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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia State University" +contributor:("Dora Il\'yasova, PhD"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Georgia State University

1. Kloc, Noreen. Insulin Dynamic Measures and Weight Change.

Degree: MPH, Public Health, 2016, Georgia State University

ABSTRACT Insulin Dynamic Measures and Weight Change By Noreen Kloc B.S. Computer Information Technology, Purdue University December 7, 2015 INTRODUCTION: Weight gain and obesity are risk factors for insulin resistance that can lead to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease; however, there is a complicated interplay between insulin sensitivity (SI), fasting insulin, acute insulin response (AIR), and disposition index (DI) and the relationship of these dynamic measures with weight change is not well understood. AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between insulin dynamic measures, SI, fasting insulin, AIR, and DI, with weight change during a 5-years follow-up period in the multi-ethnic cohort of the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study (IRAS). METHODS: Data on 879 men and women of Hispanic, non-Hispanic White, and African-American race/ethnicity aged 40-69 years were obtained at baseline (1992-1994) and at 5 year follow-up. Crude associations between the insulin dynamic measures and weight change were evaluated using Kruskal-Wallis test and the relationships between log-transformed insulin-related variables were examined using Spearman rank-order analysis. Multivariate regression models evaluated associations of interest adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, and diabetes status in a time-dependent manner using mixed models. RESULTS: Insulin sensitivity SI inversely coevolves with weight, i.e. greater weight is predicted by lower SI at any time point. To answer the question whether SI is the cause or a consequence of weight change, we examined the associations with the baseline values and a change in SI. In this model, both the baseline SI and change in SI were inversely correlated with weight gain. A similar approach showed that baseline values and change in fasting insulin were directly associated with weight gain. Weight change over time was associated with AIR, i.e. increases in AIR and greater AIR at baseline predicted weight gain. We did not find strong relationships between DI and weight change. DISCUSSION: These results suggest that insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion can modulate weight in a non-diabetic population. Advisors/Committee Members: Dora Il'yasova, PhD, Ruiyan Luo, PhD.

Subjects/Keywords: insulin resistance; insulin sensitivity; insulin secretion; weight; metabolic syndrome; diabetes

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kloc, N. (2016). Insulin Dynamic Measures and Weight Change. (Thesis). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/iph_theses/437

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kloc, Noreen. “Insulin Dynamic Measures and Weight Change.” 2016. Thesis, Georgia State University. Accessed October 17, 2019. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/iph_theses/437.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kloc, Noreen. “Insulin Dynamic Measures and Weight Change.” 2016. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Kloc N. Insulin Dynamic Measures and Weight Change. [Internet] [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/iph_theses/437.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kloc N. Insulin Dynamic Measures and Weight Change. [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2016. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/iph_theses/437

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Georgia State University

2. Pattabiraman, Vaishnavi. Multivariate Examination Of Risk Factors Associated With Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection In The United States Using National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey From 2003 to 2014.

Degree: MPH, Public Health, 2017, Georgia State University

Introduction: Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection is the most common blood-borne infection in the world with a global prevalence of ~3%. It also represents an underestimated and under-recognized viral infection because it is asymptomatic during the initial period of infection, which tends to span several decades. However, after establishing itself as a chronic state, HCV infection often leads to severe debilitating liver conditions such as cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma to name a few resulting in poor quality of life, increased healthcare costs and mortality. Several earlier studies have examined risk factors associated with HCV. However, a comprehensive study that has simultaneously evaluated a wide range of addictive risk behaviors associated with HCV has not been conducted to date. This type of investigation will help to identify at-risk populations for HCV and provide valuable information regarding how one might efficiently link them to appropriate treatment and care. Aim: The primary aims of this study were 1). To estimate chronic HCV infection (CHI) prevalence in non-institutionalized U.S. adult population from 2003-2014 2). To perform a multivariate examination of all known behavioral risk factors significantly associated with CHI and 3). To identify less invasive questions regarding risk behaviors associated with CHI that could be used to predict state-level CHI prevalence using other state-specific data sources such as The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Methods: The study utilized nationally representative data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) for the years 2003-2014. HCV RNA positive persons were CHI positive population. Bivariate analyses were performed to examine the frequency distributions of the study’s primary dependent variable (CHI) and all independent variables (demographical + behavioral risk factor variables). The analysis sample included 11,596 adults aged 20-59 years. Risk factors for CHI were examined using both bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. We first conducted weighted bivariate logistic regression analyses to examine the relationships of dependent and independent variables without controlling for potential confounders. We then conducted weighted multivariate adjusted logistic regression analyses to examine the relationships between the dependent and independent variables while controlling for potential confounders. Odds ratios (OR), 95% confidence limits (CL) and p-values were calculated. A p-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. SAS 9.4 was used for all statistical analyses. Results: The estimated number of CHI adults aged >/= 20 years in 2014 was 1.93 million leading to an estimated CHI prevalence of 0.7%. Injection drug users (IDU) had the highest CHI prevalence of 30.24% by bivariate analyses. Multivariate logistic regression analysis in the chronic HCV full… Advisors/Committee Members: Dora Il'yasova, PhD, William Thompson, PhD.

