Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Florida State University" +contributor:("John P. Lunstrum"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Florida State University

1. Rambosk, Peggy. Florida Pre-Service Teachers' and Their Attitudes Towards the Use of Controversial Issues.

Degree: PhD, Teacher Education, 2011, Florida State University

The purpose of this attitudinal study is to investigate the role that social studies methods courses in Florida play in examining controversial issues with their pre-service teachers'. Five research questions established the parameters for the investigation of pre-service teachers' attitudes toward the use of controversial issues through the utilization of a survey instrument, the Florida Pre-Service Teachers' Controversial Issues Questionnaire (FPTCIQ). The FPTCIQ was mailed to 435 pre-service teachers enrolled in social studies methods courses at the Florida State University, the University of North Florida, and the University of South Florida. Of the 435 pre-service teachers' in social studies methods courses, 203 respondents returned the FPTCIQ with a 47% response rate. The FPTCIQ is comprised of questions that asked respondents to rank the controversiality of thirty issues. The FPTCIQ also measured pre-service teachers' awareness of issues taught in their social studies methods courses, pre-service teachers' willingness to discuss issues in their future classrooms, pre-service teachers' reasons for not discussing issues, and pre-service teachers' belief in traditional socio-political values. Pre-Service teachers' were asked questions about how much time they spent examining controversial issues in their social studies methods course, and should pre-service teachers' participate in the discussion of controversial issues in these courses. Demographic characteristics of respondents' included gender, religious affiliation, ethnicity, and region/locale of the university attending were also recorded. Respondents rank gay/lesbian rights as the most controversial issue. In addition, pre-service teachers' were less willing to teach about creationism than other issues and listed external pressures as the primary reason. Only 32% of the respondents discussed controversial issues in their social studies methods course. After the findings were statistically analyzed and cross-sectioned with the research questions, the demographic characteristics comprising all participants in this study was correlated and analyzed.

A Dissertation Submitted to the the School of Teacher Education in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophyin Partial Fulfillment of the Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2011.

Spring Semester, 2011.

January 31, 2011.

Social Studies Methods Classes, Controversial Issues, Florida Preservice Teachers

John P. Lunstrum, Professor Directing Dissertation; Edward Wynot, Committee Member; Helge Swanson, Committee Member.

Advisors/Committee Members: John P. Lunstrum (professor directing dissertation), Edward Wynot (committee member), Helge Swanson (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Teachers; Training of

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rambosk, P. (2011). Florida Pre-Service Teachers' and Their Attitudes Towards the Use of Controversial Issues. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida State University. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-2134 ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rambosk, Peggy. “Florida Pre-Service Teachers' and Their Attitudes Towards the Use of Controversial Issues.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida State University. Accessed July 21, 2019. http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-2134 ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rambosk, Peggy. “Florida Pre-Service Teachers' and Their Attitudes Towards the Use of Controversial Issues.” 2011. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Rambosk P. Florida Pre-Service Teachers' and Their Attitudes Towards the Use of Controversial Issues. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida State University; 2011. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-2134 ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Rambosk P. Florida Pre-Service Teachers' and Their Attitudes Towards the Use of Controversial Issues. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida State University; 2011. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-2134 ;


Florida State University

2. Jeremiah, Koketso. Junior Secondary School Students' Recognition of Kagisano/Social Harmony, the National Philosophy of Botswana.

Degree: PhD, Middle and Secondary Education, 2005, Florida State University

Kagisano or Social Harmony is a very important national philosophy for Botswana, mainly because the society of Botswana is characterized by ethnic diversity. Kagisano is viewed as essential for maintaining stability in such an ethnically diverse society. The junior secondary school social studies curriculum marginally covers this philosophy. The purpose of this study was to investigate junior secondary school students' abilities to recognize Kagisano or Social Harmony. A total of 893 students from four government junior secondary schools in Gaborone, the capital city of Botswana, were sampled for the study. The break down of the sample was: 291 Form 1(Year 1) students, 289 Form 2 (Year 1) students, and 313 Form 3 (Year 3) students. A questionnaire (the same) was administered to all students in the sample. The research design was therefore, a survey. Responses of students to the questionnaire items were converted into scores. The study found that 84% of Form 3 students (research group) were successful in recognizing Kagisano or Social Harmony. All moderating (intervening) variables (school, ethnic background, age and gender) produced both consistent and inconsistent results. However, consistent results were outweighed by inconsistent results. The variable school produced the most consistent results whereas age group produced the most inconsistent results. Still on age group, age groups 17 and 18 consistently ranked lowest in the age group variable category. Thus, there was a general decline in recognition of Kagisano with increasing age. The variable gender produced results that alternated in patterns (or trends) when frequencies and/or percentages were used alternatively with the use of median scores. ANOVA showed that the moderating (intervening) variable school was statistically significant (F [3, 304] = 10.381, p = .000, p .05), including the results of a Post Hoc Test. Numerically (i.e. by frequency or percentage), the males performed better than the females (89% versus 87.5%) but the females performed better than the males in quality terms as indicated by the median scores 57.5 and 52.5, respectively. ANOVA results showed that the mean scores of the males and females were not statistically significant (F [2, 310] = 2.609, p = .075, p > .05). A Post Hoc Test showed the same results, i.e. no statistical significance for the mean scores of males and females. ANOVA also showed that the mean scores of Form/Year 1, Form/Year 2, and Form/Year 3 students in the sample were statistically significant (F [2, 890)] = 27.612, p = .000, p .05). A Post Hoc Test showed the same results, i.e. no statistical significance for the mean scores of males and females. ANOVA also showed that the mean scores of Form/Year 1, Form/Year 2, and Form/Year 3 students in the sample were statistically significant (F [2, 890)] = 27.612, p = .000, p

