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You searched for +publisher:"Florida State University" +contributor:("Stuart Baker"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Florida State University

1. Aronson, Donna Beth. Access and Equity: Performing Diversity at the New World Theatre.

Degree: PhD, Theatre, 2004, Florida State University

This dissertation examines the background, production history, and outreach projects of the New WORLD Theater (NWT) in terms of the NWT's usefulness as a model for diversifying theatre programs and, more importantly, for utilizing the work of theatre programs to address issues of access and equity in higher education for at-risk and students of color. Determining how theatre might be used as a tool to encourage young people to participate in society and eventually matriculate to higher education is integral to the motivation behind this study. The researcher's extensive experience in both theatre and higher education, and awareness of equity and access issues among both students and faculty informs the goals for this study as well. Chapter two's literature review concentrates on research related to diversity, access, and equity. Additionally, the review covers critical educational theory and its relation to theatre and praxis. The production history and background presented in Chapter Three provides the context through which the NWT outreach projects were developed. Chapter Four describes the outreach projects of the NWT, beginning with the Latino Theatre Project and the Asian Theatre Project, two projects that set the stage for the Looking In/To the Future project. Chapter four also provides a detailed description of the Looking In/To the Future/Project 2050, as well as an in-depth account of the activities of and changes to the outreach program over a three-year period. Finally, Chapter Five considers the applicability of the NWT's outreach projects to the national issue of student and faculty recruitment and retention, and the usefulness of the NWT as a model for expanding diversity in theatre programs at institutions of higher education. This study finds that the NWT's Looking In/To The Future/Project 2050 is consistent with current national issues related to diversity, access, and equity in higher education institutions. By bringing together marginalized artists and scholars of color, the NWT has provided a site for continued discourse. The work of the project seeks to politicize the discourse of at-risk and youth of color, and, as such, is situated in the politics of performance.

A Dissertation submitted to the School of Theatre in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.

Degree Awarded: Summer Semester, 2004.

Date of Defense: December 8, 2003.

Production history

Jean Graham-Jones, Professor Directing Dissertation; Donna Nudd, Outside Committee Member; Stuart Baker, Committee Member; Carrie Sandahl, Committee Member.

Advisors/Committee Members: Jean Graham-Jones (professor directing dissertation), Donna Nudd (outside committee member), Stuart Baker (committee member), Carrie Sandahl (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Theater

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Aronson, D. B. (2004). Access and Equity: Performing Diversity at the New World Theatre. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida State University. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-0033 ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Aronson, Donna Beth. “Access and Equity: Performing Diversity at the New World Theatre.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida State University. Accessed November 17, 2019. http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-0033 ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Aronson, Donna Beth. “Access and Equity: Performing Diversity at the New World Theatre.” 2004. Web. 17 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Aronson DB. Access and Equity: Performing Diversity at the New World Theatre. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida State University; 2004. [cited 2019 Nov 17]. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-0033 ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Aronson DB. Access and Equity: Performing Diversity at the New World Theatre. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida State University; 2004. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-0033 ;


Florida State University

2. Herer, Lisbeth Diane. Tropes of Otherness: Abjection, Sublimity and Jewish Subjectivity in Enlightenment England.

Degree: PhD, 2004, Florida State University

My dissertation examines Jewish cultural subjectivity and English cultural subjectivity through a reading of Richard Cumberland's 1794 play The Jew and Matthew Lewis' 1794 novel The Monk. I use two perspectives from the eighteenth century, the aesthetic discourse of the sublime and the Enlightenment discourses of benevolence and tolerance. I also make use of two twentieth-century perspectives, the contemporary reformulation of the aesthetic discourse of the sublime and the psychoanalytic concept of abjection. These theoretical perspectives apply to key issues of otherness and excessiveness that characterize representations of Jews and the performance of Jewishness in these late eighteenth-century texts. Richard Cumberland's The Jew (1794) overtly upholds the Enlightenment ideas of toleration and benevolence and attributes these characteristics to the Jewish character of Sheva, but it also paradoxically figures Sheva as alterity or the Other within, essential components to the concept of abjection. Matthew Lewis' The Monk (1794) overtly addresses itself to the eighteenth-century aesthetic discourse of the sublime and signals its connection to Edmund Burke's 1757 seminal work on the sublime. Yet, this text as well shares an affinity with evidence of the contemporary reformulation of the eighteenth-century concept of the sublime. Some contemporary theorists see the sublime as an unincorporable "remainder" of the experience of encountering an "other" in society, one who cannot be appropriated or included within any known discursive network. The figure of The Wandering Jew in The Monk could be seen as a "remainder" or excess. Both texts locate the Jewish characters inside and outside the definition and control of English cultural subjectivity. A certain literary violence takes place in these texts when erecting differences between Jewish cultural subjectivity and English cultural subjectivity, clouding the hegemonic constructions of both Jewish and English cultural subjectivity. These texts at once differentiate and conflate Jewish and English cultural subjectivity because of the overly determined nature of subjectivity generally and the instability of English national identity specifically in late eighteenth-century England. Sheva the Jewish moneylender embodies the abject's "alterity" as otherness, as the possibility of inhabited impossibility. Sheva is possibly an English cultural subject as well as Jewish cultural subject. Further, the figuration of the Jew as a wasted body, in the character of Sheva, refigures the classic picture of the Jewish body as an (over)consuming one, a "consumer" of too much food, too much money, too much space in a mercantile culture wanting to assert itself by dominating uncontrollable elements and relegating Jews to another place in the culture. The Wandering Jew figure embodies the sublime's formulation of excess, a surplus that is at once aligned with the natural world and the unnatural world. This theoretical space is occupied by the Jewish cultural subject, the incommensurable space of… Advisors/Committee Members: Linda Saladin-Adams (professor directing dissertation), Stuart Baker (outside committee member), Karen Laughlin (committee member), Helen Burke (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Arts; Humanities