Subjects/Keywords: Hepatitis C Virus; Chronic Hepatitis C virus prevalence; Risk Factors for HCV; complex risk factors associated with chronic HCV; multivariate examination of risk factors for chronic HCV; NHANES datasets for HCV; complex risk factors examination for chronic HCV in the United States of America

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pattabiraman, V. (2017). Multivariate Examination Of Risk Factors Associated With Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection In The United States Using National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey From 2003 to 2014. (Thesis). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/iph_theses/561

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pattabiraman, Vaishnavi. “Multivariate Examination Of Risk Factors Associated With Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection In The United States Using National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey From 2003 to 2014.” 2017. Thesis, Georgia State University. Accessed October 17, 2019. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/iph_theses/561.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pattabiraman, Vaishnavi. “Multivariate Examination Of Risk Factors Associated With Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection In The United States Using National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey From 2003 to 2014.” 2017. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Pattabiraman V. Multivariate Examination Of Risk Factors Associated With Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection In The United States Using National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey From 2003 to 2014. [Internet] [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/iph_theses/561.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Pattabiraman V. Multivariate Examination Of Risk Factors Associated With Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection In The United States Using National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey From 2003 to 2014. [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2017. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/iph_theses/561

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Melton, Charles. Oxidative Status and Hypertension: An Examination of the Prospective Association Between Urinary F2-isoprostanes and Hypertension.

Degree: MPH, Public Health, 2015, Georgia State University

Background: Hypertension is a pathological increase in blood pressure that affects nearly 30% of the U.S. population and is a primary modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Despite advancements in prevention and treatment, hypertension is still one of the most common conditions around the world, and for a majority of cases the causal mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. A growing body of literature suggests that oxidative stress status may play an etiological role in many chronic conditions, including hypertension. Specifically, a systemic overabundance of reactive oxygen species may give rise to endothelial dysfunction, increased sodium and H2O retention, and alterations in sympathetic outflow, leading to an increase in blood pressure. Purpose: The main objective of this study is to investigate the prospective association between F2-isoprostanes, a validated biomarker of oxidative status, and development of hypertension in a large, multi-centered, multi-ethnic cohort of adults aged 40-69 at baseline. Methods: This is a secondary data analysis that utilized previously collected data from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study. 844 participants were included in the analysis. Briefly, four urinary F2-isoprostane isomers (F2-IsoP1, F2-IsoP2, F2-IsoP3, and F2-IsoP4) were quantified using liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry and adjusted for urinary creatinine levels. Hypertension was assessed at baseline and follow-up visits and defined as systolic blood pressure > 140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure > 90 mm Hg and/or currently taking antihypertensive medications. Crude associations between study population characteristics and hypertensive status were analyzed with the chi-square and Wilcoxon-rank sum tests. Crude associations between study population characteristics and F2-isoprostane levels were analyzed with Wilcoxon-rank sum, Kruskal-Wallis, and Spearman’s rank correlation measures. Finally, the adjusted prospective associations between hypertensive status and F2-isoprostane concentrations were modeled using logistic regression. Results: Of the 844 participants who were included in the study, 258 (31%) were classified as hypertensive at baseline. Among the 586 participants who were normotensive at baseline, 123 (21%) developed hypertension over the five-year study period. Importantly, none of four F2-isoprostane isomers predicted a significant increase in the odds of developing hypertension, as indicated by their odds ratio 95% confidence intervals; F2-IsoP1: (0.85, 1.31), F2-IsoP2: (0.62, 1.13), F2-IsoP3: (0.80, 1.27), and F2-IsoP4: (0.84, 1.29). Conclusion: Previous studies have investigated the association between oxidative status and hypertension prevalence, however the cross sectional nature of the… Advisors/Committee Members: Dora Il'yasova, PhD, Ruiyan Luo, PhD.

Subjects/Keywords: hypertension; oxidative stress; reactive oxygen species; biomarkers

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Melton, C. (2015). Oxidative Status and Hypertension: An Examination of the Prospective Association Between Urinary F2-isoprostanes and Hypertension. (Thesis). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/iph_theses/374

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Melton, Charles. “Oxidative Status and Hypertension: An Examination of the Prospective Association Between Urinary F2-isoprostanes and Hypertension.” 2015. Thesis, Georgia State University. Accessed October 17, 2019. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/iph_theses/374.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Melton, Charles. “Oxidative Status and Hypertension: An Examination of the Prospective Association Between Urinary F2-isoprostanes and Hypertension.” 2015. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Melton C. Oxidative Status and Hypertension: An Examination of the Prospective Association Between Urinary F2-isoprostanes and Hypertension. [Internet] [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/iph_theses/374.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Melton C. Oxidative Status and Hypertension: An Examination of the Prospective Association Between Urinary F2-isoprostanes and Hypertension. [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2015. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/iph_theses/374

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.