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You searched for +publisher:"George Mason University" +contributor:("Chang, Kuo-Chu"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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George Mason University

1. Martin, Todd William. Probabilistic Reasoning for Dynamic Spectrum Access .

Degree: 2016, George Mason University

Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA) systems combine situational awareness development, decision assessment, and spectrum adaptation to provide greater spectrum access to wireless systems. While significant progress has been made in system dynamics and policy conformance reasoning, concern still exists regarding a DSA system’s ability to reliably determine the operating conditions for policy compliance in situ. Current methods in literature and recent FCC policies generally develop global operating constraints based on a priori modeling and analysis, which potentially reduces DSA system performance in all cases in order to mitigate risks that occur only in a few cases. Furthermore, the a priori determination of in situ operating constraints is inconsistent with the premise of a ``smart'' or ``cognitive'' wireless system. Advisors/Committee Members: Chang, Kuo-Chu (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Engineering; Systems science; Computer science; Bayesian Networks; Dynamic Spectrum Access; Probabilistic Reasoning; Wireless Communications

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Martin, T. W. (2016). Probabilistic Reasoning for Dynamic Spectrum Access . (Thesis). George Mason University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1920/10630

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Martin, Todd William. “Probabilistic Reasoning for Dynamic Spectrum Access .” 2016. Thesis, George Mason University. Accessed July 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1920/10630.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Martin, Todd William. “Probabilistic Reasoning for Dynamic Spectrum Access .” 2016. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Martin TW. Probabilistic Reasoning for Dynamic Spectrum Access . [Internet] [Thesis]. George Mason University; 2016. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1920/10630.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Martin TW. Probabilistic Reasoning for Dynamic Spectrum Access . [Thesis]. George Mason University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1920/10630

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


George Mason University

2. Clemons, Thomas III. Improved Space Target Tracking Through Bias Estimation From In-situ Celestial Observations .

Degree: 2010, George Mason University

This dissertation provides a new methodology of using star observations and advanced nonlinear estimation algorithms to improve the ability of a space based Infrared tracking system to track cold body targets in space. Typically, the tracking system consists of two satellites flying in a lead-follower formation tracking a ballistic or space target. Each satellite is equipped with a narrow-view IR sensor that provides azimuth and elevation measurements to the target. The tracking problem is made more difficult due to a constant, non-varying or slowly varying bias error present in each sensor‟s line of sight measurements. The conventional sensor calibration process occurs prior to the start of the tracking process and does not account for subsequent changes in the sensor bias. This dissertation develops a technique to estimate the sensor bias from celestial observations while simultaneously tracking the target. As stars are detected during the target tracking process the instantaneous sensor pointing error can be calculated as the difference between a measurement of the celestial observation and the known position of the star. The system then utilizes a separate bias filter to estimate the bias value based on these measurements and correct the target line of sight measurements. The study develops and compares the ability of three advanced nonlinear state estimators: A Linearized Kalman Filter; an Extended Kalman Filter; and an Unscented Kalman Filter, to update the state vector. The bias correction-state estimation algorithm is validated using a number of scenarios that were created using The Satellite Toolkit©. The variance of the target position error resulting from the nonlinear estimation filters is compared to the posterior Cramer-Rao lower bound and a filter consistency check. The results of this research provide a potential solution to sensor calibration while simultaneously tracking a space borne target with a space based sensor system. Advisors/Committee Members: Chang, Kuo-Chu (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: calibration; estimation; kalman filtering; missile detection; missile tracking; bias correc tion; space tracking

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Clemons, T. I. (2010). Improved Space Target Tracking Through Bias Estimation From In-situ Celestial Observations . (Thesis). George Mason University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1920/5819

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Clemons, Thomas III. “Improved Space Target Tracking Through Bias Estimation From In-situ Celestial Observations .” 2010. Thesis, George Mason University. Accessed July 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1920/5819.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Clemons, Thomas III. “Improved Space Target Tracking Through Bias Estimation From In-situ Celestial Observations .” 2010. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Clemons TI. Improved Space Target Tracking Through Bias Estimation From In-situ Celestial Observations . [Internet] [Thesis]. George Mason University; 2010. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1920/5819.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Clemons TI. Improved Space Target Tracking Through Bias Estimation From In-situ Celestial Observations . [Thesis]. George Mason University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1920/5819

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


George Mason University

3. Tzeng, Sean. Management Towards Success - Defense Business System Acquisition Probability of Success Model .

Degree: 2015, George Mason University

The great amounts of data and the large number of artifacts generated during the execution of defense acquisition programs serve as evidence of program progress and decision support. However, acquisition decision makers have limited means to determine what all the evidence items collectively indicate and how they can be used to support decision making in a way that ensures program success. The Defense Business System Acquisition Probability of Success (DAPS) model is an evidence-based analytical tool developed to help decision makers analyze and understand the implications of the abundance of evidence produced during a Defense Business System (DBS) acquisition. Based on observations and inferences from evidence, the DAPS can assess program performance in specific subject matter areas (Knowledge Areas) and ascertain the overall likelihood for program success through technical reviews and milestone reviews (Knowledge Checkpoints). DAPS supports acquisition decision making and is an initial step forward in improving human understanding and ability to innovate and engineer systems through evidential reasoning. Advisors/Committee Members: Chang, Kuo-Chu (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: System science; Industrial engineering; Management; Bayesian Inference; Decision Analysis; Defense Acquisition; Evidential Reasoning; Project Management; Systems Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tzeng, S. (2015). Management Towards Success - Defense Business System Acquisition Probability of Success Model . (Thesis). George Mason University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1920/9692

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tzeng, Sean. “Management Towards Success - Defense Business System Acquisition Probability of Success Model .” 2015. Thesis, George Mason University. Accessed July 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1920/9692.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tzeng, Sean. “Management Towards Success - Defense Business System Acquisition Probability of Success Model .” 2015. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Tzeng S. Management Towards Success - Defense Business System Acquisition Probability of Success Model . [Internet] [Thesis]. George Mason University; 2015. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1920/9692.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Tzeng S. Management Towards Success - Defense Business System Acquisition Probability of Success Model . [Thesis]. George Mason University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1920/9692

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.