit delivery system that undervalues the emotional costs inherent in its operation. I begin with an examination of Weber’s (1946) theories of bureaucracy, as typified by three components of authority and control in the office. I proceed to Ritzer’s (2004) theory of “McDonaldization,” which advances Weber’s explication of ideal types of bureaucracy by highlighting four institutionalized dimensions of the corporate business model. Then, by incorporating Hochschild’s (1983) discussion of emotional labor, I include an analysis of the impact of emotional labor on workers’ experiences. I use a snowball sampling strategy, interviewing ten former colleagues. By employing the use of in-depth interviews, I attempt to provide an accurate depiction of the work-lives of these case managers and of the struggles they face in relation to their work and to themselves. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Deirdre Oakley, Dr. Griff Tester, Dr. Adia Harvey-Wingfield.

Subjects/Keywords: Bureaucracy; McDonaldization; Emotional Labor; Casework; Sociology

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Macon, K. M. (2012). Bureaucratic Regulation and Emotional Labor: Implications for Social Services Case Management. (Thesis). Georgia State University. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/sociology_theses/30

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Macon, Kelley M. “Bureaucratic Regulation and Emotional Labor: Implications for Social Services Case Management.” 2012. Thesis, Georgia State University. Accessed December 14, 2017. http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/sociology_theses/30.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Macon, Kelley M. “Bureaucratic Regulation and Emotional Labor: Implications for Social Services Case Management.” 2012. Web. 14 Dec 2017.

Vancouver:

Macon KM. Bureaucratic Regulation and Emotional Labor: Implications for Social Services Case Management. [Internet] [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2012. [cited 2017 Dec 14]. Available from: http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/sociology_theses/30.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Macon KM. Bureaucratic Regulation and Emotional Labor: Implications for Social Services Case Management. [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2012. Available from: http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/sociology_theses/30

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Georgia State University

2. Fawcett, Zoe. Dead Before Coed?: Perceptions of Women's Colleges in Male Dominated Society.

Degree: MA, Sociology, 2015, Georgia State University

The question of the necessity of women’s colleges has been posed by a variety of online news sources. Headlines reading, “Are Women’s Colleges Outdated?” and “Why Women’s Colleges Are Still Relevant” are sprinkled throughout the webpages of news conglomerates like Forbes, The Huffington Post, and Jezebel. I argue that the belief in a post-sexist society and the prevalence of hegemonic masculinity renders the necessity of women’s educational institutions invisible. Through an anti-racist feminist lens with a focus on the hegemonic practices of our patriarchal society, I shed light on how women’s colleges are currently positioned in the United States. I conducted a discourse analysis on 40 articles about U.S. women’s colleges in the corporate press from 1970 to 2015. Data analysis reveals that women’s colleges are depicted in the media as struggling for survival in our society, regardless of studies that document their strengths. They have faced and continue to face image issues, financial issues, and the reinforcement of heteronormativity throughout their history. These issues play a major role in how the media depicts them. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Wendy Simonds, Dr. Adia Harvey Wingfield, Dr. Anthony Hatch.

Subjects/Keywords: Women's colleges; Education; Hegemonic Masculinity

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fawcett, Z. (2015). Dead Before Coed?: Perceptions of Women's Colleges in Male Dominated Society. (Thesis). Georgia State University. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/sociology_theses/56

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fawcett, Zoe. “Dead Before Coed?: Perceptions of Women's Colleges in Male Dominated Society.” 2015. Thesis, Georgia State University. Accessed December 14, 2017. http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/sociology_theses/56.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fawcett, Zoe. “Dead Before Coed?: Perceptions of Women's Colleges in Male Dominated Society.” 2015. Web. 14 Dec 2017.

Vancouver:

Fawcett Z. Dead Before Coed?: Perceptions of Women's Colleges in Male Dominated Society. [Internet] [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2015. [cited 2017 Dec 14]. Available from: http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/sociology_theses/56.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Fawcett Z. Dead Before Coed?: Perceptions of Women's Colleges in Male Dominated Society. [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2015. Available from: http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/sociology_theses/56

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Georgia State University

3. Healy, Anthony E. Living Together: Conservative Protestants and Cohabitation.

Degree: MA, Sociology, 2010, Georgia State University

Recent research finds that conservative Protestants are cohabiting in no small numbers. Given the strict moral orientation of conservative Protestants, that outcome appears paradoxical. This thesis explains that paradox through the culture in action models of Swidler (1986), given the social and economic location of conservative Protestants. The thesis employs pooled General Social Survey data from 1993 to 2008 in which a question is asked that indicates cohabitation. The thesis finds that the social and economic location of conservative Protestants is related to their cohabiting. Though conservative Protestant cohabitors have lessened religiosity, much of the decline in religiosity compared to married conservative Protestants is due to the factors leading to cohabitation. But views and practices on premarital sex are the greatest factor in reducing that difference. The evidence in this thesis lends support to Swidler’s models of settled and unsettled lives in explaining cohabitation among conservative Protestants. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. James W. Ainsworth, Dr. Deidre A Oakley, Dr. Adia Harvey Wingfield.

Subjects/Keywords: Cohabitation; Religion; Culture; Conservative Protestants; Sociology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Healy, A. E. (2010). Living Together: Conservative Protestants and Cohabitation. (Thesis). Georgia State University. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/sociology_theses/27

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Healy, Anthony E. “Living Together: Conservative Protestants and Cohabitation.” 2010. Thesis, Georgia State University. Accessed December 14, 2017. http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/sociology_theses/27.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Healy, Anthony E. “Living Together: Conservative Protestants and Cohabitation.” 2010. Web. 14 Dec 2017.

Vancouver:

Healy AE. Living Together: Conservative Protestants and Cohabitation. [Internet] [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2010. [cited 2017 Dec 14]. Available from: http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/sociology_theses/27.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Healy AE. Living Together: Conservative Protestants and Cohabitation. [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2010. Available from: http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/sociology_theses/27

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.