A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Middle and Secondary Education in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.

Fall Semester,…

Advisors/Committee Members: John P. Lunstrum (professor directing dissertation), John H. Hansen (outside committee member), Robert Gutierrez (committee member), Laurie E. S. Molina (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Education

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jeremiah, K. (2005). Junior Secondary School Students' Recognition of Kagisano/Social Harmony, the National Philosophy of Botswana. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida State University. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-3524 ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jeremiah, Koketso. “Junior Secondary School Students' Recognition of Kagisano/Social Harmony, the National Philosophy of Botswana.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida State University. Accessed July 21, 2019. http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-3524 ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jeremiah, Koketso. “Junior Secondary School Students' Recognition of Kagisano/Social Harmony, the National Philosophy of Botswana.” 2005. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Jeremiah K. Junior Secondary School Students' Recognition of Kagisano/Social Harmony, the National Philosophy of Botswana. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida State University; 2005. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-3524 ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Jeremiah K. Junior Secondary School Students' Recognition of Kagisano/Social Harmony, the National Philosophy of Botswana. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida State University; 2005. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-3524 ;


Florida State University

3. Aydin, Necati. Gender Wage Differential and the Under-Representation of Women in IT Education Programs & IT Workforce.

Degree: PhD, Middle and Secondary Education, 2003, Florida State University

This study examines the determinants of earnings and gender wage differentials for Florida's IT graduates and IT workers by using the Mincerian regression model and the Blinder-Oaxaca wage decomposition model. Florida Education and Training Placement Information Program (FETPIP) data and Census Microdata (PUMS) are used in both models to shed some light on the increasing under-representation of women in the IT workforce. The study finds that there has been little or no gender wage difference for IT graduates from the Community Colleges (CC) and Post-Secondary Education (PSE) programs, while there has been an increasing gender wage difference for the Public University (SUS) IT graduates since 1993. The gender coefficients from the Mincerian regression models indicate that the rate for the SUS IT graduates increased from its low value of 2% to the high value of 12% in the year 2002. The gender wage differential rates for the SUS IT graduates measured from the Blinder-Oaxaca model are consistent with the Mincerian Regression results. The wage decomposition model reveals that the gender wage differentials for SUS IT graduates increased from 10% in the year 1996, to 18% in the year 2002. The model further indicates that 30% of this wage gap in the year 2002 was due to gender discrimination. The study finds that a proxy experience variable overestimates the impact of experience on earnings for female workers. The study presents a notable difference between the impact of the actual experience variable based on FETPIP data and that of a proxy variable based on the PUMS data.

A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Middle and Secondary Education in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.

Degree Awarded: Fall Semester, 2003.

Date of Defense: November 11, 2003.

IT workers, Gender wage differentials, Discrimination, Earnings, Women

John P. Lunstrum, Professor Co-Directing Dissertation; Victoria M. MacDonald, Professor Co-Directing Dissertation; James H. Cobbe, Outside Committee Member; John H. Hansen, Committee Member; Douglas N. Harris, Committee Member.

Advisors/Committee Members: John P. Lunstrum (professor co-directing dissertation), Victoria M. MacDonald (professor co-directing dissertation), James H. Cobbe (outside committee member), John H. Hansen (committee member), Douglas N. Harris (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Education

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Aydin, N. (2003). Gender Wage Differential and the Under-Representation of Women in IT Education Programs & IT Workforce. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida State University. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-0010 ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Aydin, Necati. “Gender Wage Differential and the Under-Representation of Women in IT Education Programs & IT Workforce.” 2003. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida State University. Accessed July 21, 2019. http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-0010 ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Aydin, Necati. “Gender Wage Differential and the Under-Representation of Women in IT Education Programs & IT Workforce.” 2003. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Aydin N. Gender Wage Differential and the Under-Representation of Women in IT Education Programs & IT Workforce. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida State University; 2003. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-0010 ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Aydin N. Gender Wage Differential and the Under-Representation of Women in IT Education Programs & IT Workforce. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida State University; 2003. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-0010 ;

.