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Herer, L. D. (2004). Tropes of Otherness: Abjection, Sublimity and Jewish Subjectivity in Enlightenment England. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida State University. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-4093 ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Herer, Lisbeth Diane. “Tropes of Otherness: Abjection, Sublimity and Jewish Subjectivity in Enlightenment England.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida State University. Accessed November 17, 2019. http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-4093 ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Herer, Lisbeth Diane. “Tropes of Otherness: Abjection, Sublimity and Jewish Subjectivity in Enlightenment England.” 2004. Web. 17 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Herer LD. Tropes of Otherness: Abjection, Sublimity and Jewish Subjectivity in Enlightenment England. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida State University; 2004. [cited 2019 Nov 17]. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-4093 ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Herer LD. Tropes of Otherness: Abjection, Sublimity and Jewish Subjectivity in Enlightenment England. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida State University; 2004. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-4093 ;


Florida State University

3. Jones, Debra Calhoun. Jo Carson's Contribution to the Swamp Gravy Recipe.

Degree: PhD, English, 2006, Florida State University

Swamp Gravy, an oral history/community performance project in Colquitt, Georgia, has been named Georgia's "Official Folk Life Play," received critical acclaim, earned grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, Georgia Arts Council, the Woodruff Foundation, among others. This dissertation, Jo Carson's Contribution to the Swamp Gravy Recipe, introduces the project, examines the elements found in its plays, and discusses the writing of Jo Carson as an important component. She shapes disparate stories into unified scripts, using folk life details and a feminist perspective. Her writing results in folk life plays and southern drama, accommodates large amateur casts and insures the success of the community performance project. The first chapter looks at Carson's writing before Swamp Gravy to identify characteristic elements of her work. Her poetry, children's books, short stories, and plays share oral history and folk life elements, which lend verisimilitude. Her first published work, a volume of poems, resonates with the stories and speech of ordinary people while Carson fills her children's books and short story collection with colloquialisms of southern speech and folk life details to create a sense of place. In her earlier plays, she adds strains of southern drama and liberal feminism and establishes structural, thematic origins for the Swamp Gravy plays. The next four chapters discuss how oral history, folk life, southern drama, and liberal feminism elements from earlier works inform the Swamp Gravy plays. Chapter Six presents Dr. Richard Owen Geer's community performance model and the restrictions it places on Carson's writing. The conclusion looks at the continuation of the Swamp Gravy phenomenon in Colquitt, evaluates its impact on other communities, and tracks Carson's work after Swamp Gravy. This dissertation hopes to promote an academic awareness of Jo Carson as a playwright and to establish Swamp Gravy as an influential community performance project.

A Dissertation submitted to the Department of English in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.

Summer Semester, 2006.

April 26, 2006.

Community Performance, Swamp Gravy, Jo Carson, Folklife Play

Karen Laughlin, Professor Directing Dissertation; Stuart Baker, Outside Committee Member; Hunt Hawkins, Committee Member; Linda Saladin-Adams, Committee Member; Jerrilyn McGregory, Committee Member.

Advisors/Committee Members: Karen Laughlin (professor directing dissertation), Stuart Baker (outside committee member), Hunt Hawkins (committee member), Linda Saladin-Adams (committee member), Jerrilyn McGregory (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: English literature

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jones, D. C. (2006). Jo Carson's Contribution to the Swamp Gravy Recipe. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida State University. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-3436 ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jones, Debra Calhoun. “Jo Carson's Contribution to the Swamp Gravy Recipe.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida State University. Accessed November 17, 2019. http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-3436 ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jones, Debra Calhoun. “Jo Carson's Contribution to the Swamp Gravy Recipe.” 2006. Web. 17 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Jones DC. Jo Carson's Contribution to the Swamp Gravy Recipe. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida State University; 2006. [cited 2019 Nov 17]. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-3436 ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Jones DC. Jo Carson's Contribution to the Swamp Gravy Recipe. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida State University; 2006. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-3436 ;

.