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You searched for +publisher:"Florida State University" +contributor:("Trevor S. Luke"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Florida State University

1. Roark, Kyle A. A Crisis of Wisdom: The Early Enoch Apocalypses and the Cultural Politics of Knowledge in the Hellenistic Age.

Degree: PhD, Religion, 2018, Florida State University

This dissertation examines early Enochic literature, namely the Astronomical Book and the Book of the Watchers, in the context of traditions concerning Greco-Roman culture heroes and the debates about the origins of civilization during the Hellenistic age. I argue that the emphasis on the spread of antediluvian knowledge in both these works should be understood as a Jewish response to debates about the origins of cultural knowledge essential to Hellenistic civilization, especially astronomy and metallurgy. Chapter one surveys recent scholarship on the Astronomical Book and Watchers. Recent interpretations of Watchers have read the violence in the text as part of a program of resistance to Greek imperial hegemony, while similar readings for the Astronomical Book have not gained much support. While the resistance reading is a leading model for understanding early Enochic literature, there is an important dimension that has not been extensively explored for interpreting this body of literature, namely the debates surrounding the origins of cultural knowledge during the Hellenistic age. There was a robust discourse in the Hellenistic age about the origins of civilization and types of knowledge, such as astronomy and writing, that were widespread throughout the known world. On the one hand, Greek authors, including Herodotus and Diodorus, give evidence that some Greeks were seeking the origins of civilization in the cultures conquered by Alexander. On the other hand, native writers felt a nostalgia for the past and a time when their respective culture‚Äôs held greater power and prestige, causing them to focus on the greatness of their community earlier in history. Thus, in light of both these circumstances there developed a competition among native communities to appear to be the oldest culture and the source of popular knowledge essential for Hellenistic civilization. Chapter three turns to the early Enochic literature by examining the importance of astronomy and writing in both the Astronomical Book and Watchers. Both of these texts emphasize that legitimate knowledge of the heavens was given to the Jewish antediluvian figure of Enoch and that this knowledge was written down by Enoch. I argue that the choice of Enoch is meant to place the origins of astronomy, which was increasingly seen as a byword for antiquity generally, in a Jewish figure. In turn, a written tradition connected to this astronomical data would imply that all Hellenistic understanding about the movements of the heavenly bodies is because of the Jewish people and their preservation of this written knowledge down through the centuries. In addition, Watchers claims that an illegitimate form of astronomical knowledge was given to humanity by the fallen watchers. I argue that the depiction of the watchers is meant to parody accounts of antediluvian culture heroes in other traditions, most especially the Babylonians. Chapter four explores the role of violence in Watchers, and its connection to the origins of metallurgy in making weapons. I argue that the text… Advisors/Committee Members: Matthew J. Goff (professor directing dissertation), Trevor S. Luke (university representative), David B Levenson (committee member), Nicole Kelley (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Bible; Study and teaching

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Roark, K. A. (2018). A Crisis of Wisdom: The Early Enoch Apocalypses and the Cultural Politics of Knowledge in the Hellenistic Age. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida State University. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/2018_Sp_Roark_fsu_0071E_14487 ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Roark, Kyle A. “A Crisis of Wisdom: The Early Enoch Apocalypses and the Cultural Politics of Knowledge in the Hellenistic Age.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida State University. Accessed July 09, 2020. http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/2018_Sp_Roark_fsu_0071E_14487 ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Roark, Kyle A. “A Crisis of Wisdom: The Early Enoch Apocalypses and the Cultural Politics of Knowledge in the Hellenistic Age.” 2018. Web. 09 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Roark KA. A Crisis of Wisdom: The Early Enoch Apocalypses and the Cultural Politics of Knowledge in the Hellenistic Age. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida State University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jul 09]. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/2018_Sp_Roark_fsu_0071E_14487 ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Roark KA. A Crisis of Wisdom: The Early Enoch Apocalypses and the Cultural Politics of Knowledge in the Hellenistic Age. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida State University; 2018. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/2018_Sp_Roark_fsu_0071E_14487 ;


Florida State University

2. Blythe, Christopher James. Vernacular Mormonism: The Development of Latter-Day Saint Apocalyptic (1830-1930).

Degree: PhD, Religion, 2015, Florida State University

This study examines the development of apocalypticism in Mormon culture from the nineteenth century to the early twentieth century. Specifically, it argues that a major shift in apocalyptic thought in the twentieth century was essential for the Americanization of Mormons during the period of transition (1890-1930). The early Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints possessed a radical eschatology, emphasizing dualism and the imminence of the apocalypse. Following the murder of their prophet, Joseph Smith, Mormons came to see themselves as a distinctive people from other Euro-Americans, which they referred to as Gentiles. They expected the soon collapse of the American government as a result of their culpability in Smith's death, as well as other examples of persecution. Throughout the nineteenth century, the relationship between Mormonism and their fellow Americans was defined by this millenarian logic. It was only after Utah was received as a state in the Union that Mormons began to embrace a more moderate millenarian thought. In addition to historicizing the subject of apocalypticism in Mormonism, this study examines how the regulation of apocalyptic prophecy ultimately resulted in a new understanding of how lay Mormons should properly experience and narrate the experience of their faith. Throughout the nineteenth century, it was popular for Mormons to narrate visions, dreams, and prophecies, often including narratives of the apocalypse. During the period of transition, the Church hierarchy did not directly refute previous understandings of millenarian thought. Instead, they opposed popular vernacular prophecies, which continued to promote a nineteenth-century Mormon worldview. By regulating these prophecies and marginalizing those who shared them, Church leaders articulated new rules for the sharing of charismata.

A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Religion in partial fulfillment of the Doctor of Philosophy.

Spring Semester, 2015.

December 5, 2014.

Eschatology, Mormonism, Vernacular Religion

John Corrigan, Professor Directing Dissertation; Trevor Luke, University Representative; Amanda Porterfield, Committee Member; Michael McVicar, Committee Member.

Advisors/Committee Members: John Corrigan (professor directing dissertation), Trevor S. Luke (university representative), Amanda Porterfield (committee member), Michael J. McVicar (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Religions; History; History; Study and teaching

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Blythe, C. J. (2015). Vernacular Mormonism: The Development of Latter-Day Saint Apocalyptic (1830-1930). (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida State University. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-9294 ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Blythe, Christopher James. “Vernacular Mormonism: The Development of Latter-Day Saint Apocalyptic (1830-1930).” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida State University. Accessed July 09, 2020. http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-9294 ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Blythe, Christopher James. “Vernacular Mormonism: The Development of Latter-Day Saint Apocalyptic (1830-1930).” 2015. Web. 09 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Blythe CJ. Vernacular Mormonism: The Development of Latter-Day Saint Apocalyptic (1830-1930). [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida State University; 2015. [cited 2020 Jul 09]. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-9294 ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Blythe CJ. Vernacular Mormonism: The Development of Latter-Day Saint Apocalyptic (1830-1930). [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida State University; 2015. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-9294 ;

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