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You searched for +publisher:"George Mason University" +contributor:("Maibach, Edward W"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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George Mason University

1. Stenhouse, Neil. Powerful Feelings: Extending the Extended Parallel Processing Model to collective action on climate change .

Degree: 2015, George Mason University

The extended parallel processing model (EPPM) is a theory of how individuals’ perceptions of a threat, combined with their perceptions of their own ability to effectively remove the threat, influence their behavioral response (Witte, 1992). Two scholars (Hart & Feldman, 2014) have suggested extending the EPPM to explain responses to the collective threat of climate change. This extension consists of the addition of two efficacy perceptions into the model: perceived likelihood of political action influencing politicians’ actions, and perceived effectiveness of policy in reducing the threat of climate change. In this dissertation, I use survey and experimental data to extend Hart & Feldman’s work by examining two additional forms of efficacy perceptions  – participative efficacy and expectations of others’ participation. I also control for a third construct, collective identification with climate advocates. I hypothesized that each of the efficacy beliefs, and perceived threat, would be independently and positively associated with collective action. My results showed that four of the five forms of efficacy beliefs, perceived threat, and collective identification with climate advocates, were each positively associated with at least one measure of political action. Expectation that others would participate in political action was not associated with taking action.. The constructs with the strongest associations with political action were perceived efficacy of government climate policy, and collective identification. The failure of most experimental messages to have significant effects on efficacy and threat perceptions, combined with problems in the way that several variables were measured, mean that strong conclusions about the causal effects of each variable cannot be made. These results do, however, suggest that models of collective action will be strengthened by including a more diverse range of efficacy beliefs. Other implications for theory and practice are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Maibach, Edward W (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Communication; Political science; Climate change; Climate change; Collective action; Efficacy; Extended Parallel Process Model

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stenhouse, N. (2015). Powerful Feelings: Extending the Extended Parallel Processing Model to collective action on climate change . (Thesis). George Mason University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1920/9851

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stenhouse, Neil. “Powerful Feelings: Extending the Extended Parallel Processing Model to collective action on climate change .” 2015. Thesis, George Mason University. Accessed November 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1920/9851.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stenhouse, Neil. “Powerful Feelings: Extending the Extended Parallel Processing Model to collective action on climate change .” 2015. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Stenhouse N. Powerful Feelings: Extending the Extended Parallel Processing Model to collective action on climate change . [Internet] [Thesis]. George Mason University; 2015. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1920/9851.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Stenhouse N. Powerful Feelings: Extending the Extended Parallel Processing Model to collective action on climate change . [Thesis]. George Mason University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1920/9851

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


George Mason University

2. Thaker, Jagadish. Climate Change in the Indian Mind: Role of Collective Efficacy in Climate Change Adaptation .

Degree: 2012, George Mason University

Successful climate change adaptation requires behavioral and policy changes at the individual, community, and national levels. Although most research on adaptive capacity focuses on the role of the economy and technology, an increasing body of research suggests that socially shared beliefs, norms, and networks are also critical in increasing individuals’ and communities’ adaptive capacity. Based on Bandura’s social cognitive theory, this dissertation examined the role of collective efficacy—people’s shared beliefs about their group’s capabilities to accomplish collective tasks—in influencing Indians’ adaptive capacity to deal with drinking water supply scarcity, a condition likely to be exacerbated in the future by climate change. The hypotheses were individual-level collective efficacy perceptions will be positively associated with (1) behavioral involvement in adaptation, and (2) support for adaptation policy, and (3) communityx level collective efficacy perceptions will be positively associated with community adaptation measures. To test these hypotheses, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 4031 randomly selected Indian respondents using a stratified random national sampling plan during December 2011 and January 2012, resulting in a response rate of 39.7%. To test these hypothesis, correlational analysis, and hierarchical regression models was used. Partial support for the first hypothesis was found: individuals’ with robust collective efficacy beliefs are more likely to be involved in community activities, although the relationship is not linear. The second hypothesis was fully supported: individuals with high levels of collective efficacy beliefs are more likely to support government adaptation policies. The third hypothesis was also fully supported: communities with high collective efficacy are more likely to implement adaptation measures. These results demonstrate that collective efficacy beliefs are positively associated with individuals’ and communities’ capacity to successfully adapt to climate change. Taking steps to increase the collective efficacy beliefs of community members—for example, through mass media campaigns—may bolster the adaptive capacity of communities to climate change; this important possibility should be tested in future research. Advisors/Committee Members: Maibach, Edward W (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Collective Efficacy; Climate Change Adaptation; Community Engagement; Behaviorial Involvement; Policy Support; Community Adaptation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Thaker, J. (2012). Climate Change in the Indian Mind: Role of Collective Efficacy in Climate Change Adaptation . (Thesis). George Mason University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1920/7882

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Thaker, Jagadish. “Climate Change in the Indian Mind: Role of Collective Efficacy in Climate Change Adaptation .” 2012. Thesis, George Mason University. Accessed November 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1920/7882.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Thaker, Jagadish. “Climate Change in the Indian Mind: Role of Collective Efficacy in Climate Change Adaptation .” 2012. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Thaker J. Climate Change in the Indian Mind: Role of Collective Efficacy in Climate Change Adaptation . [Internet] [Thesis]. George Mason University; 2012. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1920/7882.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Thaker J. Climate Change in the Indian Mind: Role of Collective Efficacy in Climate Change Adaptation . [Thesis]. George Mason University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1920/7882

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


George Mason University

3. Kotcher, John. Reducing Resistance to Communication about Climate Change Using an Applied Self-affirmation Intervention .

Degree: 2016, George Mason University

Self-affirmation is a psychological process in which individuals draw upon important aspects of their self-concept to maintain a positive evaluation of themselves. Previous work has found that self-affirmation can reduce biased processing of information that conflicts with individuals’ prior beliefs or political ideology. However, little research has examined the effect of self-affirmation in the domain of climate change communication. Advisors/Committee Members: Maibach, Edward W (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Communication; climate change communication; environmental communication; message effects; risk communication; science communication; self affirmation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kotcher, J. (2016). Reducing Resistance to Communication about Climate Change Using an Applied Self-affirmation Intervention . (Thesis). George Mason University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1920/10545

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kotcher, John. “Reducing Resistance to Communication about Climate Change Using an Applied Self-affirmation Intervention .” 2016. Thesis, George Mason University. Accessed November 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1920/10545.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kotcher, John. “Reducing Resistance to Communication about Climate Change Using an Applied Self-affirmation Intervention .” 2016. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Kotcher J. Reducing Resistance to Communication about Climate Change Using an Applied Self-affirmation Intervention . [Internet] [Thesis]. George Mason University; 2016. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1920/10545.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kotcher J. Reducing Resistance to Communication about Climate Change Using an Applied Self-affirmation Intervention . [Thesis]. George Mason University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1920/10545

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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